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Columbia County Chamber plans for new headquarters in Evans

The Columbia County Chamber of Commerce has its sights set on a new home.

The Chamber closed July 7 on an acre of land in the heart of Evans that where it intends to build a 10,000-square-foot building for it future office space, according to Tammy Shepherd, president and CEO of the Columbia County Chamber.

The nonprofit entity has been leasing space in a county-owned building on Business Boulevard since September 2012, and that lease agreement is set to expire in 2017.

Shepherd said the Chamber is quickly outgrowing that space and formed a committee earlier this year to explore options, including buying land and constructing a new office.

“I need meeting space bigger than this, and I need offices and more offices to grow,” she said, explaining that in the past seven years she has doubled her staff and her annual budget. She anticipates that trend will continue in coming years as the county grows and more businesses come to the greater Augusta area. About 40 percent of the Chamber’s membership is from outside Columbia County.

The proposed site for the new building is a residential property at the corner of Washington Road and Sir Galahad Drive, at the entrance to the Camelot subdivision. Shepherd said the chamber plans to apply for rezoning to allow for construction of a two-story office building with enough parking space for at least 50 vehicles.

Shephard said their goal was to remain in the Evans Town Center area, but most of the existing commercial lots range from $750,000 to $1 million, which was out of the nonprofit’s price range.

When she spotted a “for sale” on the property in May, Shepherd had found a solution. The land sold for $177,000, she said.

“If you think of Washington Road, it is the business corridor for all of the area,” she said “To me, that was the perfect location.”

Columbia County Planning Director Andrew Strickland said the group has yet to file any plans or submit an application for the rezoning, which will require a public hearing. While he could not speculate on the potential to rezone this tract, Strickland said the such things as future land use maps and impact on nearby property owners are things that will have to be considered.

“Is it something that surrounding property owners could potentially be OK with, because the public hearing obviously play as large role,” he said.

Shepherd said she has been speaking with property owners in the Camelot neighborhood to gauge their reaction to the rezoning and intends to invite all residents to a Sept. 10 cookout, where all will have a chance to get their questions answered.

Categories: Local

Columbia County Chamber plans for new headquarters in Evans

The Columbia County Chamber of Commerce has its sights set on a new home.

The Chamber closed July 7 on an acre of land in the heart of Evans that where it intends to build a 10,000-square-foot building for it future office space, according to Tammy Shepherd, president and CEO of the Columbia County Chamber.

The nonprofit entity has been leasing space in a county-owned building on Business Boulevard since September 2012, and that lease agreement is set to expire in 2017.

Shepherd said the Chamber is quickly outgrowing that space and formed a committee earlier this year to explore options, including buying land and constructing a new office.

“I need meeting space bigger than this, and I need offices and more offices to grow,” she said, explaining that in the past seven years she has doubled her staff and her annual budget. She anticipates that trend will continue in coming years as the county grows and more businesses come to the greater Augusta area. About 40 percent of the Chamber’s membership is from outside Columbia County.

The proposed site for the new building is a residential property at the corner of Washington Road and Sir Galahad Drive, at the entrance to the Camelot subdivision. Shepherd said the chamber plans to apply for rezoning to allow for construction of a two-story office building with enough parking space for at least 50 vehicles.

Shephard said their goal was to remain in the Evans Town Center area, but most of the existing commercial lots range from $750,000 to $1 million, which was out of the nonprofit’s price range.

When she spotted a “for sale” on the property in May, Shepherd had found a solution. The land sold for $177,000, she said.

“If you think of Washington Road, it is the business corridor for all of the area,” she said “To me, that was the perfect location.”

Columbia County Planning Director Andrew Strickland said the group has yet to file any plans or submit an application for the rezoning, which will require a public hearing. While he could not speculate on the potential to rezone this tract, Strickland said the such things as future land use maps and impact on nearby property owners are things that will have to be considered.

“Is it something that surrounding property owners could potentially be OK with, because the public hearing obviously play as large role,” he said.

Shepherd said she has been speaking with property owners in the Camelot neighborhood to gauge their reaction to the rezoning and intends to invite all residents to a Sept. 10 cookout, where all will have a chance to get their questions answered.

Categories: Local

Police Blotter

The following accounts were taken from Columbia County Sheriff’s Office incident reports:

 

Elderly women scammed

Two elderly Columbia County women told police Friday that men came to their homes and stole from them.

An 85-year-old Harlem woman said three Asian men pulled up to her home at about 2 p.m. Thursday in a gray Chevrolet Silverado. One of the men said they needed to look at her roof to see if it needs replacing. One of them walked through her home and out the back door to look at the roof in the back of the home while the other two waited outside. After he looked at the roof, the man and his colleagues got back into the truck and left.

When the woman went to her bedroom, she discovered $3,325 worth of jewelry missing from her dresser.

An 86-year-old Evans woman said she’d been getting statements from what she believed was the Columbia County Water Utility about obtaining a water sample from her home because the county purchased a portion of her property. On Friday, two Hispanic men came to her home and said they needed to collect water samples. The men wore golf polo shirts. She believes they arrived in a white truck with a blue stripe.

The woman said she wasn’t alarmed until the men started asking questions including if she lived alone and how often her grandson was at the home. They said the water faucets needed to run for six minutes before they could take a sample. In hindsight, the woman said she should have kept a better eye on them as they split up and went about her house.

After the men left, she found her mattress pulled away from the wall and the base of her bed moved. A watch was missing from an unlocked lock box in her grandson’s room and his room was obviously shuffled through. The area where she keeps her mail had also been shuffled through and she was concerned with bank information the men could possibly use fraudulently.

 

Woman’s home is vandalized

A Martinez woman said early Saturday that her daughter’s boyfriend vandalized her home, which he was moving from.

The 42-year-old woman called authorities to the home at about 1 a.m. after having an argument with her daughter’s boyfriend. She said he was intoxicated and screaming at her. He said they were arguing about moving out of the house they shared and he didn’t want her around him while they moved. The woman agreed to stay at her other daughter’s home for the night while the couple packed their belongings.

Deputies responded to the home again at about 10:45 a.m. because the woman said her daughter’s boyfriend vandalized the house. She said her other daughter’s boyfriend noticed the vandalism and called her.

The responding deputy could see through an open window into the bedroom the daughter’s boyfriend had moved out of. The door was boarded up from the inside and the furniture was thrown on the ground with trash scattered around the room.

Tiles were glued to the wall spelling the word “slut” and someone tiled over the light switch. The deputy went into the room and saw couches and other living room furniture stacked up against the door to prevent anyone from coming in.

The kitchen cabinets had been glued shut, tile was torn up in the bathroom and shelves in the bathroom were torn off. In the backyard, doors were ripped off the shed.

 

Woman discovers credit card fraud

A Grovetown woman told police Thursday that someone used her personal information to open and use a credit card.

The 42-year-old woman said that when she got home from work at about 7:30 p.m., there was a message on her answering machine from a Discover representative, who stated there was fraudulent activity on her account and she needed to contact the company immediately. She was skeptical because she doesn’t have a Discover card. She called the number provided and spoke to someone who wanted her to provide her mother’entire Social Security number as verification. She gave her maiden name, but would only give the last four digits of her Social Security number.

The representative told the woman they couldn’t discuss the account unless she gave the entire number.

The woman hung up and looked up a direct phone number for Discover. When she called, the woman was able to verify her identity with the last four digits of her Social Security number and her mother’s maiden name. The birthday on file for the account was Sept. 7, 1972, which is close, but not the woman’s correct birthday.

The Discover representative told the woman that there was about $3,000 worth of charges to the account, including multiple $480 cash withdrawals at different ATMs. The representative couldn’t discuss the other charges with the woman. But she called back with a deputy in the room and got information about when the account was opened and used.

All the charges and cash withdrawals were made in the Atlanta area. On Aug. 17, someone attempted to buy $1,517.85 worth of groceries from an Atlanta Kroger, but the card was declined and the account flagged.

The woman froze the account.

 

Man scammed
on Craig’s List

A Columbia County man called authorities Thursday stating he’d been scammed trying to buy gift cards through online site www.craigslist.com.

The 38-year-old man said that he’d bought some gift cards that were later emptied before he could use them. He met another man who had advertised some gift cards for sale at the Steak and Shake on Aug. 12. After verifying the balances on a Dillard’s card and two Kohls cards totaling $1,100, the man paid the seller $400.

He’d previously messaged the seller that he did not want to get involved with anything illegal. The seller said they were gifts from family and he had another card with a receipt showing its balance at his home. The man agreed to buy the fourth card and went shopping at Kohls.

On Aug. 16, the seller said he found the other Kohls card and provided a receipt that showed it was loaded with $200. The man paid him $75. But when he got home, the man said he noticed that the gift card was purchased with a credit card. He got suspicious and checked the balances on all the cards, which all had zero balances.

The man called the seller, who rambled on about how he applied for the credit card using his father’s Social Security number and that he’d reimburse the man in a few days. When the man said he was calling authorities, the seller said he had no problem and could explain everything.

The man said he wasn’t concerned with getting his money back because he knew the risk of buying items off the site. But he didn’t want to be involved with someone using a stolen Social Security number.

 

Packages stolen
from neighbors

Two Grovetown neighbors told deputies Friday that packages were stolen from their porches.

A 31-year-old resident of High Meadows Drive said she ordered a pair of shoes from www.macys.com and the U.S. Postal Service informed her the shoes were delivered at 12:14 p.m. When she got home at 4 p.m., the package was missing.

The woman’s 51-year-old neighbor also told deputies packages were stolen from his porch. He said one was delivered by the Postal Service at 12:15 p.m. and another was delivered at 12:38 p.m. by UPS. But were stolen from his porch before he returned home at 3:15 p.m.

Categories: Local

Police Blotter

The following accounts were taken from Columbia County Sheriff’s Office incident reports:

 

Elderly women scammed

Two elderly Columbia County women told police Friday that men came to their homes and stole from them.

An 85-year-old Harlem woman said three Asian men pulled up to her home at about 2 p.m. Thursday in a gray Chevrolet Silverado. One of the men said they needed to look at her roof to see if it needs replacing. One of them walked through her home and out the back door to look at the roof in the back of the home while the other two waited outside. After he looked at the roof, the man and his colleagues got back into the truck and left.

When the woman went to her bedroom, she discovered $3,325 worth of jewelry missing from her dresser.

An 86-year-old Evans woman said she’d been getting statements from what she believed was the Columbia County Water Utility about obtaining a water sample from her home because the county purchased a portion of her property. On Friday, two Hispanic men came to her home and said they needed to collect water samples. The men wore golf polo shirts. She believes they arrived in a white truck with a blue stripe.

The woman said she wasn’t alarmed until the men started asking questions including if she lived alone and how often her grandson was at the home. They said the water faucets needed to run for six minutes before they could take a sample. In hindsight, the woman said she should have kept a better eye on them as they split up and went about her house.

After the men left, she found her mattress pulled away from the wall and the base of her bed moved. A watch was missing from an unlocked lock box in her grandson’s room and his room was obviously shuffled through. The area where she keeps her mail had also been shuffled through and she was concerned with bank information the men could possibly use fraudulently.

 

Woman’s home is vandalized

A Martinez woman said early Saturday that her daughter’s boyfriend vandalized her home, which he was moving from.

The 42-year-old woman called authorities to the home at about 1 a.m. after having an argument with her daughter’s boyfriend. She said he was intoxicated and screaming at her. He said they were arguing about moving out of the house they shared and he didn’t want her around him while they moved. The woman agreed to stay at her other daughter’s home for the night while the couple packed their belongings.

Deputies responded to the home again at about 10:45 a.m. because the woman said her daughter’s boyfriend vandalized the house. She said her other daughter’s boyfriend noticed the vandalism and called her.

The responding deputy could see through an open window into the bedroom the daughter’s boyfriend had moved out of. The door was boarded up from the inside and the furniture was thrown on the ground with trash scattered around the room.

Tiles were glued to the wall spelling the word “slut” and someone tiled over the light switch. The deputy went into the room and saw couches and other living room furniture stacked up against the door to prevent anyone from coming in.

The kitchen cabinets had been glued shut, tile was torn up in the bathroom and shelves in the bathroom were torn off. In the backyard, doors were ripped off the shed.

 

Woman discovers credit card fraud

A Grovetown woman told police Thursday that someone used her personal information to open and use a credit card.

The 42-year-old woman said that when she got home from work at about 7:30 p.m., there was a message on her answering machine from a Discover representative, who stated there was fraudulent activity on her account and she needed to contact the company immediately. She was skeptical because she doesn’t have a Discover card. She called the number provided and spoke to someone who wanted her to provide her mother’entire Social Security number as verification. She gave her maiden name, but would only give the last four digits of her Social Security number.

The representative told the woman they couldn’t discuss the account unless she gave the entire number.

The woman hung up and looked up a direct phone number for Discover. When she called, the woman was able to verify her identity with the last four digits of her Social Security number and her mother’s maiden name. The birthday on file for the account was Sept. 7, 1972, which is close, but not the woman’s correct birthday.

The Discover representative told the woman that there was about $3,000 worth of charges to the account, including multiple $480 cash withdrawals at different ATMs. The representative couldn’t discuss the other charges with the woman. But she called back with a deputy in the room and got information about when the account was opened and used.

All the charges and cash withdrawals were made in the Atlanta area. On Aug. 17, someone attempted to buy $1,517.85 worth of groceries from an Atlanta Kroger, but the card was declined and the account flagged.

The woman froze the account.

 

Man scammed
on Craig’s List

A Columbia County man called authorities Thursday stating he’d been scammed trying to buy gift cards through online site www.craigslist.com.

The 38-year-old man said that he’d bought some gift cards that were later emptied before he could use them. He met another man who had advertised some gift cards for sale at the Steak and Shake on Aug. 12. After verifying the balances on a Dillard’s card and two Kohls cards totaling $1,100, the man paid the seller $400.

He’d previously messaged the seller that he did not want to get involved with anything illegal. The seller said they were gifts from family and he had another card with a receipt showing its balance at his home. The man agreed to buy the fourth card and went shopping at Kohls.

On Aug. 16, the seller said he found the other Kohls card and provided a receipt that showed it was loaded with $200. The man paid him $75. But when he got home, the man said he noticed that the gift card was purchased with a credit card. He got suspicious and checked the balances on all the cards, which all had zero balances.

The man called the seller, who rambled on about how he applied for the credit card using his father’s Social Security number and that he’d reimburse the man in a few days. When the man said he was calling authorities, the seller said he had no problem and could explain everything.

The man said he wasn’t concerned with getting his money back because he knew the risk of buying items off the site. But he didn’t want to be involved with someone using a stolen Social Security number.

 

Packages stolen
from neighbors

Two Grovetown neighbors told deputies Friday that packages were stolen from their porches.

A 31-year-old resident of High Meadows Drive said she ordered a pair of shoes from www.macys.com and the U.S. Postal Service informed her the shoes were delivered at 12:14 p.m. When she got home at 4 p.m., the package was missing.

The woman’s 51-year-old neighbor also told deputies packages were stolen from his porch. He said one was delivered by the Postal Service at 12:15 p.m. and another was delivered at 12:38 p.m. by UPS. But were stolen from his porch before he returned home at 3:15 p.m.

Categories: Local

Volunteers needed for Thurmond Lake cleanup

Volunteers are needed for the annual Thurmond Lake cleanup campaign.

The cleanup will run for one month starting Thursday, but it will conclude with a major, organized cleanup day on Sept. 26, which is also National Public Lands Day. The final cleanup will consist of a variety of projects including debris cleanup, brush clearing and trail and park cleanup around the shorelines, islands, recreation centers, coves, old road ends and bridge areas.

The Army Corps of Engineers is seeking Scouting groups, civic organization, sports clubs, church groups, businesses, families and individuals to help complete the projects.

To participate in the cleanup, submit a registration form online or call Corps Park Ranger Ron Woodall at (864) 333-1131 by Sept. 12. Completed forms can be dropped off or mailed to Thurmond Project Office at 510 Clarks Hill Highway, Clarks Hill, S.C. 29821. Forms can also be faxed to Woodall at (864) 333-1150 or e-mailed to CESAS-OP-T@usace.army.mil.

Volunteers interested in helping throughout the month can choose an area of shoreline to remove any glass, paper, plastic or abandoned items. Trash bags are available at the visitor center or volunteers can bring their own bags.

All volunteers are invited to a community cleanup and picnic on Sept. 26 from 8 a.m. to noon. Check-in is in the Lake Springs Recreation Area group shelter, 3900 Lake Springs Road in Appling. All volunteers should wear closed-toed shoes, long pants and bring plenty of water. Participants will receive T-shirts while supplies last and a one-day pass to any federal park.

The event will be canceled in the event of severe weather. For more information, call the Thurmond Project Office at (800) 533-3478, ext. 1131.

Categories: Local

Volunteers needed for Thurmond Lake cleanup

Volunteers are needed for the annual Thurmond Lake cleanup campaign.

The cleanup will run for one month starting Thursday, but it will conclude with a major, organized cleanup day on Sept. 26, which is also National Public Lands Day. The final cleanup will consist of a variety of projects including debris cleanup, brush clearing and trail and park cleanup around the shorelines, islands, recreation centers, coves, old road ends and bridge areas.

The Army Corps of Engineers is seeking Scouting groups, civic organization, sports clubs, church groups, businesses, families and individuals to help complete the projects.

To participate in the cleanup, submit a registration form online or call Corps Park Ranger Ron Woodall at (864) 333-1131 by Sept. 12. Completed forms can be dropped off or mailed to Thurmond Project Office at 510 Clarks Hill Highway, Clarks Hill, S.C. 29821. Forms can also be faxed to Woodall at (864) 333-1150 or e-mailed to CESAS-OP-T@usace.army.mil.

Volunteers interested in helping throughout the month can choose an area of shoreline to remove any glass, paper, plastic or abandoned items. Trash bags are available at the visitor center or volunteers can bring their own bags.

All volunteers are invited to a community cleanup and picnic on Sept. 26 from 8 a.m. to noon. Check-in is in the Lake Springs Recreation Area group shelter, 3900 Lake Springs Road in Appling. All volunteers should wear closed-toed shoes, long pants and bring plenty of water. Participants will receive T-shirts while supplies last and a one-day pass to any federal park.

The event will be canceled in the event of severe weather. For more information, call the Thurmond Project Office at (800) 533-3478, ext. 1131.

Categories: Local

Pet Adoptions

Categories: Local

Current Events

Basketball

2015 Skill Development Training Tuesdays and Thursdays through October, Sting Gym, 6000 Columbia Road, Grovetown; $25 per day or $35 per week; willaverybasketballcamps.com

Euchee Creek

School council meeting 2:30 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 26, Euchee Creek Elementary School, 795 Louisville Road, Grovetown; (706) 556-4000, edline.net/pages/Euchee_Creek_Elementary_School

Demolition bids

Residential Demolition Program: Project Release for Bids; specifications for released projects to be bid on will be onlined each date and copies available at Augusta-Richmond County Municipal Building Procurement Department, 535 Telfair St., Suite 605 – Aug. 27, Sept. 10, 24, Oct. 8, 22, Nov. 5, 19, Dec. 2, 16, 30; from www.augustaga.gov/679/Procurement choose the ARCBID application to view projects

Open house

Helms College open house 5-7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 27, Helms College, 2145 Washington Road; learn about the culinary programs, tour the campus; financial aid options for those who qualify, questions answered; light refreshments; helms.edu

Field trip

Augusta-Aiken Audubon Society field trip 8 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 29, Silver Bluff Audubon Sanctuary, 4542 Silver Bluff Road, Jackson; meet at Kathwood Ponds; walk around ponds looking for waders and shorebirds; beginners welcome; free; augustaaikenaudubon.org

Literary event

Toasting With the Authors 2015 noon-6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 29, White Columns Inn, 1890 Washington Road, Thomson; literary exposé showcasing up-and-coming, talented and creative authors; meet and greet with several authors, free; $15, receive an autographed book, a toast and have a photograph taken with an author; $25 also sit in VIP with the authors; asoral.org/#!toasting-with-the-authors/c23y1

Red Party

Stop Da Stigma Fighters Red Party 6-11 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 29, Henry H. Brigham Community Center, 2463 Golden Camp Road; bringing awareness of HIV and AIDS; entertainment, raffles, door prizes, open bar; benefits Fatty Marshall Foundation and Stop Da Stigma Fighters; donations welcome; $20 advance, $25 at door; (706) 421-4320, (706) 231-0876, stopdastigma@yahoo.com, tperry36@yahoo.com, facebook.com/events/474581436042341

Concert

Brian Free & Assurance 6 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 30, Grace Baptist Church, 4945 Hardy McManus Road, Evans; free, donations accepted; (706) 868-9729, GBCE.net

Kiwanis

Kiwanis Pre-organizational Meeting – Columbia County 5:15 p.m. Monday, Aug. 31, Columbia County Library, 7022 Evans Town Center Blvd., Evans; new club sponsored by Kiwanis Clubs of Uptown Augusta and Augusta; Q&A; Lt. Gov. for Georgia District of Kiwanis International Rick Berry, speaker; (803) 426-1333, kiwanis.org

Forestry pageant

Deadline to enter Miss Richmond County Forestry and Pine Seedling Scholarship Pageant Sept. 1; event to be held Oct. 10 in Evans; winners advance to Miss Georgia Forestry State Pageant; e-mail or call for application; localpageants@gmail.com, (706) 664-5010

Genealogy program

The General and His Lady 3-4 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 3, Augusta Museum of History, 560 Reynolds St.; Augusta Genealogical Society program covering the life of Maj. Gen. James Ewell Brown Stuart and his wife, Flora Cooke Stuart; Wayne Jones speaking about Jeb and Mrs. Stuart, their life together and the hardships they endured; (706) 722-4073, augustagensociety.org

Audubon meeting

Augusta-Aiken Audubon meeting 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 10, North Augusta Community Center, 495 Brookside Ave.; Matt Johnson of Francis Beidler Forest speaking on Prothonotary Warbler tracking; free; augustaaikenaudubon.org

Evans reunion

Evans High School 1985 class reunion Friday-Saturday, Sept. 11-12; contact Kelley Cross Sleeper (706) 860-6151, facebook.com/groups/EHS1985Reunion

Fundraising sale

Lynndale Advocates Indoor Yard Sale 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 12, Lynndale Advocates, 1490 Eisenhower Drive, refreshments and plants for sale; tax deductible donations accepted 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sept. 8-10

Cat show

Cattyshack Cats Champion and Household Pet Cat Show 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday-Sunday, Sept. 12-13, Riverview Park Activities Center, 100 Riverview Park Drive, North Auguta; learn about different breeds from Persian to Bengals; meet breeders, learn about cats; adoption agencies; cats from all over the United States competing for titles in seven judging rings; vendors; $5, seniors and ages 11 and younger $4, ages 2 and younger free; seregiontica.org

Doc Severinson

The Legendary Doc Severinson and his Big Band, doors 6:30 p.m., show 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 12, Jabez Sanford Hardin Performing Arts Center, 7022 Evans Town Center Blvd., Evans; $67; (706) 650-5005, augustaamusements.com

Crackerneck WMA

Augusta-Aiken Audubon Field Trip to Crackerneck Wildlife Management Area 8 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 12, meet at sign-in area off Brown Road, Jackson; woods, fields, ponds and streams; from Augusta take Old Jackson Highway past U.S. Post Office in Jackson, turn right onto Brown Road just after the ball field, take Brown Road to sign for Crackerneck WMA, turn left onto dirt road, drive to sign-in area; beginners welcome; Anne Waters and Lois Stacey lead; free; augustaaikenaudubon.org

Girls’ camp

Girls Got Game Fall League Sept. 12-Oct. 24, Sting Gym, 6000 Columbia Road, Grovetown; basketball league for girls only; divisions for grade 6, grades 7-8 and grades 9-12; playoffs Oct. 23-24; $200 per team or $75 individual; register online by Sept. 1; willaverybasketballcamps.com

Coffee roasting

The Art of Roasting: Why Better Beans Make Better Coffee 7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 14, Buona Caffe Artisan Roasted Coffee, 1858 Central Ave.; master roaster John Curry; American Culinary Federation Augusta Chapter, host; clothing drive to benefit Goodwill Industries; free; facebook.com/acfaugusta?ref=aymt_homepage_panel

Categories: Local

Current Events

Basketball

2015 Skill Development Training Tuesdays and Thursdays through October, Sting Gym, 6000 Columbia Road, Grovetown; $25 per day or $35 per week; willaverybasketballcamps.com

Euchee Creek

School council meeting 2:30 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 26, Euchee Creek Elementary School, 795 Louisville Road, Grovetown; (706) 556-4000, edline.net/pages/Euchee_Creek_Elementary_School

Demolition bids

Residential Demolition Program: Project Release for Bids; specifications for released projects to be bid on will be onlined each date and copies available at Augusta-Richmond County Municipal Building Procurement Department, 535 Telfair St., Suite 605 – Aug. 27, Sept. 10, 24, Oct. 8, 22, Nov. 5, 19, Dec. 2, 16, 30; from www.augustaga.gov/679/Procurement choose the ARCBID application to view projects

Open house

Helms College open house 5-7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 27, Helms College, 2145 Washington Road; learn about the culinary programs, tour the campus; financial aid options for those who qualify, questions answered; light refreshments; helms.edu

Field trip

Augusta-Aiken Audubon Society field trip 8 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 29, Silver Bluff Audubon Sanctuary, 4542 Silver Bluff Road, Jackson; meet at Kathwood Ponds; walk around ponds looking for waders and shorebirds; beginners welcome; free; augustaaikenaudubon.org

Literary event

Toasting With the Authors 2015 noon-6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 29, White Columns Inn, 1890 Washington Road, Thomson; literary exposé showcasing up-and-coming, talented and creative authors; meet and greet with several authors, free; $15, receive an autographed book, a toast and have a photograph taken with an author; $25 also sit in VIP with the authors; asoral.org/#!toasting-with-the-authors/c23y1

Red Party

Stop Da Stigma Fighters Red Party 6-11 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 29, Henry H. Brigham Community Center, 2463 Golden Camp Road; bringing awareness of HIV and AIDS; entertainment, raffles, door prizes, open bar; benefits Fatty Marshall Foundation and Stop Da Stigma Fighters; donations welcome; $20 advance, $25 at door; (706) 421-4320, (706) 231-0876, stopdastigma@yahoo.com, tperry36@yahoo.com, facebook.com/events/474581436042341

Concert

Brian Free & Assurance 6 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 30, Grace Baptist Church, 4945 Hardy McManus Road, Evans; free, donations accepted; (706) 868-9729, GBCE.net

Kiwanis

Kiwanis Pre-organizational Meeting – Columbia County 5:15 p.m. Monday, Aug. 31, Columbia County Library, 7022 Evans Town Center Blvd., Evans; new club sponsored by Kiwanis Clubs of Uptown Augusta and Augusta; Q&A; Lt. Gov. for Georgia District of Kiwanis International Rick Berry, speaker; (803) 426-1333, kiwanis.org

Forestry pageant

Deadline to enter Miss Richmond County Forestry and Pine Seedling Scholarship Pageant Sept. 1; event to be held Oct. 10 in Evans; winners advance to Miss Georgia Forestry State Pageant; e-mail or call for application; localpageants@gmail.com, (706) 664-5010

Genealogy program

The General and His Lady 3-4 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 3, Augusta Museum of History, 560 Reynolds St.; Augusta Genealogical Society program covering the life of Maj. Gen. James Ewell Brown Stuart and his wife, Flora Cooke Stuart; Wayne Jones speaking about Jeb and Mrs. Stuart, their life together and the hardships they endured; (706) 722-4073, augustagensociety.org

Audubon meeting

Augusta-Aiken Audubon meeting 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 10, North Augusta Community Center, 495 Brookside Ave.; Matt Johnson of Francis Beidler Forest speaking on Prothonotary Warbler tracking; free; augustaaikenaudubon.org

Evans reunion

Evans High School 1985 class reunion Friday-Saturday, Sept. 11-12; contact Kelley Cross Sleeper (706) 860-6151, facebook.com/groups/EHS1985Reunion

Fundraising sale

Lynndale Advocates Indoor Yard Sale 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 12, Lynndale Advocates, 1490 Eisenhower Drive, refreshments and plants for sale; tax deductible donations accepted 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sept. 8-10

Cat show

Cattyshack Cats Champion and Household Pet Cat Show 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday-Sunday, Sept. 12-13, Riverview Park Activities Center, 100 Riverview Park Drive, North Auguta; learn about different breeds from Persian to Bengals; meet breeders, learn about cats; adoption agencies; cats from all over the United States competing for titles in seven judging rings; vendors; $5, seniors and ages 11 and younger $4, ages 2 and younger free; seregiontica.org

Doc Severinson

The Legendary Doc Severinson and his Big Band, doors 6:30 p.m., show 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 12, Jabez Sanford Hardin Performing Arts Center, 7022 Evans Town Center Blvd., Evans; $67; (706) 650-5005, augustaamusements.com

Crackerneck WMA

Augusta-Aiken Audubon Field Trip to Crackerneck Wildlife Management Area 8 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 12, meet at sign-in area off Brown Road, Jackson; woods, fields, ponds and streams; from Augusta take Old Jackson Highway past U.S. Post Office in Jackson, turn right onto Brown Road just after the ball field, take Brown Road to sign for Crackerneck WMA, turn left onto dirt road, drive to sign-in area; beginners welcome; Anne Waters and Lois Stacey lead; free; augustaaikenaudubon.org

Girls’ camp

Girls Got Game Fall League Sept. 12-Oct. 24, Sting Gym, 6000 Columbia Road, Grovetown; basketball league for girls only; divisions for grade 6, grades 7-8 and grades 9-12; playoffs Oct. 23-24; $200 per team or $75 individual; register online by Sept. 1; willaverybasketballcamps.com

Coffee roasting

The Art of Roasting: Why Better Beans Make Better Coffee 7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 14, Buona Caffe Artisan Roasted Coffee, 1858 Central Ave.; master roaster John Curry; American Culinary Federation Augusta Chapter, host; clothing drive to benefit Goodwill Industries; free; facebook.com/acfaugusta?ref=aymt_homepage_panel

Categories: Local

Backhoe pushed car through intersection, woman says

An Evans man is facing charges after he pushed a woman’s vehicle through an intersection after she failed to move soon enough for the green light.

The 44-year-old woman called 911 about 10:45 a.m. Saturday to report a case of road rage.

According to a Richmond County sheriff’s incident report, a man in a backhoe behind her vehicle at the intersection of Wheeler Road and Augusta West Parkway used the backhoe to push her Subaru Forester through the intersection.

She followed the backhoe driver to a construction site at Augusta West Parkway and Amli Way, where he hopped out of the backhoe and into a pickup, fleeing the area.

After deputies tracked down the vehicle, the woman identified the pickup passenger, 46-year-old Robert Stanley, as the driver of the backhoe.

Stanley admitted to police that he had pushed the Subaru because he was frustrated that she didn’t go for the green light.

Stanley was charged with reckless conduct for the road rage incident.

He had active warrants in Richmond County for obstruction and three traffic citations.

A hold was placed on Stanley for the Columbia County Sheriff’s Office.

Categories: Local

Backhoe pushed car through intersection, woman says

An Evans man is facing charges after he pushed a woman’s vehicle through an intersection after she failed to move soon enough for the green light.

The 44-year-old woman called 911 about 10:45 a.m. Saturday to report a case of road rage.

According to a Richmond County sheriff’s incident report, a man in a backhoe behind her vehicle at the intersection of Wheeler Road and Augusta West Parkway used the backhoe to push her Subaru Forester through the intersection.

She followed the backhoe driver to a construction site at Augusta West Parkway and Amli Way, where he hopped out of the backhoe and into a pickup, fleeing the area.

After deputies tracked down the vehicle, the woman identified the pickup passenger, 46-year-old Robert Stanley, as the driver of the backhoe.

Stanley admitted to police that he had pushed the Subaru because he was frustrated that she didn’t go for the green light.

Stanley was charged with reckless conduct for the road rage incident.

He had active warrants in Richmond County for obstruction and three traffic citations.

A hold was placed on Stanley for the Columbia County Sheriff’s Office.

Categories: Local

Athlete Spotlight for Wednesday, August 26, 2025 - Lakeside High School's Alyssa Hooker

 

Disappointment during the 2014 track season may be bad news for cross country rivals of Lakeside High School’s Alyssa Hooker.

After winning the 2014 Class AAAAA state cross country championship, Hooker was running well late in the track season, winning the 3,200 meters and taking third in the 1,600 at the Region 2-AAAAA meet. An injury would curtail her from moving on.

“She was disappointed with how track ended,” said Lakeside coach Jerry Meitin. “She was injured and had to miss the state track meet.

‘‘I think that has motivated her to work hard. She’s been healthy and running strong.”

Fueled by how the track season ended, Hooker was motivated prior to the school year and believes her training is twice as good as it was a year ago at this same time.

“I ran every day during the summer, not necessarily a lot, but I was running with the boy’s team, which is a huge step,” said Hooker. “Running 4 miles (at) my pace versus 4 miles (at a) boy’s pace feels like 1,000 miles.”

That training should help with the way she likes to appproach her races.

“I’ve always had the strategy of going out slow and getting faster, so this year, since I’m training harder, I can start out fast and get faster,” Hooker said.

Her continued regimen is helping the team run to its potential.

“She’s taken to running with the lead guys and all but pushing a couple of them,” Meitin said. “They, of course, don’t like being beaten by a girl. There’s pressure on some of those guys to stay ahead of her.”

Even at an early age, Hooker liked to mentor runners younger than herself and she has continued to do that at Lakeside.

“I call them peeps, I don’t know why,” Hooker said. “I take little young ones under my wings, basically. I’ve done this for years. As an eighth-grader I took in sixth-graders on the track team and now as a junior I’m taking in freshmen, because I get along with younger people.”

Race day doesn’t begin and end for Hooker with her own meet; she stays active encouraging the runners on the Lakeside squads.

“I cheer on everyone because I like to see everybody win and I don’t really like attention,” Hooker said. “Everybody’s doing their best and my best may be first and their best may be third or slower, like place-wise, but I still think the best is the best, so their best is what they’re giving, and that’s amazing to me.”

With the success she’s had, Hooker knows there’s a target on her back. And even after winning a state title, she doesn’t necessarily feel like the frontrunner.

“I have heard people talk about me,” Hooker said. “They sound so scared talking about me. I guess it’s a good feeling inside that people are nervous to run against me, but at the same time I am just as nervous to run against you, I can guarantee you that. I don’t ever go into a meet thinking I can win.”

Categories: Local

Athlete Spotlight for Wednesday, August 26, 2025 - Lakeside High School's Alyssa Hooker

 

Disappointment during the 2014 track season may be bad news for cross country rivals of Lakeside High School’s Alyssa Hooker.

After winning the 2014 Class AAAAA state cross country championship, Hooker was running well late in the track season, winning the 3,200 meters and taking third in the 1,600 at the Region 2-AAAAA meet. An injury would curtail her from moving on.

“She was disappointed with how track ended,” said Lakeside coach Jerry Meitin. “She was injured and had to miss the state track meet.

‘‘I think that has motivated her to work hard. She’s been healthy and running strong.”

Fueled by how the track season ended, Hooker was motivated prior to the school year and believes her training is twice as good as it was a year ago at this same time.

“I ran every day during the summer, not necessarily a lot, but I was running with the boy’s team, which is a huge step,” said Hooker. “Running 4 miles (at) my pace versus 4 miles (at a) boy’s pace feels like 1,000 miles.”

That training should help with the way she likes to appproach her races.

“I’ve always had the strategy of going out slow and getting faster, so this year, since I’m training harder, I can start out fast and get faster,” Hooker said.

Her continued regimen is helping the team run to its potential.

“She’s taken to running with the lead guys and all but pushing a couple of them,” Meitin said. “They, of course, don’t like being beaten by a girl. There’s pressure on some of those guys to stay ahead of her.”

Even at an early age, Hooker liked to mentor runners younger than herself and she has continued to do that at Lakeside.

“I call them peeps, I don’t know why,” Hooker said. “I take little young ones under my wings, basically. I’ve done this for years. As an eighth-grader I took in sixth-graders on the track team and now as a junior I’m taking in freshmen, because I get along with younger people.”

Race day doesn’t begin and end for Hooker with her own meet; she stays active encouraging the runners on the Lakeside squads.

“I cheer on everyone because I like to see everybody win and I don’t really like attention,” Hooker said. “Everybody’s doing their best and my best may be first and their best may be third or slower, like place-wise, but I still think the best is the best, so their best is what they’re giving, and that’s amazing to me.”

With the success she’s had, Hooker knows there’s a target on her back. And even after winning a state title, she doesn’t necessarily feel like the frontrunner.

“I have heard people talk about me,” Hooker said. “They sound so scared talking about me. I guess it’s a good feeling inside that people are nervous to run against me, but at the same time I am just as nervous to run against you, I can guarantee you that. I don’t ever go into a meet thinking I can win.”

Categories: Local

Mega Millions - 08/25/2015

Georgia Lottery - Wed, 8/26/2015 12:00 AM
05-44-54-59-63 Mega Ball: 01 Megaplier: 5X Estimated Jackpot: $64 Million
Categories: Local

Fantasy 5 - 08/25/2015

Georgia Lottery - Wed, 8/26/2015 12:00 AM
02-03-09-11-37 Estimated Jackpot: $203,000
Categories: Local

Jumbo Bucks Lotto - 08/24/2015

Georgia Lottery - Tue, 8/25/2015 12:00 AM
02-13-19-30-33-45 Estimated Jackpot: $1,200,000
Categories: Local

Fantasy 5 - 08/24/2015

Georgia Lottery - Tue, 8/25/2015 12:00 AM
07-21-26-27-32 Estimated Jackpot: $125,000
Categories: Local

Looking back 4 months at a Q&A with Davis Love III

ScottMichaux.com - Mon, 8/24/2015 5:37 PM
By Scott Michaux

Near the end of May, I spent 35 minutes talking on the phone with Davis Love III. He was en route to his rehab session for recent foot surgery -- the kind of thing that keeps coming up for those of us who've crossed the threshold into senior tour eligibility. A couple months earlier, Love had been named for the second time as captain of the U.S. Ryder team for the matches at Hazeltine next year. Love was gracious and happy to talk about anything, particularly still feeling competitive on the PGA Tour.

 

On Sunday -- at the ripe age of 51 years, 4 months and 10 days -- Love became the third oldest player in history to win on the PGA Tour. He did it at Sedgefield Country Club in Greensboro, the same course and tournament where Sam Snead became the oldest winner in PGA Tour history in 1960 when he won at 52 years, 10 months and 8 days old. Fittingly, Love's name goes for a third time on the Sam Snead Cup presented to the winner of the tournament formerly known (and still affecionately referred to by many) as the GGO. To beat Snead's record, Love will have to win it again in 2017.

 

A few things to note before posting the full text of the Q&A -- part of which ran in the June/July edition of Virginia Golfer Magazine. Despite his advancing age, Love currently ranks 12th on the PGA Tour in total driving, which is pretty good for a guy who’s required neck and foot surgeries on his aging body. Next season will be his 30th as a full-time member on the regular tour, with 21 victories (including the 1997 PGA Championship and two Players Championships) and 30 runner-up finishes to show for it. Though his previous win came in 2008, Love still believed that he was capable of getting another one before eventually “retiring” to play full time amongst his peers on the Champions Tour. More importantly to Love, however, is that he will cap that 30th season by captaining the U.S. Ryder Cup team in 2016 as the chosen leader by the PGA of America’s Task Force determined to turn around America’s flailing fortunes in the biennial matches against Europe.

 

In this May Q&A, Love spoke about that second chance as captain, playing with the new generation of stars and the highs and lows of his legacy in the game:

 

SCOTT MICHAUX: How’s your health and recovery from foot surgery going?

DAVIS LOVE III: I’m heading to rehab right now. Not drinking rehab, but if I keep getting surgeries I’m going to probably start drinking. I’m encouraged most days with how much progress I’m making. Basically I’d worn out some joints underneath my second and third toe and one of them was dislocated. The other one was losing traction. I had all kinds of bad stuff going on so I finally had to just suck it up and have it fixed. I don’t know how fast I’m going to be back to walking five miles a day. My first week back might actually be (Champions Tour event June 5-7) in Des Moines. Just in case, if I go ahead and start playing and the first day I walk and the second day it’s bothering me I can hop in a cart. But realistically if I can make it back and play a little bit before U.S. Open qualifying I think I’ll be lucky.

 

SM: You’re obviously still intent on competing on the PGA Tour. What is your motivation?

DL3: If I wasn’t hitting the ball well or if I was losing distance or felt like I couldn’t compete ball-striking wise, I’d probably already be out playing Champions Tour. But the few (events) that I’ve played I’ve realized that if I putt well enough to win on the Champions Tour, I can win on the regular tour. It’s just the short game is not doing its part. That’s obviously a lot mental. Hopefully with six weeks of short-game practice coming up I can get that a little bit better and be able to compete. Sure Dustin Johnson and Gary Woodland are out-driving me, but they out-drive everybody. Fourth in total driving is probably the best I’ve been in awhile.

I’ll give the summer and FedEx Cup season a run. If I don’t make it very far in the FedEx there are some good Champions Tour events at the end of their season I can play. And then turn around and go right back to the regular tour’s kickoff season through McGladrey (hosted by the Davis Love Foundation) and reassess during next year. Trust me, I am not going to be a guy that’s out there taking up a spot playing just to play. The last year I was kidding myself with my foot that it’s going to be okay and it kept getting worse and worse. If I can walk and practice my short game some, I think I can compete out there. But I am definitely not going to be making a farewell tour or just hang out. ... When I say I have no chance, then I’ll completely make a switch over.

 

SM: Is part of your remaining a PGA Tour regular to be able to assess first-hand your potential Ryder Cup players?

DL3: That’s a big part of what I was trying to do this year for Jay Haas, being an assistant for him (in the Presidents Cup). It really helped me help Freddie Couples at Muirfield (Village) because I was out there playing and hanging out with Jordan Spieth when he played Presidents Cup for the first time. As a rookie on tour playing Presidents Cup, it was good that I could spend some time with him. I can keep an eye on guys and play with guys and talk to guys out there. Jay and Fred are almost 100 percent Champions Tour and they’re not seeing these guys. A new guy who pops up playing well all of the sudden that they don’t know, I’m out there live watching them actually play and it helps.

 

SM: Is that part of the reason that you were selected by your fellow members of the Ryder Cup Task Forece to serve as captain again in 2016 at Hazeltine?

DL3: A little bit of the thinking was that I’m still connected. I’m involved in everything going on on the tour – on the Policy Board, (chairman) of the Player Advisory Council. I think that really helps. They know Tiger, Phil, Furyk and know that I know those guys and they know me and are comfortable with me. And also after Medinah and being assistant on Presidents Cup, you don’t get a bunch of American players going, ‘Where did that come from?’ They’re more like, ‘It makes sense. He’s kind of like all-time captain right now. We see him at every event all the way back to Wales with Corey Pavin.’ That really ultimately is what we feel like we have been missing and what we need going forward. We need Tiger, Phil, (Tom) Lehman and all those guys in it every year and not just helping me at Hazeltine. We need a plan that includes guys who could be captain, guys who used to be captain. My ultimate goal going into the Task Force was to have somebody let me come to the next two or three Ryder Cups and just help out. Not be assistant even. Just come help out – drive a cart, give input, handle the wet rain suits. Just somebody behind the scenes. It went from me offering whatever I could do to help all the way to me being captain. It was the same thing Tiger said and Furyk and Phil and Steve Stricker. We told the PGA, we will do whatever it takes to win. They opened a door and we just charged through it. You just tell us what we can do. They said you guys can do pretty much whatever you want if you think it’s going to work.

As a group from Raymond Floyd to Rickie Fowler, we came up with this is what we all think will work if we just do it year after year after year after year. Phil likes to come up with odds and he said, ‘Look, we’re not going to win 10 in a row. I guarantee that. But lets do this and run a system and get everybody engaged and try to win seven out of 10.’ If we do the same things over and over, we can have some success. If we keep changing every two years and doing something different, we’re just spinning our wheels. This is what we wanted to do and it’s probably unfair to bring somebody from outside of this group and tell them you’re the captain and you’re going to have to do it our way.

 

SM: What will be different than the last time you captained in 2012 at Medinah?

DL3: I didn’t reach out enough to former captains. Here’s a perfect example of why the Task Force is gonna work. Not saying we’re going to automatically win but why this is gonna work for the teams going forward. I called all the former captains who I played for. When I called Lanny Wadkins before the press conference, he said, ‘You have made my day. I’m am so excited that somebody called me and told me what’s going on and asked for my opinion and wanted my help.’ I didn’t ask him last time. When I keep saying I made mistakes when I was captain before, I didn’t sit down with Tom Kite and Lanny Wadkins and Ben Crenshaw and Raymond Floyd and say, ‘Tell me what to do.’ That culture was not there for us to have communication and support and ideas and a game-plan that got handed off. We didn’t have that continuity, that system. Now we’re all excited because this is what we’re going to do this year and this is what we’re going to do two years from now and this is what we’re going to four years from now. We have a plan and system and we’re all bought into it. The challenge is to make sure these guys who are going to make the team know we’re organized and ready and that guys like Tiger and Phil and Stricker are not only trying to make the team, they’re trying to help Davis and they’re watching and planning and strategizing. I think that’s what Europe’s done really well. They’ve got a committee and they know who’s going to be the next captain and the captain after that and who’s going to be the assistants. They’re doing all this stuff and it’s more than just a new captain every two years picking four of his friends. It’s continuity, continuity, continuity. Nick Saban or Dean Smith or whoever is a great coach, they run the same system over and over and over and practice and practice the system. We’ve never really had a long-term game-plan to get our guys prepared year after year.

 

SM: Are you excited to get a second chance to be a winning captain?

DL3: Every time I talk about it I get excited, because it’s so different and so fresh. That’s why it’s not a second chance for me. It’s starting over. It’s like this is a whole new deal. This is the second time I’m doing it but I’m not the same captain. I’m starting over with a better team behind me and a fresher outlook. Now I know I can be more focused and decisive on what matters for the players. And I can handle the details. (My wife) Robin and I are already working on it and it’s easier because we’ve both already done it. Now the golf stuff, because of this Task Force, we’re more focused early on what we have to do to get the team ready. I was given the schedule before. Now I’m building the schedule for the week. That’s different. So I’m not looking at it that Davis lost and gets to do this again. We’re setting a course for the future and I got to be the guy who gets to kick it off.

 

SM: Does that fact that you went through this Task Force add to the pressure to win in 2016?

DL3: The main reason this Task Force happened is because we were losing. We keep losing. I’ve been on those stages 15 times and I look across at the other team and think we’ve got a really good team, we can win this. Then it’s always close or we lose. So why in the Presidents Cup do we play so well and the Ryder Cup we don’t play as well? It’s a matter of we want to win the Ryder Cup so badly that we get in our own way. The secret is how do we get them to relax and play like they do at the Presidents Cup. That’s confidence and preparation somehow and we’ve got to get over that hump. This is going to be even more pressure because we’ve lost three in a row. We don’t want to add pressure because Davis is captain again and we want to win for Davis. I blew Valderrama for Tom Kite. Justin Leonard, Tiger Woods and Davis Love didn’t win any points. We won majors that year and we wanted so badly to be leaders of that team and we blew it because we tried too hard. I was playing great when I got there and we got nervous and got behind and we panicked. How do I get these guys to say this is a fresh start, forget the record of the past?

(Sports psychologist) Bob Rotella has signed up to help me not just a little bit but like he does Kentucky basketball – all year, every turn. These guys want to win. But they don’t want to lose again and that’s going to be the secret. What’s the message to the team to keep telling them to relax and play and have fun? When I’m at the Presidents Cup we’re going to be trying to help Jay win, but we’re going to be watching what’s going on here that we can translate to a Ryder Cup. That’s going to be really important to not let these guys focus on the record of the past. They’re going to hear it. They’re going to be like Kentucky basketball all year long. You’re undefeated, undefeated, undefeated. We’re going to hear you’ve lost, you’ve lost, you’ve lost, task force, task force, yada yada. They’re going to hear it. There’s no avoiding that. We’re going to have to manage that.

 

SM: Your record compares favorably to peers Freddie Couples and Mark O’Meara who were elected to the World Golf Hall of Fame. Have you thought about the possibility of getting inducted?

DL3: Honestly I don’t. I didn’t start out on the tour wanting to make the Hall of Fame. I wanted to see how good I could get and wanted to win a bunch of tournaments and last for awhile. I’m honored by Payne Stewart Awards and Ben Hogan Awards from the USGA and things like that. I don’t like making speeches and don’t like the attention. I want to be the Ryder Cup captain because I want to be around the team. Do I like the attention of being Ryder Cup captain? No thank you. I don’t want it to be about me. If people keep thinking I deserve to be in the Hall of Fame and I don’t have to go and give a speech, then I’m pretty happy. There’s a lot of sense in what they’re doing now in slowing down and not having to put somebody in every year. They should put people in who are slam dunks. When I think Hall of Fame I think Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer, Tom Watson. I don’t think Davis Love. So that’s where I am on it. It’s not something I’m hung up on. I’m glad they threw my name out, but I couldn’t have been more proud than when they gave me the Payne Stewart Award because that has nothing to do with my playing record. The same thing about the Ryder Cup captaincy. It has a little to do with your playing record but it also means you have a lot more respect in the game. That means more to me than a discussion about the Hall of Fame.

 

SM: You had one career victory when your father (PGA professional Davis Love Jr.) died in a plane crash in 1988. Do you wonder how your career might be different with him still around?

DL3: I think about it all the time. Everybody from Peter Kostis to Butch Harmon to Jack Lumpkin and my brother have all helped fill the gap and keep me going. But watching my son play very well some weeks and very poorly others, that’s when I miss him and I wonder could my dad have made a difference for me and could he be making a difference for Dru Love. Dru’s got great instruction, but it’s different if it was your grandpa. I had great instruction, but it was different when one of the top 10 teachers in the country was down the hall. Would it have made a difference? To give him credit I would say yes. I put in a lot of hard work with a lot of other guys. Any in business and family life, when you lose somebody it changes things. I miss him bad for Dru Love right now and my brother, Mark, who does a lot of teaching. It would have been a lot of fun and a lot different. I’d love to see my dad watching my son hit golf balls. That would be incredible. But Mark watches him and I get the same feeling it’s getting passed on. I don’t feel sorry for myself that I missed out. My mom missed out more than anybody. Jack Lumpkin cannot give me a lesson without telling me a story about my dad. ‘Remember when he told you to keep your right foot on the ground? Well keep your right foot on the ground.’ It’s still the same stuff that goes back to Harvey Penick. Now Jack tells me the things Harvey Penick told my dad. It’s nice to have that connection,

 

SM: Some say you were too nice to be a great champion. Do you think that’s fair?

DL3: Nick Price is a pretty good guy and he played well. There’s a lot of things I’m sure I could have done differently. I could have spent less time with my family and could have worked harder and won more tournaments. But I’m very happy with my off-the-course life and I wouldn’t change that at all. Certainly I could have been tougher mentally. I don’t know if that means meaner. But I’m certain I lost – I don’t know how many second places I had, maybe 30 of them – but I wasn’t as strong mentally as Tiger Woods, I can guarantee you that. Whether that’s mean or tough or focused or whatever, yeah I could have been better for sure.

 

SM: Of all your runner-ups, were the two at Augusta the toughest to swallow?

DL3: The Ben Crenshaw piece was on the Golf Channel in our paddleboard shop the other day and I said, ‘Y’all need to change that channel because this doesn’t turnout good for me.’ The 1995 (Masters) stings and I love it at the same time. Because I love that Ben Crenshaw won. He’s one of my all-time heroes and good friends and the Harvey Penick story and all that. But it still is tough and still stings a little bit. I shot a score, like Phil just did, that would have won a whole lot of Masters and I didn’t win. That was kind of disappointing. But I’m still happy for Ben. You can’t get mad at Ben Crenshaw. The (1996) U.S. Open was tough when Steve Jones won ... to kind of blow that one at the end. Like anybody who’s been out there a long time, you get away with a few and win them and you’re also going to blow some and that’s part of it.

 

SM: The answer might be the PGA at Winged Foot, but what stands out as your most satisfying moment in golf?

DL3: My proudest moment and memories that I don’t want anyone to take away from me was Medinah. That’s why I’m excited to do it again. That was more fun, and people seem to be disappointed for me that we didn’t win. I’m disappointed for those 12 guys that they didn’t win. But I had a great time. I don’t have any regrets. Watching those guys tee off in front of that big crowd on the first tee on Friday and Saturday and even Sunday morning, that was the most thrilling week of my life. Mike Hulbert (assistant captain) will tell you the same thing. It’s an experience I don’t want to give up. So even though winning a bunch of golf tournaments for me was great, getting to experience that as the captain rather than the player who is nervous and doing his thing, being able to soak it all in in front of the home-team crowd was exciting. That was a week that I’ll never forget and will always treasure.

 

Categories: Local

Fantasy 5 - 08/23/2015

Georgia Lottery - Mon, 8/24/2015 12:00 AM
09-13-15-17-30 Estimated Jackpot: $100,000
Categories: Local
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