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Pigskin picks

Week 6 winners

 

There were 27 qualified entries for the sixth week of the contest. No contestants picked all 10 games correctly; no one picked nine games correctly; 13 picked eight games correctly; and 14 picked seven games correctly.

Forty-nine contestants did not pick at least seven games correctly in order to qualify for the
drawing.

Week 6 winners of the Pigskin Picks T-shirt are Mike Enright, of Grovetown, Sherwood Vaughn, of Martinez, and Trudie Dorsey, of Grovetown.

Winners should call the News-Times office at (706) 868-1222 in order to pick up their prizes.

 

Week 6 qualifiers:

Mike Enright, Sherwood Vaughn, Trudie Dorsey, Frances M. Bagley, Mark Jones, Jaxson Curd, Corky Holloway, Waunice Aldridge, Don Randolph, Nancy Edenfield, Lenton Griffin, Terry Meeks, Nancy Libengood, Ed Manders, Tripp Maxwell, Barry Sumner, Susan Sumner, Debbie Holloway, Bill Jones, Jim Park, Dolores Randolph, Mike Edenfield, Kathy
Enright, Byron Ray Wren, Donald Long, David Whitfield and Joey Hall.

Categories: Local

Pigskin picks

Week 6 winners

 

There were 27 qualified entries for the sixth week of the contest. No contestants picked all 10 games correctly; no one picked nine games correctly; 13 picked eight games correctly; and 14 picked seven games correctly.

Forty-nine contestants did not pick at least seven games correctly in order to qualify for the
drawing.

Week 6 winners of the Pigskin Picks T-shirt are Mike Enright, of Grovetown, Sherwood Vaughn, of Martinez, and Trudie Dorsey, of Grovetown.

Winners should call the News-Times office at (706) 868-1222 in order to pick up their prizes.

 

Week 6 qualifiers:

Mike Enright, Sherwood Vaughn, Trudie Dorsey, Frances M. Bagley, Mark Jones, Jaxson Curd, Corky Holloway, Waunice Aldridge, Don Randolph, Nancy Edenfield, Lenton Griffin, Terry Meeks, Nancy Libengood, Ed Manders, Tripp Maxwell, Barry Sumner, Susan Sumner, Debbie Holloway, Bill Jones, Jim Park, Dolores Randolph, Mike Edenfield, Kathy
Enright, Byron Ray Wren, Donald Long, David Whitfield and Joey Hall.

Categories: Local

Superintendent's election will bring a new face

ATLANTA — No matter who wins, there will be a new state superintendent of schools after the fall election, and voters are still getting to know the two hopefuls.

Republican Richard Woods has spent his career in the Irwin County school system with its three schools and 1,800 students in Ocilla. He’s a career educator who’s owned a small business and once worked as a company purchasing agent.

Democrat Valarie Wilson has worked in government and nonprofits and was elected to the Decatur City School Board, serving a term as its chairwoman and overseeing eight schools and 3,500 students. She also completed a tour as head of the association of the state’s school-board members, but she has never worked in a classroom.

Their careers and political parties aren’t all that is different between them. They also view aspects of public education differently.

The clearest distinction is on the Common Core multi-state education standards that she favors Georgia using and he opposes. She argues it will help students reach achievement levels found in other states while he says it watered down Georgia’s previous requirements and muddled curriculum.

“We’re asking our schools, our students, to be accountable to something we really don’t have a handle on,” he said, stressing that the standards should be written by Georgians.

Wilson emphasizes her intention of spending her term lobbying for greater spending on public schools.

“We have got to make public education a priority and provide the resources for it,” she often says.

Woods counters that the current level of spending can be made more effective with a comprehensive audit and improved purchasing procedures.

“From an operational standpoint, make sure we’re moving money into the area that we need to look at,” he said. “To just keep saying, ‘We need more money, more money, more money,’ is not the answer, and I think it’s even more critical to make sure it’s going to places that will benefit education across the board.”

And she tells teacher groups she intends to represent them.

“We have some of the best educators in this country,” she said in a recent forum. “I want to continue to be your advocate to ensure your voice is heard.”

Categories: Local

Superintendent's election will bring a new face

ATLANTA — No matter who wins, there will be a new state superintendent of schools after the fall election, and voters are still getting to know the two hopefuls.

Republican Richard Woods has spent his career in the Irwin County school system with its three schools and 1,800 students in Ocilla. He’s a career educator who’s owned a small business and once worked as a company purchasing agent.

Democrat Valarie Wilson has worked in government and nonprofits and was elected to the Decatur City School Board, serving a term as its chairwoman and overseeing eight schools and 3,500 students. She also completed a tour as head of the association of the state’s school-board members, but she has never worked in a classroom.

Their careers and political parties aren’t all that is different between them. They also view aspects of public education differently.

The clearest distinction is on the Common Core multi-state education standards that she favors Georgia using and he opposes. She argues it will help students reach achievement levels found in other states while he says it watered down Georgia’s previous requirements and muddled curriculum.

“We’re asking our schools, our students, to be accountable to something we really don’t have a handle on,” he said, stressing that the standards should be written by Georgians.

Wilson emphasizes her intention of spending her term lobbying for greater spending on public schools.

“We have got to make public education a priority and provide the resources for it,” she often says.

Woods counters that the current level of spending can be made more effective with a comprehensive audit and improved purchasing procedures.

“From an operational standpoint, make sure we’re moving money into the area that we need to look at,” he said. “To just keep saying, ‘We need more money, more money, more money,’ is not the answer, and I think it’s even more critical to make sure it’s going to places that will benefit education across the board.”

And she tells teacher groups she intends to represent them.

“We have some of the best educators in this country,” she said in a recent forum. “I want to continue to be your advocate to ensure your voice is heard.”

Categories: Local

Unemployment rate, unions, min. wage all figure in race for labor commissioner

By Walter C. Jones

ATLANTA — With the highest unemployment rate in the country to defend, Republican Mark Butler could be very vulnerable as he seeks a second term as labor commissioner on this fall’s ballot.

Democratic challenger Robbin Shipp is trying to exploit that, and she’s also pledging to boost the minimum wage and strengthen labor unions.

Butler isn’t the least defensive about his record. While the unemployment rate might be high, the state is the sixth-fastest at creating jobs. That’s attracting people looking for work and keeping the jobless rate high, he says.

“You can’t just look at one factor and say, ‘Oh gosh, everything is going down,’” he said.

Butler argues he deserves re-election because his programs are working. First-time claims for unemployment benefits are declining, and his Jobs for Georgia Graduates that involves working with high schoolers at risk of dropping out has a 95-percent graduation rate, he said.

At the same time, the department has 31 percent fewer employees, has paid off the federal loan that was needed to bail out the unemployment insurance trust fund, and the fund now has a $500 million balance.

Raising the state’s minimum wage from $5.15 per hour to above the federal minimum of $7.25 and up to as much as $15 is the centerpiece of Shipp’s economic-development platform.

She said putting more money into consumers’ hands would also benefit the businesses they patronize.

“It’s a fundamental principle of economics that the more money individuals – particularly in the middle class – have in their pockets, the more they then go out and spend. It is that spending which creates jobs,” she told the audience at a candidates forum organized by the League of Women Voters.

Butler disagrees, warning that a higher bottom wage will discourage employers and not ultimately help entry-level workers once the triggered inflation takes hold.

“The best way to improve someone’s wages – and we do it now at the Labor Department – is to guide them to additional training,” he said.

Shipp said she would use the post as commissioner to lobby for the wage hike as well as for union-friendly laws.

“When you have unions, you have higher wages,” Shipp said.

Butler said her position would discourage overseas companies from bringing jobs to the state.

“If you want to kill some foreign investment, kill right to work,” he said.

Georgia is considered a “right to work” state because the law here prohibits union membership as a condition of employment. Butler said states that have had such union-shop laws requiring membership are now repealing them in an effort to halt the exodus of employers heading for places such as Georgia.

Categories: Local

Unemployment rate, unions, min. wage all figure in race for labor commissioner

By Walter C. Jones

ATLANTA — With the highest unemployment rate in the country to defend, Republican Mark Butler could be very vulnerable as he seeks a second term as labor commissioner on this fall’s ballot.

Democratic challenger Robbin Shipp is trying to exploit that, and she’s also pledging to boost the minimum wage and strengthen labor unions.

Butler isn’t the least defensive about his record. While the unemployment rate might be high, the state is the sixth-fastest at creating jobs. That’s attracting people looking for work and keeping the jobless rate high, he says.

“You can’t just look at one factor and say, ‘Oh gosh, everything is going down,’” he said.

Butler argues he deserves re-election because his programs are working. First-time claims for unemployment benefits are declining, and his Jobs for Georgia Graduates that involves working with high schoolers at risk of dropping out has a 95-percent graduation rate, he said.

At the same time, the department has 31 percent fewer employees, has paid off the federal loan that was needed to bail out the unemployment insurance trust fund, and the fund now has a $500 million balance.

Raising the state’s minimum wage from $5.15 per hour to above the federal minimum of $7.25 and up to as much as $15 is the centerpiece of Shipp’s economic-development platform.

She said putting more money into consumers’ hands would also benefit the businesses they patronize.

“It’s a fundamental principle of economics that the more money individuals – particularly in the middle class – have in their pockets, the more they then go out and spend. It is that spending which creates jobs,” she told the audience at a candidates forum organized by the League of Women Voters.

Butler disagrees, warning that a higher bottom wage will discourage employers and not ultimately help entry-level workers once the triggered inflation takes hold.

“The best way to improve someone’s wages – and we do it now at the Labor Department – is to guide them to additional training,” he said.

Shipp said she would use the post as commissioner to lobby for the wage hike as well as for union-friendly laws.

“When you have unions, you have higher wages,” Shipp said.

Butler said her position would discourage overseas companies from bringing jobs to the state.

“If you want to kill some foreign investment, kill right to work,” he said.

Georgia is considered a “right to work” state because the law here prohibits union membership as a condition of employment. Butler said states that have had such union-shop laws requiring membership are now repealing them in an effort to halt the exodus of employers heading for places such as Georgia.

Categories: Local

Pet Adoptions

Categories: Local

Current Events

UPCOMING

Grant program

Grant Program to enhance tourism in Columbia County; available to qualifying agencies to promote activities, attractions and special events; overseen by Columbia County Convention and Visitors Bureau; to apply, contact Shelly Blackburn for application or information; (706) 447-7677,
sblackburn@choosecolumbiacounty.com

Grants available

Columbia County Forward Foundation accepting applications for five $1,000 grants to be awarded to organizations to promote philanthropy in Columbia County; compete application at ccforwardfoundation.org and provide a 300-500 word proposal; application deadline 5 p.m. Friday, Oct. 31; information: Jessica Perry, info@ccforwardfoundation.com

Museum

Grovetown Museum, 106 E. Robinson Ave.; open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Fridays, 1-4 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays; children must be accompanied by adult; donations accepted; (706) 863-1867

Pageant

Columbia County Forestry and Pine Seedling Scholarship Pageant – Promoting and Protecting the Forestry Industry; March 7; queens will serve as hosts at the Miss Georgia Forestry Pageant in Tifton, Ga.; winner and three runner-ups in each age group – Baby Miss birth to 23 months, Teeny Miss 2-3 years, Tiny Miss 4-6 years, Little Miss 7-9 years, Junior Miss 10-12 years, Teen Miss 13-16 years, Miss 17-24 years; $85 for Baby Miss through Teen Miss, $100 for Miss entries; optional categories of Prettiest Dress, Prettiest Smile, Photogenic, Prettiest Face, Best Personality and Photogenic $15 each; (706) 664-5010, columbiacounty
forestry@gmail.com

Harlem council

Forming a nonprofit organization whose purpose is to offer Harlem a quality experience with performing arts, visual arts and history; Janet Luckey-Short Luckey–janet@yahoo.com, Ann Blalock blalock@hotmail.com Legal/financial

Legal and Financial Planning – Alzheimer’s Disease 6-8 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 8, Alzheimer’s Association, 106 SRP Drive Suite A, Evans; attorney Patrick Smith, speaker; free; reservations required by noon Oct. 7 by phone or e-mail; (800) 272-3900, bwilliams@alz.org,
alz.org

Seminar

Organizing From Within, 5 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 9, MindBody Stress Reduction Programs, 4210 Columbia Road, Martinez; professional organizer Marin Rose leads seminar; free, reservations required; (202) 423-3581, info@libraorganizing.com, libraorganizing.com

Archaeology

Augusta Archaeological Society meeting Thursday, Oct. 9, Big Daddy’s Bar and Grill, 4045 Jimmie Dyess Parkway; dinner on own 6:30 p.m., program 8 p.m.; Dr. Albert C. Goodyear, presenting The Allendale-Brier Creek Clovis Complex in the Central Savannah River Valley; (706) 829-1615

Tee Off

9 a.m. Friday, Oct. 10, Jones Creek Golf Club, 777 Jones Creek Drive; benefits breast cancer research

Roller derby

Soul City Sirens vs. Molly Rodger Rollergirls Roller Derby 6 p.m. Friday, Oct. 10, Columbia County Exhibition Center, 212 Partnership Drive, Grovetown; doors open 5:30 p.m.; $12 advance, $15 at door, ages 12 and younger free

Celebrate

Break the Chains that Bind You 6:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 10, Grace Baptist Church, 4945 Hardy McManus Road, Evans; food and fellowship followed by praise and worship and small groups

Hospitality

Columbia County Convention and Visitors Bureau meeting 9 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 14, Snelling Center, 3165 Washington Road; inviting front desk clerks, waiters and housekeeping crews for presentation by hospitality professional Nancy Browning; reservations required by Friday, Oct. 10; (706) 447-7677, sblackburn@choosecolumbiacounty.com

Fundraiser

Greater Augusta Partnership for Literacy fundraiser 8-10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 11, Fatz Cafe, 464 N. Belair Road, Evans; three pancakes, sausage links, fruit cup and a drink; $8, ages 5 and younger eat free with purchase of adult ticket; augustaliteracy.org

Shredding event

Free community paper-shredding 8-11 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 11, parking lot of The Cleveland Group, 3740 Executive Center Drive, Martinez; open to households and small businesses; shredded materials recycled; free coffee and pastries; held by Professional Organizers of Augusta

Birding

Augusta-Aiken Audubon field trip 9 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 11, Aiken State Park, 1145 State Park Road, Windsor; looking for fall migrant birds and late butterflies and dragonflies; bring lunch; Anne Waters and Lois Stacey lead; $2 park fee; augustaaikenaudubon.org

Tax-Aide

AARP Foundation Tax-Aide needs volunteers to prepare returns, greet users and ensure things run smoothly at locations throughout Georgia and nationwide; sign up to train for the 2015 tax season at aarp.org/taxvolunteer

Fair pageant

2014 Miss Columbia County Fair Scholarship Pageant 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 25, Greenbrier High School, 5114 Riverwood Parkway, Evans; for women ages 17-23 who are residents of or attend school in the Central Savannah River Area; entry deadline Monday, Oct. 20; applications online at columbiacountyfair.net or call Pat Becton at (706) 863-7645

Categories: Local

Current Events

UPCOMING

Grant program

Grant Program to enhance tourism in Columbia County; available to qualifying agencies to promote activities, attractions and special events; overseen by Columbia County Convention and Visitors Bureau; to apply, contact Shelly Blackburn for application or information; (706) 447-7677,
sblackburn@choosecolumbiacounty.com

Grants available

Columbia County Forward Foundation accepting applications for five $1,000 grants to be awarded to organizations to promote philanthropy in Columbia County; compete application at ccforwardfoundation.org and provide a 300-500 word proposal; application deadline 5 p.m. Friday, Oct. 31; information: Jessica Perry, info@ccforwardfoundation.com

Museum

Grovetown Museum, 106 E. Robinson Ave.; open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Fridays, 1-4 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays; children must be accompanied by adult; donations accepted; (706) 863-1867

Pageant

Columbia County Forestry and Pine Seedling Scholarship Pageant – Promoting and Protecting the Forestry Industry; March 7; queens will serve as hosts at the Miss Georgia Forestry Pageant in Tifton, Ga.; winner and three runner-ups in each age group – Baby Miss birth to 23 months, Teeny Miss 2-3 years, Tiny Miss 4-6 years, Little Miss 7-9 years, Junior Miss 10-12 years, Teen Miss 13-16 years, Miss 17-24 years; $85 for Baby Miss through Teen Miss, $100 for Miss entries; optional categories of Prettiest Dress, Prettiest Smile, Photogenic, Prettiest Face, Best Personality and Photogenic $15 each; (706) 664-5010, columbiacounty
forestry@gmail.com

Harlem council

Forming a nonprofit organization whose purpose is to offer Harlem a quality experience with performing arts, visual arts and history; Janet Luckey-Short Luckey–janet@yahoo.com, Ann Blalock blalock@hotmail.com Legal/financial

Legal and Financial Planning – Alzheimer’s Disease 6-8 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 8, Alzheimer’s Association, 106 SRP Drive Suite A, Evans; attorney Patrick Smith, speaker; free; reservations required by noon Oct. 7 by phone or e-mail; (800) 272-3900, bwilliams@alz.org,
alz.org

Seminar

Organizing From Within, 5 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 9, MindBody Stress Reduction Programs, 4210 Columbia Road, Martinez; professional organizer Marin Rose leads seminar; free, reservations required; (202) 423-3581, info@libraorganizing.com, libraorganizing.com

Archaeology

Augusta Archaeological Society meeting Thursday, Oct. 9, Big Daddy’s Bar and Grill, 4045 Jimmie Dyess Parkway; dinner on own 6:30 p.m., program 8 p.m.; Dr. Albert C. Goodyear, presenting The Allendale-Brier Creek Clovis Complex in the Central Savannah River Valley; (706) 829-1615

Tee Off

9 a.m. Friday, Oct. 10, Jones Creek Golf Club, 777 Jones Creek Drive; benefits breast cancer research

Roller derby

Soul City Sirens vs. Molly Rodger Rollergirls Roller Derby 6 p.m. Friday, Oct. 10, Columbia County Exhibition Center, 212 Partnership Drive, Grovetown; doors open 5:30 p.m.; $12 advance, $15 at door, ages 12 and younger free

Celebrate

Break the Chains that Bind You 6:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 10, Grace Baptist Church, 4945 Hardy McManus Road, Evans; food and fellowship followed by praise and worship and small groups

Hospitality

Columbia County Convention and Visitors Bureau meeting 9 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 14, Snelling Center, 3165 Washington Road; inviting front desk clerks, waiters and housekeeping crews for presentation by hospitality professional Nancy Browning; reservations required by Friday, Oct. 10; (706) 447-7677, sblackburn@choosecolumbiacounty.com

Fundraiser

Greater Augusta Partnership for Literacy fundraiser 8-10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 11, Fatz Cafe, 464 N. Belair Road, Evans; three pancakes, sausage links, fruit cup and a drink; $8, ages 5 and younger eat free with purchase of adult ticket; augustaliteracy.org

Shredding event

Free community paper-shredding 8-11 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 11, parking lot of The Cleveland Group, 3740 Executive Center Drive, Martinez; open to households and small businesses; shredded materials recycled; free coffee and pastries; held by Professional Organizers of Augusta

Birding

Augusta-Aiken Audubon field trip 9 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 11, Aiken State Park, 1145 State Park Road, Windsor; looking for fall migrant birds and late butterflies and dragonflies; bring lunch; Anne Waters and Lois Stacey lead; $2 park fee; augustaaikenaudubon.org

Tax-Aide

AARP Foundation Tax-Aide needs volunteers to prepare returns, greet users and ensure things run smoothly at locations throughout Georgia and nationwide; sign up to train for the 2015 tax season at aarp.org/taxvolunteer

Fair pageant

2014 Miss Columbia County Fair Scholarship Pageant 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 25, Greenbrier High School, 5114 Riverwood Parkway, Evans; for women ages 17-23 who are residents of or attend school in the Central Savannah River Area; entry deadline Monday, Oct. 20; applications online at columbiacountyfair.net or call Pat Becton at (706) 863-7645

Categories: Local

Police Blotter

The following accounts were taken from Columbia County Sheriff’s Office incident reports:

Man takes bath in splash pad

A woman called deputies to the Columbia County amphitheater Friday morning after seeing a man bathing in the children’s splash pad.

The woman said she was jogging around the pond behind the Columbia County Government Complex on Ronald Reagan Drive in Evans just before 9 a.m., when she saw a man bathing in the splash pad at the playground behind the Columbia County Library. She said he was wearing shorts, but looked suspicious and inappropriate for the location.

A deputy found the man sitting on a bench near the pond. He told the deputy he was homeless and slept near a bush in the park the previous night. When asked what he was doing in the fountain, the man said he was washing off the dirt from sleeping on the ground.

The man said he’d purchased a bus ticket and planned to leave town over the weekend.

 

Motorist drives off with nozzle

The owner of a Grove-town convenience store said a motorist drove away from a gas pump Friday morning with the gas hose and nozzle still attached to his vehicle.

The owner of Lewiston Express on Lewiston Road told deputies that at about 9:15 a.m., a woman came into the store and said a small white truck drove away with the gas pump nozzle still attached. She said she yelled at the driver to stop and told him of the situation. He yelled, “I know,” and drove away.

A witness who was also in the parking lot at the time heard the woman yell and the truck driver stop and look out of his window. She also heard the man’s response.

The owner said it didn’t appear the man initially knew the nozzle was still in the opening of his gas tank when he tried to leave.

 

Man shoots own hand

A man called authorities Friday afternoon after he said he accidentally shot himself.

The man said he was visiting his grandmother near Grovetown just before 2 p.m. It was raining, so he ran to his vehicle. His pistol fell out of his back pocket and into a mud puddle. He quickly picked up the gun and got into his vehicle.

The man said he released the magazine to clean the pistol off. He said he went to lock the slide back and forgot a round was in the chamber. The firearm went off into the man’s right palm.

He called 911 and was taken to an area hospital for treatment.

Caller asks for personal info

A Martinez man said Friday that someone claiming to be a computer technician tried and failed to get his personal information.

The caller ID showed the call came from a strange number – 2-389-9306.

 

Deputy’s home hit by burglars

The wife of a Richmond County sheriff’s deputy called Columbia County authorities late Thursday after discovering someone burglarized their home.

The 23-year-old woman said she remembered closing and locking the door to the house under the carport when she left at about 6 p.m. When she returned at about 9:30 p.m., the woman found the door cracked open.

She waited for her husband, a deputy in Richmond County, to come home and clear the house before she went inside.

The woman said nothing appeared to be missing and the only thing out of place was a pair of scissors left on the kitchen counter.

Categories: Local

Police Blotter

The following accounts were taken from Columbia County Sheriff’s Office incident reports:

Man takes bath in splash pad

A woman called deputies to the Columbia County amphitheater Friday morning after seeing a man bathing in the children’s splash pad.

The woman said she was jogging around the pond behind the Columbia County Government Complex on Ronald Reagan Drive in Evans just before 9 a.m., when she saw a man bathing in the splash pad at the playground behind the Columbia County Library. She said he was wearing shorts, but looked suspicious and inappropriate for the location.

A deputy found the man sitting on a bench near the pond. He told the deputy he was homeless and slept near a bush in the park the previous night. When asked what he was doing in the fountain, the man said he was washing off the dirt from sleeping on the ground.

The man said he’d purchased a bus ticket and planned to leave town over the weekend.

 

Motorist drives off with nozzle

The owner of a Grove-town convenience store said a motorist drove away from a gas pump Friday morning with the gas hose and nozzle still attached to his vehicle.

The owner of Lewiston Express on Lewiston Road told deputies that at about 9:15 a.m., a woman came into the store and said a small white truck drove away with the gas pump nozzle still attached. She said she yelled at the driver to stop and told him of the situation. He yelled, “I know,” and drove away.

A witness who was also in the parking lot at the time heard the woman yell and the truck driver stop and look out of his window. She also heard the man’s response.

The owner said it didn’t appear the man initially knew the nozzle was still in the opening of his gas tank when he tried to leave.

 

Man shoots own hand

A man called authorities Friday afternoon after he said he accidentally shot himself.

The man said he was visiting his grandmother near Grovetown just before 2 p.m. It was raining, so he ran to his vehicle. His pistol fell out of his back pocket and into a mud puddle. He quickly picked up the gun and got into his vehicle.

The man said he released the magazine to clean the pistol off. He said he went to lock the slide back and forgot a round was in the chamber. The firearm went off into the man’s right palm.

He called 911 and was taken to an area hospital for treatment.

Caller asks for personal info

A Martinez man said Friday that someone claiming to be a computer technician tried and failed to get his personal information.

The caller ID showed the call came from a strange number – 2-389-9306.

 

Deputy’s home hit by burglars

The wife of a Richmond County sheriff’s deputy called Columbia County authorities late Thursday after discovering someone burglarized their home.

The 23-year-old woman said she remembered closing and locking the door to the house under the carport when she left at about 6 p.m. When she returned at about 9:30 p.m., the woman found the door cracked open.

She waited for her husband, a deputy in Richmond County, to come home and clear the house before she went inside.

The woman said nothing appeared to be missing and the only thing out of place was a pair of scissors left on the kitchen counter.

Categories: Local

Marching bands work hard on and off the field to raise funds

As the Grovetown Band of Warriors gear up for their annual marching-band competition, all the other high school marching bands are working hard to raise funds as well.

In the school’s sixth year, band members continue to find creative ways to raise money to purchase their first new uniforms.

“We are committed to buying them with money that we have before we buy them,” Grovetown High School Band Director Brian Toney said. “We want to be fiscally responsible. We’re not going to go into debt to get these uniforms.”

The competition, which began in 2010, is the band’s largest fundraiser.

Toney said eight bands will perform beginning at about 1 p.m. Saturday at the school stadium on William Few Parkway. Tickets cost $5 for an entire day of marching band performances.

The participating bands are all more than 100 members and include Grovetown performing an exhibition, as well as Lakeside, Greenbrier, North Augusta high schools and others from the Savannah and Atlanta areas. The competition also includes concessions and drawings.

“It’s going to be a great show, a very high-quality show,” Toney said.

Toney said the students mainly run the event to help raise the $63,000 to $90,000 needed to purchase new uniforms.

“It does really well for us,” Toney said. “I really like the aspect of them being involved in running something. Our kids take ownership of this.”

The band members also will be selling poinsettias for the holiday season. Red, white and marble plants will be selling for $18 beginning in mid-October and will arrive in early December.To order, e-mail GTHSbandboosters@gmail.com.

A popular marching-band fundraiser is the sale of fruit. “It’s easy to sell because people like it,” Evans High School Band Director Reid Hall said. She said former director Richard Brasco brought the fruit sale to the school in the early 1980s.

Because so many bands sell fruit, it’s not as lucrative for the band as it used to be. While the school system provides a budget for what the band program needs, the fundraisers help provide the extras for the program and to help students afford to go on trips. The band will be traveling to Disney World in Orlando, Fla., in the spring.

The Evans band members are trying something new, selling pink plumes for the band members hats to be worn at football games in October. They are requesting $20 for a plume in memory or in honor of someone. The names will be read at halftime during games all month. Half of the cost goes to the students and the other half will be made as a donation to the American Cancer Society.

“I’m really excited about this,” Hall said. “We’re always doing so much fundraising to support our own program, it’s nice to be able to do something for another cause too.”

Lakeside High School Band Director Jim Tau said his students are selling fruit as well. The sale is almost a tradition by now, he said.

“We go somewhere every spring,” Tau said. “Our goal is to sell 2,000 boxes, a semi truck full.”

The band will be headed to Washington, D.C., and Williamsburg, Va., in the spring.

Harlem High band students are selling fruit to help prepare to purchase new uniforms because of normal wear and tear.

Greenbrier High band members are selling fruit as well. They are also selling raffle tickets to win a $1,000 prize.

Proceeds from those sales go toward the general running of the band as well as more uniforms that will need to be replaced within the next three years, according to band Director Michael Katterjohn.

Categories: Local

Marching bands work hard on and off the field to raise funds

As the Grovetown Band of Warriors gear up for their annual marching-band competition, all the other high school marching bands are working hard to raise funds as well.

In the school’s sixth year, band members continue to find creative ways to raise money to purchase their first new uniforms.

“We are committed to buying them with money that we have before we buy them,” Grovetown High School Band Director Brian Toney said. “We want to be fiscally responsible. We’re not going to go into debt to get these uniforms.”

The competition, which began in 2010, is the band’s largest fundraiser.

Toney said eight bands will perform beginning at about 1 p.m. Saturday at the school stadium on William Few Parkway. Tickets cost $5 for an entire day of marching band performances.

The participating bands are all more than 100 members and include Grovetown performing an exhibition, as well as Lakeside, Greenbrier, North Augusta high schools and others from the Savannah and Atlanta areas. The competition also includes concessions and drawings.

“It’s going to be a great show, a very high-quality show,” Toney said.

Toney said the students mainly run the event to help raise the $63,000 to $90,000 needed to purchase new uniforms.

“It does really well for us,” Toney said. “I really like the aspect of them being involved in running something. Our kids take ownership of this.”

The band members also will be selling poinsettias for the holiday season. Red, white and marble plants will be selling for $18 beginning in mid-October and will arrive in early December.To order, e-mail GTHSbandboosters@gmail.com.

A popular marching-band fundraiser is the sale of fruit. “It’s easy to sell because people like it,” Evans High School Band Director Reid Hall said. She said former director Richard Brasco brought the fruit sale to the school in the early 1980s.

Because so many bands sell fruit, it’s not as lucrative for the band as it used to be. While the school system provides a budget for what the band program needs, the fundraisers help provide the extras for the program and to help students afford to go on trips. The band will be traveling to Disney World in Orlando, Fla., in the spring.

The Evans band members are trying something new, selling pink plumes for the band members hats to be worn at football games in October. They are requesting $20 for a plume in memory or in honor of someone. The names will be read at halftime during games all month. Half of the cost goes to the students and the other half will be made as a donation to the American Cancer Society.

“I’m really excited about this,” Hall said. “We’re always doing so much fundraising to support our own program, it’s nice to be able to do something for another cause too.”

Lakeside High School Band Director Jim Tau said his students are selling fruit as well. The sale is almost a tradition by now, he said.

“We go somewhere every spring,” Tau said. “Our goal is to sell 2,000 boxes, a semi truck full.”

The band will be headed to Washington, D.C., and Williamsburg, Va., in the spring.

Harlem High band students are selling fruit to help prepare to purchase new uniforms because of normal wear and tear.

Greenbrier High band members are selling fruit as well. They are also selling raffle tickets to win a $1,000 prize.

Proceeds from those sales go toward the general running of the band as well as more uniforms that will need to be replaced within the next three years, according to band Director Michael Katterjohn.

Categories: Local

Mega Millions - 10/07/2014

Georgia Lottery - Wed, 10/8/2014 12:00 AM
16-29-46-48-55 Mega Ball: 02 Megaplier: 3X Estimated Jackpot: $150 Million
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Fantasy 5 - 10/07/2014

Georgia Lottery - Wed, 10/8/2014 12:00 AM
02-09-11-15-33 Estimated Jackpot: $337,000
Categories: Local

Dunhill resurrection leaves Oliver Wilson overwhelmed

ScottMichaux.com - Tue, 10/7/2014 6:50 PM
By Scott Michaux

It’s been a couple of days since Oliver Wilson broke into tears on the most storied 18th hole in golf, but the texts, emails and social media well wishes keep pouring in at a rate the Augusta State graduate can’t possibly keep up with.

 

“It’s been mad,” said Wilson of his career resurrecting victory over Rory McIlroy and two other fellow Brits in the Dunhill Links at St. Andrews. “Literally since about 4 o’clock (Monday) morning I’ve been on my phone just trying to respond to all the messages I had. I can’t possibly respond to them all. In fact, Twitter won’t allow me. I can’t go back more than six hours because I have that many messages. It’s just been incredible. It’s really overwhelming.”

 

The outpouring of congratulatory wishes for Wilson speaks to two things. The first is his likeable nature and the level of respect the 34-year-old Englishman has fostered in 11 years since turning professional.

 

The second regards the depths his game had fallen to before Sunday’s revival.

 

“The last two years have been pretty rough and I think a lot of people understand that and I’ve managed to turn it around from pretty much as low as it can go as a professional to pretty much a high point right now,” he said. “I think people can appreciate that and see what I’ve gone through and why I’ve been so emotional.”

 

A Ryder Cup qualifier for Europe in 2008 with a European Tour record nine runner-up finishes without a victory between 2004-09, Wilson lost his card in 2011 and subsequently lost his confidence – especially with his driver. His 2013 season on the Challenge Tour – Europe’s equivalent of the Web.com Tour – was rock bottom when he struggled to break 80 in missing nine consecutive cuts to begin the year.

 

His world ranking plummeted from a high of 35th after his runner-up in the 2009 Dunhill Links to 792nd before last week.

 

“Last year was massively low,” Wilson said of a season that started with a 76.6 scoring average through June. “I was very worried. I tried not to show that to anyone. ... Everybody had sort of written me off and I just almost trying to prove to them that I’m all right. It’s just bad golf. I’m healthy and everything’s good.”

 

His optimistic front included conversations with his wife, Lauren Smith Wilson, who also played golf for Augusta State.

 

“Even this summer I kept telling Lauren I’m doing better and playing better, and it’s not far away,” Wilson said. “I’ve been saying the same thing to everyone for a year and a half, two years. You keep saying it and not backing it up you kind of start to question it yourself. That’s kind of what I’ve done. I’ve thought about doing other things and if I wanted to but deep down I believed in myself and felt like I was capable of doing what I did. But you never really know.”

 

The first turning point for Wilson came in the last month of 2013 when he made seven of his last eight cuts including a Challenge Tour runner-up in Northern Ireland and tie for fifth in Kazakhstan.

 

Then after another rough summer this season, he shot 63 in the second round of his last start in the Kazakhstan Open. Despite a pair of 76s on the weekend and finishing 47th, he brought some confidence with him to the Dunhill Links.

 

“I played one really good round in Kazakhstan and gave me the confidence to know I can still shoot low,” he said. “I know what to do and everything sort of flooded back that day.”

 

Wilson opened the week with a course-record tying 64 at Carnoustie. But unlike the previous year when he faded to 59th after another opening 64, he stayed hot all week and took a three-shot lead into Sunday’s final round on the Old Course after a 7-under 65 in the third round on the same links.

 

“My confidence grew each day,” he said. “I was very nervous on the Saturday, probably moreso than on Sunday. I ended up with a three-shot lead but felt like I’d missed an opportunity to really separate myself from the field. I felt like I should have been five or six in front at least and I was a bit worried that that was going to come back a bit to bite me.”

 

After a pair of early three-putts Sunday, Wilson was at risk of letting another opportunity get away from him. He was so focused on trying to hang close playing through the loop that he didn’t even notice his wife and mother-in-law who had traveled to watch him play.

 

“I had no idea she was there,” he said. “(Lauren) was walking around and I never saw her, she was trying to hide. Apparently I stood right next to her and her mum halfway round. Her mum spoke to me, and I completely blanked her. I had no idea she was standing next to me. I was so in the zone and so focused.”

 

That sustained focus paid off. He rolled in two birdie putts on 10 and 11 to get back into contention with the leaders. Then he hit “probably the best shot of my life” from 220 yards to tap-in birdie on 16 to take a one-shot lead. He avoided disaster on the Road Hole 17th with a brilliant pitch from the rough to save par.

 

“That 18th hole I have to admit I was in a different place,” he said. “It was almost an out-of-body experience. I had no sort of feeling left.”

 

When his 15-foot birdie putt on 18 failed to turn into the cup, he tapped in and had to wait for Tommy Fleetwood’s birdie attempt to force a playoff.

 

“I kind of felt like here we go again,” he admitted. “I had the opportunity and didn’t take it. I fully expected Tommy to make his and thought we’d be going for a playoff. That being said I was elated at that stage to know I’d secured my card. I’ve been in that position so many times I was determined not to let another one slip by so I was concentrating on the playoff and getting myself ready for that. And then he missed and I was little in shock. It didn’t compute quick enough before my caddie could grab me and start celebrating. Then it got a bit emotional.”

 

Wilson’s tears flowed even harder when he saw Lauren as he walked toward the famous R&A clubhouse. The moment seemed almost surreal.

 

“I walked off and was looking at the ground in tears and trying to compose myself, and she was standing there,” he said. “It was an amazing experience and I’m really pleased she came up and to be able to share that moment with her was incredible.

 

“If you’d have told me that was going to happen to me and I would win in that fashion, I could have told you that I would have been in bits. It’s been a hard couple of years and to get back and to win that particular tournament at St. Andrews – for me it doesn’t get a whole lot better than that.”

 

But it does get better for the former Jaguar who jumped 636 spots in the world rankings to No. 156. Instead of taking a month off to get ready for another trip to European Q School, Wilson is exempt for the next two seasons starting with this week in the Portugal Masters. Then he’ll play the four European Tour final series events including the WGC tournament in China and the season-ending championship in Dubai. He’s also qualified for next year’s WGC event at Firestone and close to securing a spot in the 2015 Open Championship at St. Andrews.

 

“It’s radically different,” he said of getting his card-carrying life back. “Obviously it opens a lot of doors and opportunities with it. I’m still trying to figure that all out. Looking back it’s incredible that I was at that low point in such a short space of time and I’m now a winner.”

 

What Wilson learned in surviving golf’s wilderness is to take nothing for granted.

 

“I appreciate what we do, what we get given and our lifestyle a lot more after what I’ve been through,” he told the BBC immediately after his victory.

 

He also appreciated the thousands of the texts, emails and social media messages that keep flooding his in-boxes beyond capacity to respond to all of them.

 

“I could never imagine having so much support and congratulations – loads of people getting in touch from Augusta and all over the world,” he said. “I can’t put it into words. It’s incredible.”

Categories: Local

DA seeks death penalty in fatal church shooting

 

The district attorney has filed her intention to seek the death penalty against a Florida man accused of the Aug. 14 shooting outside a Columbia County church.

District Attorney Ashley Wright filed the papers in the case against Daniel Nelson Robinson, 21, of Jacksonville, with the Columbia County Clerk of Court’s office on Oct. 1.

A Columbia County Grand Jury indicted Robinson last month on several charges related to the shooting death of William Roundtree “Bill” DaVitte, 55, of Martinez, and the assault on his wife outside Marvin United Methodist Church. The jury charged Robinson with murder, armed robbery, aggravated assault, hijacking a motor vehicle, possession of a firearm during the commission of a crime and possession of a firearm by a convicted felon, according to the indictment.

In the filing, Wright wrote that she plans to seek the death penalty for the murder charge because the case meets some of the statutory aggravated circumstances the law requires for the death penalty to be considered. Those circumstances listed by Wright are that the shooting was committed during the commission of another capital felony – the armed robbery of DaVitte and his wife – and that Robinson committed the fatal shooting “for the purpose of receiving money or any other thing of monetary value.”

Robinson, who was captured by Florida authorities several hours after the shooting and faces charges there, was extradited back to Columbia County on Sept. 26 to face the most serious charges first, the Columbia County murder charge.

Robinson is being held in the jail without bond.

Authorities said that DaVitte’s wife was sitting in the passenger seat of their 2010 gold Nissan Murano in the parking lot at about 10:30 p.m. when police say Robinson approached her.

“He tapped on the window and demanded she open the door,” Morris said after the incident. “And he started beating her with the handgun.”

DaVitte came running when he heard his wife scream and honk the horn. As he approached, police say Robinson shot him three times. Columbia County Coroner Vernon Collins said he pronounced DaVitte dead at the scene. His wife was treated at Georgia Regents Medical Center for her injuries.

Morris said Robinson fled in the couple’s vehicle.

Morris said they believed Robinson was headed toward Florida and notified Florida authorities about the incident. They spotted the vehicle just before 5 a.m. near Jacksonville and a pursuit ensued, Morris said. Robinson abandoned the vehicle and ran. Authorities set up a perimeter and he was quickly captured.

Robinson has been held by Jacksonville authorities until his extradition.

Categories: Local

DA seeks death penalty in fatal church shooting

 

The district attorney has filed her intention to seek the death penalty against a Florida man accused of the Aug. 14 shooting outside a Columbia County church.

District Attorney Ashley Wright filed the papers in the case against Daniel Nelson Robinson, 21, of Jacksonville, with the Columbia County Clerk of Court’s office on Oct. 1.

A Columbia County Grand Jury indicted Robinson last month on several charges related to the shooting death of William Roundtree “Bill” DaVitte, 55, of Martinez, and the assault on his wife outside Marvin United Methodist Church. The jury charged Robinson with murder, armed robbery, aggravated assault, hijacking a motor vehicle, possession of a firearm during the commission of a crime and possession of a firearm by a convicted felon, according to the indictment.

In the filing, Wright wrote that she plans to seek the death penalty for the murder charge because the case meets some of the statutory aggravated circumstances the law requires for the death penalty to be considered. Those circumstances listed by Wright are that the shooting was committed during the commission of another capital felony – the armed robbery of DaVitte and his wife – and that Robinson committed the fatal shooting “for the purpose of receiving money or any other thing of monetary value.”

Robinson, who was captured by Florida authorities several hours after the shooting and faces charges there, was extradited back to Columbia County on Sept. 26 to face the most serious charges first, the Columbia County murder charge.

Robinson is being held in the jail without bond.

Authorities said that DaVitte’s wife was sitting in the passenger seat of their 2010 gold Nissan Murano in the parking lot at about 10:30 p.m. when police say Robinson approached her.

“He tapped on the window and demanded she open the door,” Morris said after the incident. “And he started beating her with the handgun.”

DaVitte came running when he heard his wife scream and honk the horn. As he approached, police say Robinson shot him three times. Columbia County Coroner Vernon Collins said he pronounced DaVitte dead at the scene. His wife was treated at Georgia Regents Medical Center for her injuries.

Morris said Robinson fled in the couple’s vehicle.

Morris said they believed Robinson was headed toward Florida and notified Florida authorities about the incident. They spotted the vehicle just before 5 a.m. near Jacksonville and a pursuit ensued, Morris said. Robinson abandoned the vehicle and ran. Authorities set up a perimeter and he was quickly captured.

Robinson has been held by Jacksonville authorities until his extradition.

Categories: Local

Fantasy 5 - 10/06/2014

Georgia Lottery - Tue, 10/7/2014 12:00 AM
03-07-09-22-39 Estimated Jackpot: $215,000
Categories: Local

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ARC to honor 1956 championship team

Because the championship year of 1956 has never lost its glory in Richmond Academy football lore, the team will be honored Thursday at the third annual ARC Hall of Fame banquet, where 10 alumni ...
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