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No one injured in Evans fire

No one was injured in a fire that destroyed an Evans home Tuesday night.

A resident of Windmill Plantation called 911 just before 9 p.m. to report a grass fire in the back yard of a home at 946 Windmill Parkway, according to Columbia County Fire Rescue Administrative Chief Jeremy Wallen. Firefighters arrived minutes later and found the entire attic of the house fully involved. The three residents including homeowners Richard and Hae on Davis, were not home at the time.

Firefighters extinguished the fire, but the home was completely destroyed. Firefighters salvaged personal items from the home.

The cause of the fire wasn’t immediately determined, but it began outside the back door, according to Wallen.

The American Red Cross was called to provide temporary housing for the residents.

Categories: Local

Augusta Junior Players to perform Disney's 'Tarzan'

While a lot of little girls dream of being a Disney princess, Lizzie Drake had her eyes on another character.

“I grew up watching Tarzan. It was one of my favorite Disney movies. I loved (Jane) with her intelligence and quirkiness,” said Drake, a rising senior at Harlem High School.

She will play the role of Jane in the Augusta Junior Players production of Tarzan on July 24-26 at Greenbrier High School.

Drake sees Jane as a multi-layered character – refined and “prissy” on one hand, but extremely interested in learning about the world around her.

Drake is one of about 40 actors between the age of 6 and 19 years-old in this production which is true to the Disney film.

It is filled with the familiar Phil Collins’ songs, according to director Laura Butler.

The most challenging roles in this production come from an unlikely source – the chorus.

“We have an ape chorus instead of a human chorus,” Butler said.

And while the chorus members won’t be dressed up in ape costumes, but will wear a tribal attire instead to give the feel of the jungle, they will move like apes and act like
them.

“When they come to rehearsal, it’s a workout,” she said. “They are in a squatting position, and their movement is different.”

To help members of the chorus get into character, she had them research the animals. She wanted them to learn how they slept, how they reacted when threatened and other habits. The members then shared their findings.

Another challenge was the large age range among players, Butler said. But actors, such as Drake, have taken the younger children under their wings.

“I love helping out the little kids,” Drake said. “I feel like a mentor.”

Scenes of when Tarzan and Turk are youngeruse the younger children.

Tarzan will be performed at 7 p.m., Friday and Saturday and at 3 p.m., Sunday at Greenbrier High School. Tickets are $8 for children 12 years-old and younger and $15 for those 13 years-old and older.

For more information on the show, call the Augusta Players at (706) 826-4707.

Categories: Local

Augusta Junior Players to perform Disney's 'Tarzan'

While a lot of little girls dream of being a Disney princess, Lizzie Drake had her eyes on another character.

“I grew up watching Tarzan. It was one of my favorite Disney movies. I loved (Jane) with her intelligence and quirkiness,” said Drake, a rising senior at Harlem High School.

She will play the role of Jane in the Augusta Junior Players production of Tarzan on July 24-26 at Greenbrier High School.

Drake sees Jane as a multi-layered character – refined and “prissy” on one hand, but extremely interested in learning about the world around her.

Drake is one of about 40 actors between the age of 6 and 19 years-old in this production which is true to the Disney film.

It is filled with the familiar Phil Collins’ songs, according to director Laura Butler.

The most challenging roles in this production come from an unlikely source – the chorus.

“We have an ape chorus instead of a human chorus,” Butler said.

And while the chorus members won’t be dressed up in ape costumes, but will wear a tribal attire instead to give the feel of the jungle, they will move like apes and act like
them.

“When they come to rehearsal, it’s a workout,” she said. “They are in a squatting position, and their movement is different.”

To help members of the chorus get into character, she had them research the animals. She wanted them to learn how they slept, how they reacted when threatened and other habits. The members then shared their findings.

Another challenge was the large age range among players, Butler said. But actors, such as Drake, have taken the younger children under their wings.

“I love helping out the little kids,” Drake said. “I feel like a mentor.”

Scenes of when Tarzan and Turk are youngeruse the younger children.

Tarzan will be performed at 7 p.m., Friday and Saturday and at 3 p.m., Sunday at Greenbrier High School. Tickets are $8 for children 12 years-old and younger and $15 for those 13 years-old and older.

For more information on the show, call the Augusta Players at (706) 826-4707.

Categories: Local

Physician indicted for illegally dispensing pain medication

A Columbia County physician was recently indicted after he was charged in March with not being properly licensed to dispense pain medication from his Martinez clinic.

A Columbia County Grand Jury indicted Imo Ndem, 55, on a charge of operating an unlicensed pain management clinic, according to the indictment released
Friday.

Ndem, of Darwood Drive in Grovetown, ran the Pathway to Wellness Center on Old Petersburg
Road.

He was arrested March 17 at his office for a violation of the Georgia Pain management Act. The law, enacted in 2013, was designed to curtail the existence of “pill mills” or pain clinics that dispense prescription painkillers indiscriminately.

A license is required as a pain management clinic if “50 percent or more of the annual patient population was treated for chronic pain for non-terminal conditions by the use of Schedule II or II Controlled Substances,” and Ndem is accused of operating under those circumstances without a license from Sept. 27, 2013, through Oct. 29, 2014, according to the
indictment.

His practice had been under investigation for more than a year and authorities served search warrants on his clinic in October.

Ndem is being held in the Columbia County Detention Center on a $10,100 bond, according to jail records.

Categories: Local

Physician indicted for illegally dispensing pain medication

A Columbia County physician was recently indicted after he was charged in March with not being properly licensed to dispense pain medication from his Martinez clinic.

A Columbia County Grand Jury indicted Imo Ndem, 55, on a charge of operating an unlicensed pain management clinic, according to the indictment released
Friday.

Ndem, of Darwood Drive in Grovetown, ran the Pathway to Wellness Center on Old Petersburg
Road.

He was arrested March 17 at his office for a violation of the Georgia Pain management Act. The law, enacted in 2013, was designed to curtail the existence of “pill mills” or pain clinics that dispense prescription painkillers indiscriminately.

A license is required as a pain management clinic if “50 percent or more of the annual patient population was treated for chronic pain for non-terminal conditions by the use of Schedule II or II Controlled Substances,” and Ndem is accused of operating under those circumstances without a license from Sept. 27, 2013, through Oct. 29, 2014, according to the
indictment.

His practice had been under investigation for more than a year and authorities served search warrants on his clinic in October.

Ndem is being held in the Columbia County Detention Center on a $10,100 bond, according to jail records.

Categories: Local

Man indicted for trying to meet teen for sex

An Aiken man arrested in April on suspicion of trying to meet a teenage girl for sex was recently indicted in Columbia County.

A Columbia County Grand Jury indicted Derek Bryce Merchant, 26, of Kenmont Street, on charges of computer or electronic pornography, obscene contact with a child and criminal attempt to commit aggravated child molestation, according to the indictment released Friday.

Merchant was arrested April 28 as part of an undercover investigation to identify people who approach children online in an effort to meet them for sex by the FBI’s Cyber Child Exploitation Task Force. He was apprehended at an undisclosed Columbia County location, where he believed he was meeting a 14-year-old girl for sex.

Merchants is being held in the Columbia County Detention Center without bond, according to jail records.

Categories: Local

Man indicted for trying to meet teen for sex

An Aiken man arrested in April on suspicion of trying to meet a teenage girl for sex was recently indicted in Columbia County.

A Columbia County Grand Jury indicted Derek Bryce Merchant, 26, of Kenmont Street, on charges of computer or electronic pornography, obscene contact with a child and criminal attempt to commit aggravated child molestation, according to the indictment released Friday.

Merchant was arrested April 28 as part of an undercover investigation to identify people who approach children online in an effort to meet them for sex by the FBI’s Cyber Child Exploitation Task Force. He was apprehended at an undisclosed Columbia County location, where he believed he was meeting a 14-year-old girl for sex.

Merchants is being held in the Columbia County Detention Center without bond, according to jail records.

Categories: Local

Police Blotter

The following accounts were taken from Columbia County Sheriff’s Office incident reports:

 

Janitor reports intruders

A janitor working inside an Evans medical building early Friday called authorities after hearing what she believed was intruders in the offices.

The janitor said she was inside University Complex on Towne Centre Drive between
10 p.m. Thursday and 3:20 a.m. Friday. She heard someone knock on the door of Suite 3200, but found no one there.

About 1 a.m., the janitor said she found a small pistol replica that appeared to have come off a key chain, laying on the floor of an exam room in, Suite 3000, Augusta Foot and Ankle, and a green Latex glove in the trash can of that room. The items were not there when the janitor inspected the room when she arrived, but were there when she returned with a vacuum cleaner.

About 2:30 a.m., the janitor said she heard knocking on the door of Suite 3000. A few minutes later, she heard a cellphone ringing, but it was quickly silenced. The janitor heard a door slam right after that.

 

Man returns, steals lost iPad

A woman said someone returned an iPad her son lost in a Martinez restaurant Sunday, then stole it.

The woman said she was in Monterrey’s restaurant at about 7 p.m. and brought an iPad for her 7-year-old son to play with. As they were leaving, the woman said she noticed her son didn’t have the iPad and asked a staff member if anyone turned it in.

The staffer said someone turned the iPad in, but then came back and took it.

The staffer said a man in his mid 30s with short gray hair brought an iPad to the front desk stating it was lost. She put it behind the counter. Several minutes later, the man returned and demanded the iPad back.

The staffer said she refused, but the man began making a scene, so she gave it to him. The man told her he wanted to ensure it got back to the rightful owner, so he left a note with the name Jose Ortiz and a phone number.

A deputy tried to call Ortiz, but the number belonged to a man in Hinesville, Ga., who said he didn’t know Ortiz.

 

Man reports stolen SUV

A Martinez man said a friend he drank with stole his SUV early Friday.

The 46-year-old man said his friend and coworker came to his home the previous evening to hang out and drink. During that time, the man said his friend told him about a place in Waynesboro, Ga., that can “chop” cars.

The man said his friend left and he went to sleep. The man heard a noise at about 7 a.m., but assumed it was his sister. When he woke at about 8:15 a.m., the man said the front door was cracked open, and the keys to his 2001 Chevrolet Tahoe that were left on a table in the living room and the vehicle were missing along with a water jug containing about $1,500 in change and gold coins. His paint machine and tools were untouched inside the home.

The man said he couldn’t reach his friend. Both he and his friend recently got jobs at the same plant. A deputy tried to get information from a plant representative, but she refused.

 

Woman reports scammer

A Harlem woman told deputies Friday that she wasn’t fooled by scammers pretending to be with the IRS.

The woman said she got a voice message on her cellphone from a man with a foreign accent who claimed to be with the IRS. The caller told the woman she owed $2,500 to the IRS and an officer would be at her home to arrest her if she didn’t pay.

The woman said she received no paperwork stating she owed money to the IRS and asked the caller to send her some. The caller refused and wouldn’t give her any more information. The woman never gave the caller any personal information and was told the call was a scam and not to send any money.

Categories: Local

Police Blotter

The following accounts were taken from Columbia County Sheriff’s Office incident reports:

 

Janitor reports intruders

A janitor working inside an Evans medical building early Friday called authorities after hearing what she believed was intruders in the offices.

The janitor said she was inside University Complex on Towne Centre Drive between
10 p.m. Thursday and 3:20 a.m. Friday. She heard someone knock on the door of Suite 3200, but found no one there.

About 1 a.m., the janitor said she found a small pistol replica that appeared to have come off a key chain, laying on the floor of an exam room in, Suite 3000, Augusta Foot and Ankle, and a green Latex glove in the trash can of that room. The items were not there when the janitor inspected the room when she arrived, but were there when she returned with a vacuum cleaner.

About 2:30 a.m., the janitor said she heard knocking on the door of Suite 3000. A few minutes later, she heard a cellphone ringing, but it was quickly silenced. The janitor heard a door slam right after that.

 

Man returns, steals lost iPad

A woman said someone returned an iPad her son lost in a Martinez restaurant Sunday, then stole it.

The woman said she was in Monterrey’s restaurant at about 7 p.m. and brought an iPad for her 7-year-old son to play with. As they were leaving, the woman said she noticed her son didn’t have the iPad and asked a staff member if anyone turned it in.

The staffer said someone turned the iPad in, but then came back and took it.

The staffer said a man in his mid 30s with short gray hair brought an iPad to the front desk stating it was lost. She put it behind the counter. Several minutes later, the man returned and demanded the iPad back.

The staffer said she refused, but the man began making a scene, so she gave it to him. The man told her he wanted to ensure it got back to the rightful owner, so he left a note with the name Jose Ortiz and a phone number.

A deputy tried to call Ortiz, but the number belonged to a man in Hinesville, Ga., who said he didn’t know Ortiz.

 

Man reports stolen SUV

A Martinez man said a friend he drank with stole his SUV early Friday.

The 46-year-old man said his friend and coworker came to his home the previous evening to hang out and drink. During that time, the man said his friend told him about a place in Waynesboro, Ga., that can “chop” cars.

The man said his friend left and he went to sleep. The man heard a noise at about 7 a.m., but assumed it was his sister. When he woke at about 8:15 a.m., the man said the front door was cracked open, and the keys to his 2001 Chevrolet Tahoe that were left on a table in the living room and the vehicle were missing along with a water jug containing about $1,500 in change and gold coins. His paint machine and tools were untouched inside the home.

The man said he couldn’t reach his friend. Both he and his friend recently got jobs at the same plant. A deputy tried to get information from a plant representative, but she refused.

 

Woman reports scammer

A Harlem woman told deputies Friday that she wasn’t fooled by scammers pretending to be with the IRS.

The woman said she got a voice message on her cellphone from a man with a foreign accent who claimed to be with the IRS. The caller told the woman she owed $2,500 to the IRS and an officer would be at her home to arrest her if she didn’t pay.

The woman said she received no paperwork stating she owed money to the IRS and asked the caller to send her some. The caller refused and wouldn’t give her any more information. The woman never gave the caller any personal information and was told the call was a scam and not to send any money.

Categories: Local

Richmond County sheriff's deputy cleared of rape accusations

A Richmond County sheriff’s deputy accused of raping a woman in April has been cleared, authorities said Friday.

The 33-year-old woman told Columbia County sheriff’s investigators that Richmond County sheriff’s Cpl. Jason Turner raped her at his Martinez home April 9 and took photos of her with his phone.

The Columbia County sheriff’s office investigated the accusations while Richmond County opened an internal investigation into the officer’s conduct. Because of lack of evidence, the officer was not charged and remained on active duty.

A rape kit was completed and sent to the Georgia Bureau of Investigation for analysis. The results came back negative last week.

“There is no evidence that a sexual assault or any crime occurred,” Columbia County sheriff’s Capt. Steve Morris said Friday.

Investigators do not plan to charge the woman with filing a false report, he said. The case has been closed and Turner has been notified of the findings. The Richmond County Sheriff’s Office has also closed its internal investigation, Lt. Allan Rollins confirmed.

Reports show this was not the first time the victim has accused someone of rape.

Last year, the woman told police that a friend had raped her while they were staying together in a hotel room five months earlier. No charges were filed in that report.

In February, the woman reported her husband and mother-in-law attacked her. She told police that her husband punched her in the face, threw her down, kicked her and slammed her head into a door. Police found a small scratch on her forehead.

The husband, who told police that he was seeking a divorce, stated that she attacked him and in the process fell and hit her head.

An hour later, the woman called police on her mother-in-law, who she claimed struck her.

Charges were never filed against her husband or mother-in-law.

Categories: Local

Richmond County sheriff's deputy cleared of rape accusations

A Richmond County sheriff’s deputy accused of raping a woman in April has been cleared, authorities said Friday.

The 33-year-old woman told Columbia County sheriff’s investigators that Richmond County sheriff’s Cpl. Jason Turner raped her at his Martinez home April 9 and took photos of her with his phone.

The Columbia County sheriff’s office investigated the accusations while Richmond County opened an internal investigation into the officer’s conduct. Because of lack of evidence, the officer was not charged and remained on active duty.

A rape kit was completed and sent to the Georgia Bureau of Investigation for analysis. The results came back negative last week.

“There is no evidence that a sexual assault or any crime occurred,” Columbia County sheriff’s Capt. Steve Morris said Friday.

Investigators do not plan to charge the woman with filing a false report, he said. The case has been closed and Turner has been notified of the findings. The Richmond County Sheriff’s Office has also closed its internal investigation, Lt. Allan Rollins confirmed.

Reports show this was not the first time the victim has accused someone of rape.

Last year, the woman told police that a friend had raped her while they were staying together in a hotel room five months earlier. No charges were filed in that report.

In February, the woman reported her husband and mother-in-law attacked her. She told police that her husband punched her in the face, threw her down, kicked her and slammed her head into a door. Police found a small scratch on her forehead.

The husband, who told police that he was seeking a divorce, stated that she attacked him and in the process fell and hit her head.

An hour later, the woman called police on her mother-in-law, who she claimed struck her.

Charges were never filed against her husband or mother-in-law.

Categories: Local

Philadelphia United Methodist Church in Harlem recalls past through stories

Not much is known about the history of Philadelphia United Methodist Church. But the small, white country church, set slightly off Old Louisville Road in Harlem, is full of stories of former members of its congregation.

What is known is that the church was originally organized in 1840 as Rocky Mount, and met in a building three times the size of the current church on a site just a little down the road, said historian Allen Connor.

“We have no documentation of that church,” he said, adding that any documentation that existed was destroyed or lost before the Civil War.

The current church building sits on land donated by church member George B. Magruder just after the Civil War. (His granddaughter still attends.) The church possesses the original deed, dated 1888.

Connor, who has been a member of the church for 54 years, remembers when the church was smaller and did not have air conditioning or indoor plumbing.

“We had no running water in the church until the 1970s,” he said. “If you needed water, there was a spring down in the woods, and people would go to the spring to get water to give their horses or to use in the church.”

Neither the road nor parking lot was paved, and churchgoers would tie their horses to the trees while they were at services.

In his mother’s day, a pot-bellied stove in the middle of the sanctuary kept the place warm, and Sunday school was taught in three curtained-off rooms.

“We probably have more cute stories than we do actual history,” Connor said.

For instance, two sisters – Ms. Maude Sullivan and Ms. Mamie Marshall – taught Sunday school in those curtained rooms.

Before the church had running water, the sisters brought grape juice in mason jars for communion. At least, that’s what the congregation always thought they’d been drinking.

“One of the ministers in the early 1960s, C.W. Ed­wards, tells the story that the first time he gave communion here, he went to drink the grape juice,’’ Connor said.

It was not grape juice. It was homemade elderberry wine that the sisters had made.”

When he was a child, Connor took music lessons from Dorothy Linder, the pianist. He remembers digging the skeleton key out from under a brick in the steps to open the door.

For years, Linder let her dog, Rover, join her in the sanctuary while she taught lessons and practiced Sunday’s music.

“One tradition that’s been there since the Civil War is every second Sunday there has been a covered dish fellowship,” Connor said.

The church did not have a kitchen until it was renovated in the 1970s. The dinners would be laid out on concrete tables under the trees on the church grounds. Those tables, built sometime in the 1930s, still stand. A ring of thick tree stumps is nearby and classes will sometimes hold Bible study there.

The church was renovated in 2004 to expand the sanctuary. The wall was knocked down between the sanctuary and the fellowship hall to create a new altar and choir loft. Stained glass was purchased by members of the congregation in honor of different families in the church.

The expansion doubled the seating capacity in the sanctuary. It can now accommodate between 150 and 200 people and a baby grand piano, which the church raised funds for 25 years to purchase.

In a hallway at the back of the church, which holds offices and classrooms, is a history cabinet with items from the church’s past, including communion trays, offering plates and church fans dating from the 1930s.

Connor said the church has always been, and still is, a tight-knit congregation that looks out for one another in times of need.

“It’s always been a church of fellowship in the community,” he said. “It’s very much a rural community church.”

Categories: Local

Philadelphia United Methodist Church in Harlem recalls past through stories

Not much is known about the history of Philadelphia United Methodist Church. But the small, white country church, set slightly off Old Louisville Road in Harlem, is full of stories of former members of its congregation.

What is known is that the church was originally organized in 1840 as Rocky Mount, and met in a building three times the size of the current church on a site just a little down the road, said historian Allen Connor.

“We have no documentation of that church,” he said, adding that any documentation that existed was destroyed or lost before the Civil War.

The current church building sits on land donated by church member George B. Magruder just after the Civil War. (His granddaughter still attends.) The church possesses the original deed, dated 1888.

Connor, who has been a member of the church for 54 years, remembers when the church was smaller and did not have air conditioning or indoor plumbing.

“We had no running water in the church until the 1970s,” he said. “If you needed water, there was a spring down in the woods, and people would go to the spring to get water to give their horses or to use in the church.”

Neither the road nor parking lot was paved, and churchgoers would tie their horses to the trees while they were at services.

In his mother’s day, a pot-bellied stove in the middle of the sanctuary kept the place warm, and Sunday school was taught in three curtained-off rooms.

“We probably have more cute stories than we do actual history,” Connor said.

For instance, two sisters – Ms. Maude Sullivan and Ms. Mamie Marshall – taught Sunday school in those curtained rooms.

Before the church had running water, the sisters brought grape juice in mason jars for communion. At least, that’s what the congregation always thought they’d been drinking.

“One of the ministers in the early 1960s, C.W. Ed­wards, tells the story that the first time he gave communion here, he went to drink the grape juice,’’ Connor said.

It was not grape juice. It was homemade elderberry wine that the sisters had made.”

When he was a child, Connor took music lessons from Dorothy Linder, the pianist. He remembers digging the skeleton key out from under a brick in the steps to open the door.

For years, Linder let her dog, Rover, join her in the sanctuary while she taught lessons and practiced Sunday’s music.

“One tradition that’s been there since the Civil War is every second Sunday there has been a covered dish fellowship,” Connor said.

The church did not have a kitchen until it was renovated in the 1970s. The dinners would be laid out on concrete tables under the trees on the church grounds. Those tables, built sometime in the 1930s, still stand. A ring of thick tree stumps is nearby and classes will sometimes hold Bible study there.

The church was renovated in 2004 to expand the sanctuary. The wall was knocked down between the sanctuary and the fellowship hall to create a new altar and choir loft. Stained glass was purchased by members of the congregation in honor of different families in the church.

The expansion doubled the seating capacity in the sanctuary. It can now accommodate between 150 and 200 people and a baby grand piano, which the church raised funds for 25 years to purchase.

In a hallway at the back of the church, which holds offices and classrooms, is a history cabinet with items from the church’s past, including communion trays, offering plates and church fans dating from the 1930s.

Connor said the church has always been, and still is, a tight-knit congregation that looks out for one another in times of need.

“It’s always been a church of fellowship in the community,” he said. “It’s very much a rural community church.”

Categories: Local

Pet Adoptions

Categories: Local

Look out below!

Categories: Local

Current Events

Rio

Family Movie Matinee 12:30 p.m. today, Jabez Sanford Hardin Performing Arts Center, 7022 Evans Town Center Blvd., Evans; doors open noon, movie begins 12:30 p.m.; free; limited seating; ages 12 and under must be accompanied by an adult; (706) 650-5005, bit.ly/1JVmmu0

Resource expo

Caregiver resource expo 9 a.m.-noon Thursday, July 23, Warren Baptist Church, Simmons Hall, 3203 Washington Road; a variety of local community resources available with vendor tables covering hospice, home health, medical supplies and Alzheimer’s and caregiver support groups; presented by Area Agency on Aging and Warren Baptist Church; free; warrenbaptist.org/mature-adults

Job fair

Department of Juvenile Justice Augusta Job Fair 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday, July 23, Augusta Youth Development Campus, 3485 Mike Padgett Highway; on-the-spot interviews for Juvenile Corrections Officer 1 and 2 positions; check online for changes and updates; djjcareers.org

Evans reunion

Evans High School Class of 1995 20-year reunion 8 p.m. Saturday, July 25, Sky City, 1157 Broad St.; facebook.com/groups/540227086028851

Sizzling Summer

The Remedy Band performing as part of the Sizzling Summer Music Series 5:30 p.m. Sunday, July 26, Columbia County Amphitheater, 7022 Evans Town Center Blvd., Evans; $6; bit.ly/1It0eXN

GOP meeting

CSRA Republican Women’s monthly meeting Tuesday, July 28, Logan’s Roadhouse, 269 Robert C. Daniel Jr. Parkway; District Attorney Ashley Wright, speaker; social/dinner 6-7 p.m., business meeting 7 p.m.; free, dinner optional

Workshop

Small Business Workshop 9 a.m.-noon Wednesday, July 29, Columbia County Chamber of Commerce, 1000 Business Blvd., Evans; Grow Your Business with Email & Social Media; simple marketing strategy for small businesses and nonprofits; learn how to make the most of the combination of e-mail and social media for business; Constant Constant, presenter; free; columbiacountychamber.com

Block party

Block Party, Concert with Canton Jones 4 p.m. Wednesday, July 29, Green Branch Baptist Church, 974 Augusta Highway, Thomson; school supply giveaway; children’s activities; bring canned food or nonperishable items to be entered to win $100 gift card; rbimin.org

Community meeting

Community Meeting for Public to Voice Concerns on Regional Transportation System 5:30-7:30 p.m. Thursday, July 30, Columbia County Government Complex Auditorium, 630 Ronald Reagan Drive, Evans; voice opinions on the recommended Transportation Vision 2040 Plan and the FY 2015-2016 Transportation Improvement Program for the Augusta Regional Transportation Study; www.augustaga.gov/arts

Benefit ride

Ride For Recovery and Benefit Concert 9 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 1, Augusta Harley-Davidson, 4200 Belair Frontage Road; benefits Souls of Sobriety and Bridges of Hope; registration 9-11 a.m., kick stands up 11:30 a.m.; ride to Bridges of Hope in Louisville, Ga.; arrive approximately 12:30 p.m.; activities, refreshments and music by George Croft and the Vellotones at Bridges of Hope following ride; $25 plus $5 per passenger; (706) 829-6396, (706) 312-4933

Storks and Kites

Augusta-Aiken Audubon field trip 8 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 1, Silver Bluff Audubon Sanctuary, meet at Kathwood Ponds; view wood storks at Silver Bluff, then drive to Allendale to look for swallow-tailed Kites; beginners welcome; free; augustaaikenaudubon.org

Sizzling Summer

Lenwood Holmes and The Sounds Unlimited performing as part of the Sizzling Summer Music Series 5:30 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 2, Columbia County Amphitheater, 7022 Evans Town Center Blvd., Evans; $6; bit.ly/1R4rEsB

Book club

Discussing One Nation Under God: How Corporate America Invented Christian America by Kevin M. Kruse 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 5, Columbia County Library, second floor, 7022 Evans Town Center Blvd., Evans; copies available at The Book Tavern; amunitedcsra.org/bookclub

Book sale Friends of the Columbia County Libraries Book Sale 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday- Saturday, Aug. 7-8, 2-4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 9, Columbia County Library, second floor, 7022 Evans Town Center Blvd., Evans; fiction and nonfiction Storks, Corks

Storks and Corks 2015 6-9 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 8, Silver Bluff Audubon Sanctuary, 4542 Silver Bluff Road, Jackson; casual dress, food, wine; chance to see endangered Wood Storks in natural setting; silent auction; $50, reservations required; (803) 471-0291, pkoehler@audubon.org, sc.audubon.org/events/storks-corks

Sizzling Summer

Doc Easton performing as part of the Sizzling Summer Music Series 5:30 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 9, Columbia County Amphitheater, 7022 Evans Town Center Blvd., Evans; $6; bit.ly/1dxpvmH

Driving tour

Augusta-Aiken Audubon driving field trip at Phinizy Swamp Nature Park 8 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 15, 1858 Lock and Dam Road; drive around Phinizy looking for post-breeding birds and wading birds that come in late summer; beginners welcome; free; augustaaikenaudubon.org

Candlelight

Candlelight Wine & Dine: eZra Brown 6-8 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 15, Columbia County Amphitheater, 7022 Evans Town Center Blvd., Evans; gates open 5 p.m., concert 6 p.m.; bring seating and picnic; $10 advance, $15 day of show; (762) 233-5299, wineanddine15.bpt.me

Conference

Women’s Conference: The Refiner’s, Oakey Grove Baptist Church, 911 N. Belair Road, Evans; praise and worship 6:30 p.m. Aug. 14; workshops 8:30 a.m. Aug. 15, topics: Preparation for the Fire, Standing in the Fire and No Smell of Smoke; worship 10:15 a.m. Aug. 16, Sharon Riddle; free

Meet writer

Meet Jeffrey Selman, author of God Sent Me: A textbook case on evolution vs. creation, 3 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 16, Columbia County Library meeting room, 7022 Evans Town Center Blvd., Evans; copies of book available $15, cash or check; bit.ly/1dvb1ni

Categories: Local

Current Events

Rio

Family Movie Matinee 12:30 p.m. today, Jabez Sanford Hardin Performing Arts Center, 7022 Evans Town Center Blvd., Evans; doors open noon, movie begins 12:30 p.m.; free; limited seating; ages 12 and under must be accompanied by an adult; (706) 650-5005, bit.ly/1JVmmu0

Resource expo

Caregiver resource expo 9 a.m.-noon Thursday, July 23, Warren Baptist Church, Simmons Hall, 3203 Washington Road; a variety of local community resources available with vendor tables covering hospice, home health, medical supplies and Alzheimer’s and caregiver support groups; presented by Area Agency on Aging and Warren Baptist Church; free; warrenbaptist.org/mature-adults

Job fair

Department of Juvenile Justice Augusta Job Fair 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday, July 23, Augusta Youth Development Campus, 3485 Mike Padgett Highway; on-the-spot interviews for Juvenile Corrections Officer 1 and 2 positions; check online for changes and updates; djjcareers.org

Evans reunion

Evans High School Class of 1995 20-year reunion 8 p.m. Saturday, July 25, Sky City, 1157 Broad St.; facebook.com/groups/540227086028851

Sizzling Summer

The Remedy Band performing as part of the Sizzling Summer Music Series 5:30 p.m. Sunday, July 26, Columbia County Amphitheater, 7022 Evans Town Center Blvd., Evans; $6; bit.ly/1It0eXN

GOP meeting

CSRA Republican Women’s monthly meeting Tuesday, July 28, Logan’s Roadhouse, 269 Robert C. Daniel Jr. Parkway; District Attorney Ashley Wright, speaker; social/dinner 6-7 p.m., business meeting 7 p.m.; free, dinner optional

Workshop

Small Business Workshop 9 a.m.-noon Wednesday, July 29, Columbia County Chamber of Commerce, 1000 Business Blvd., Evans; Grow Your Business with Email & Social Media; simple marketing strategy for small businesses and nonprofits; learn how to make the most of the combination of e-mail and social media for business; Constant Constant, presenter; free; columbiacountychamber.com

Block party

Block Party, Concert with Canton Jones 4 p.m. Wednesday, July 29, Green Branch Baptist Church, 974 Augusta Highway, Thomson; school supply giveaway; children’s activities; bring canned food or nonperishable items to be entered to win $100 gift card; rbimin.org

Community meeting

Community Meeting for Public to Voice Concerns on Regional Transportation System 5:30-7:30 p.m. Thursday, July 30, Columbia County Government Complex Auditorium, 630 Ronald Reagan Drive, Evans; voice opinions on the recommended Transportation Vision 2040 Plan and the FY 2015-2016 Transportation Improvement Program for the Augusta Regional Transportation Study; www.augustaga.gov/arts

Benefit ride

Ride For Recovery and Benefit Concert 9 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 1, Augusta Harley-Davidson, 4200 Belair Frontage Road; benefits Souls of Sobriety and Bridges of Hope; registration 9-11 a.m., kick stands up 11:30 a.m.; ride to Bridges of Hope in Louisville, Ga.; arrive approximately 12:30 p.m.; activities, refreshments and music by George Croft and the Vellotones at Bridges of Hope following ride; $25 plus $5 per passenger; (706) 829-6396, (706) 312-4933

Storks and Kites

Augusta-Aiken Audubon field trip 8 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 1, Silver Bluff Audubon Sanctuary, meet at Kathwood Ponds; view wood storks at Silver Bluff, then drive to Allendale to look for swallow-tailed Kites; beginners welcome; free; augustaaikenaudubon.org

Sizzling Summer

Lenwood Holmes and The Sounds Unlimited performing as part of the Sizzling Summer Music Series 5:30 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 2, Columbia County Amphitheater, 7022 Evans Town Center Blvd., Evans; $6; bit.ly/1R4rEsB

Book club

Discussing One Nation Under God: How Corporate America Invented Christian America by Kevin M. Kruse 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 5, Columbia County Library, second floor, 7022 Evans Town Center Blvd., Evans; copies available at The Book Tavern; amunitedcsra.org/bookclub

Book sale Friends of the Columbia County Libraries Book Sale 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday- Saturday, Aug. 7-8, 2-4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 9, Columbia County Library, second floor, 7022 Evans Town Center Blvd., Evans; fiction and nonfiction Storks, Corks

Storks and Corks 2015 6-9 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 8, Silver Bluff Audubon Sanctuary, 4542 Silver Bluff Road, Jackson; casual dress, food, wine; chance to see endangered Wood Storks in natural setting; silent auction; $50, reservations required; (803) 471-0291, pkoehler@audubon.org, sc.audubon.org/events/storks-corks

Sizzling Summer

Doc Easton performing as part of the Sizzling Summer Music Series 5:30 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 9, Columbia County Amphitheater, 7022 Evans Town Center Blvd., Evans; $6; bit.ly/1dxpvmH

Driving tour

Augusta-Aiken Audubon driving field trip at Phinizy Swamp Nature Park 8 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 15, 1858 Lock and Dam Road; drive around Phinizy looking for post-breeding birds and wading birds that come in late summer; beginners welcome; free; augustaaikenaudubon.org

Candlelight

Candlelight Wine & Dine: eZra Brown 6-8 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 15, Columbia County Amphitheater, 7022 Evans Town Center Blvd., Evans; gates open 5 p.m., concert 6 p.m.; bring seating and picnic; $10 advance, $15 day of show; (762) 233-5299, wineanddine15.bpt.me

Conference

Women’s Conference: The Refiner’s, Oakey Grove Baptist Church, 911 N. Belair Road, Evans; praise and worship 6:30 p.m. Aug. 14; workshops 8:30 a.m. Aug. 15, topics: Preparation for the Fire, Standing in the Fire and No Smell of Smoke; worship 10:15 a.m. Aug. 16, Sharon Riddle; free

Meet writer

Meet Jeffrey Selman, author of God Sent Me: A textbook case on evolution vs. creation, 3 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 16, Columbia County Library meeting room, 7022 Evans Town Center Blvd., Evans; copies of book available $15, cash or check; bit.ly/1dvb1ni

Categories: Local

Mega Millions - 07/21/2015

Georgia Lottery - Wed, 7/22/2015 12:00 AM
20-30-62-65-74 Mega Ball: 01 Megaplier: 5X Estimated Jackpot: $15 Million
Categories: Local
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