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County History

Nancy Blanchard and William Paschal, members of the Columbia County Historical Society, are making sure the history of the old Leah High School is not forgotten. They have contributed items to the Leah Museum, which is attached to fire station No. 16 on Ray Owens Road.

The museum opened in 2010 after an effort to restore the arch, which led to the school, was completed.

Both Blanchard and Paschal have fond memories of the time they spent at the school, which graduated its last senior class in 1949. The school’s lower school classes closed in 1956.

“Geography was my favorite subject,” said Blanchard. “I also remember playing baseball at recess.”

Paschal, who attended the high school for two years and played on the basketball team, clearly remembers his time there.

“I drove the school bus one year,” said Paschal. “I was just a kid. I also loved to work in the carpenter shop.”

Other memories Paschal has about school don’t have anything to do with education.

“I remember Mrs. Manny Ware (a teacher),” recalls Paschal. “She drove a ’36 Chevy. We picked up the back of her car and put a melon rind under the rear wheels. Then we’d stand back and watch her spin.”

Blanchard also remembers the teachers.

“Mrs. Reese was one of my teachers,” recalls Blanchard. “And Mrs. Goolsby and Mrs. Ward.”

Elizabeth Hardin Reese, 108, still lives nearby.

One of the items in the museum is an old school bell that is believed to be the one that teacher Jessie Ramsey rang to call the children in from recess.

“It was found under a house that Mrs. Ramsey once lived in,” said Blanchard.

A visit to the Leah Museum, which is open by appointment only, can be arranged by calling Nancy Blanchard at (706)
541-0043.

Categories: Local

Event to showcase foods facing extinction

An international organization with a new local chapter will hold its first event in the area this week at the Evans Towne Center Farmers Market. Dubbed “Ark in the Park,” the event will showcase distinctive foods.

According to its Web site, Slow Food is a “global, grassroots organization with supporters in 150 countries around the world who are linking the pleasure of good food with a commitment to their community and the environment.”

Slow Food was founded to counter the “rise of fast food and fast life, the disappearance of local food traditions and people’s dwindling interest in the food they eat, where it comes from, how it tastes and how our food choices affect the rest of the world.”

The Ark in the Park event will be Thursday from 4:30-7 p.m. It is the organization’s “living catalog of delicious and distinctive foods facing extinction,” according to Dr. Stephen Fountain of Slow Food Central Savannah River (CSR).

Dr. Fountain said animals like those that were on the ark will be at the event. Local chefs will be preparing and distributing samples of dishes made with ark ingredients.

“Kids will also be able to plant ark seeds and take them home with them,” he said, adding that food samples and seeds will be available.

Those interested in becoming members of the local Slow Food chapter will learn more about the organization and can join Slow Food CSR at the market.

“Many foods on the ark, both plants and animals, are produced right here in our area, and attendees will get to see some of them, and more importantly, to taste some of the wonderful dishes made with these amazing ingredients.”

“You can see the whole USA Ark of Taste catalog at www.slowfoodusa.org/ark-of-taste,” said Dr. Fountain. “It’s very cool.”

The Evans Towne Farmers Market is open Thursdays from 4:30-7 p.m. at the Evans Library park through Oct. 30.

Categories: Local

Event to showcase foods facing extinction

An international organization with a new local chapter will hold its first event in the area this week at the Evans Towne Center Farmers Market. Dubbed “Ark in the Park,” the event will showcase distinctive foods.

According to its Web site, Slow Food is a “global, grassroots organization with supporters in 150 countries around the world who are linking the pleasure of good food with a commitment to their community and the environment.”

Slow Food was founded to counter the “rise of fast food and fast life, the disappearance of local food traditions and people’s dwindling interest in the food they eat, where it comes from, how it tastes and how our food choices affect the rest of the world.”

The Ark in the Park event will be Thursday from 4:30-7 p.m. It is the organization’s “living catalog of delicious and distinctive foods facing extinction,” according to Dr. Stephen Fountain of Slow Food Central Savannah River (CSR).

Dr. Fountain said animals like those that were on the ark will be at the event. Local chefs will be preparing and distributing samples of dishes made with ark ingredients.

“Kids will also be able to plant ark seeds and take them home with them,” he said, adding that food samples and seeds will be available.

Those interested in becoming members of the local Slow Food chapter will learn more about the organization and can join Slow Food CSR at the market.

“Many foods on the ark, both plants and animals, are produced right here in our area, and attendees will get to see some of them, and more importantly, to taste some of the wonderful dishes made with these amazing ingredients.”

“You can see the whole USA Ark of Taste catalog at www.slowfoodusa.org/ark-of-taste,” said Dr. Fountain. “It’s very cool.”

The Evans Towne Farmers Market is open Thursdays from 4:30-7 p.m. at the Evans Library park through Oct. 30.

Categories: Local

Officials will consider Rhodes building renovations

A staff recommendation for the renovation of one of the former Rhodes-Murphy buildings will go before Columbia County officials at Tuesday’s semimonthly board of commissioners’ meeting.

The county purchased the three buildings on the Ronald Reagan Drive site in October for $3 million.

Since then, a rainstorm has caused significant damage to the third building, the one farthest from Ronald Reagan Drive.

“The damage was pretty extensive,” Deputy County Administrator Glenn Kennedy said at a recent Development and Engineering Services Committee meeting.

Rainwater collected in the gutters of the building backed up and ran down an interior wall of the building damaging walls and carpet. Upon further inspection, Facilities Services Special Projects Manager John Paul Stout said the roof of the building needs to be repaired as well.

He suggested that the state contractor, Centennial Contractor Enterprises Inc., move in to make the $119,000 worth of repairs. Centennial is already working on $251,000 worth of similar repairs on the front building, where the state Department of Revenue is expected to move into before the end of the year.

Commission Chairman Ron Cross said the county is obligated up to $25,000 of the cost of the front building’s renovation, per the lease agreement with the revenue department.

Stout said the $119,000 price tag is for a “pretty comprehensive overhauling” of the third rain-damaged building. “This is a building we would have the option of leasing out. ... So speed is of the essence.”

The needed repairs include removing wallpaper, repairing sheetrock walls and removing and replacing carpet. Stout also recommended minor roof repairs including adding a water-proof membrane in the gutters, repairing some soft spots on the roof and replacing some flashing to ensure water can’t get inside again.

“I’ve got some reservations about this,” Cross said at the meeting.

Cross said he’d prefer to see the project go out for bid to get the best price and possibly reduce the scope of the renovations.

“There’s still a lot of work to be done on that,” Cross said.

Categories: Local

Officials will consider Rhodes building renovations

A staff recommendation for the renovation of one of the former Rhodes-Murphy buildings will go before Columbia County officials at Tuesday’s semimonthly board of commissioners’ meeting.

The county purchased the three buildings on the Ronald Reagan Drive site in October for $3 million.

Since then, a rainstorm has caused significant damage to the third building, the one farthest from Ronald Reagan Drive.

“The damage was pretty extensive,” Deputy County Administrator Glenn Kennedy said at a recent Development and Engineering Services Committee meeting.

Rainwater collected in the gutters of the building backed up and ran down an interior wall of the building damaging walls and carpet. Upon further inspection, Facilities Services Special Projects Manager John Paul Stout said the roof of the building needs to be repaired as well.

He suggested that the state contractor, Centennial Contractor Enterprises Inc., move in to make the $119,000 worth of repairs. Centennial is already working on $251,000 worth of similar repairs on the front building, where the state Department of Revenue is expected to move into before the end of the year.

Commission Chairman Ron Cross said the county is obligated up to $25,000 of the cost of the front building’s renovation, per the lease agreement with the revenue department.

Stout said the $119,000 price tag is for a “pretty comprehensive overhauling” of the third rain-damaged building. “This is a building we would have the option of leasing out. ... So speed is of the essence.”

The needed repairs include removing wallpaper, repairing sheetrock walls and removing and replacing carpet. Stout also recommended minor roof repairs including adding a water-proof membrane in the gutters, repairing some soft spots on the roof and replacing some flashing to ensure water can’t get inside again.

“I’ve got some reservations about this,” Cross said at the meeting.

Cross said he’d prefer to see the project go out for bid to get the best price and possibly reduce the scope of the renovations.

“There’s still a lot of work to be done on that,” Cross said.

Categories: Local

Sheriff's office gets life-saving, crime-fighting donations

The Columbia County Sheriff’s Office recently received a few new gadgets for its tool box.

Michael Cardenaz, president and co-founder of the J.D. Paugh Memorial Foundation, donated some tools to the sheriff’s office Monday, including a Recon Robitics Throwbot XT and 50 Combat Action Tourniquets.

The throwbot, worth $4,800, is an armored, hand-held robot that can be thrown into a variety of critical incident scenes. It can be remotely controlled from a safe distance and provides video using ambient light and infrared for low-light situations and audio to a hand-held controller.

“This little thing, everybody looks at it as a toy,” said Cardenaz, who was a colleague of Paugh, a Richmond County sheriff’s deputy fatally shot in the line of duty on Oct. 23, 2011. “Officer safety-wise, it’s tremendous.”

The robot is quiet and can be used to locate armed suspects, confirm the presence of hostages or innocent civilians, monitor the layout of a structure, listen in on conversations and confirm the status of barricaded people.

Sheriff’s office Capt. Butch Askew said it will come in handy most frequently for deputies responding to calls of suicidal people. The throwbot will allow deputies to get information without putting a deputy or canine officer at risk and approach suspects in a less-threatening and stealthier way.

“The biggest thing is just putting eyes on something,” Askew said. “Does he have weapons? Does he have hostages? Has he already committed suicide? Is he in distress?

“It’s just really a lot safer than putting a deputy or a dog in there.”

Askew said such a device was on the sheriff’s office’s list of desired items, but budget restraints never allowed the department to purchase one.

“There’s a difference between have to have and want to have,” Askew said.

Cardenaz, through the foundation, also provided the sheriff’s office with 50 tactical tourniquets.

The tourniquets are designed for quick application in cases of hemorrhages from extremities. Deputies can use them on themselves, each other or civilians in need of assistance.

“These are amazing tools,” said Jordan Desario, of the Georgia Regents University’s Center for Operations Medicine. He is one of the tactical medics for the sheriff’s office’s Special response Team and is responsible for their tactical medical training.

Desario said the long-standing belief that using a tourniquet would result in losing a limb has been debunked. It takes only a few minutes for a person with an arterial hemorrhage to bleed to death, and the tourniquets can be the life-saving device needed for survival in those critical minutes.

Desario said if the tourniquet is applied before the injured person shows signs of shock, they have a 90 percent survivability rate. If it’s applied after symptoms of shock, that rate drops to about 10 percent.

“The sooner we can get this onto someone and have it effectively control bleeding, the better off the patient is,” Desario said.

Cardenaz said he’s glad to hear that the tourniquets are going mainly to the road patrol deputies, who are often first on the scene of wrecks and other incidents.

“If one of those saves a life, saves trauma, for one person, I don’t care if I buy 50 or 5,000, it’s worth it,” Cardenaz said.

Cardenaz said the foundation was founded to raise money for Paugh’s family, who instead wanted the funds to go back to help local law enforcement agencies. Since its inception, the foundation has donated $122,000 worth of supplies and equipment to 11 different local agencies.

Askew said he’s grateful for the donations.

“(Paugh) gave up his life serving, but he still is,” Askew said. “With this memorial, he’s still protecting people through stuff like this.”

Categories: Local

Sheriff's office gets life-saving, crime-fighting donations

The Columbia County Sheriff’s Office recently received a few new gadgets for its tool box.

Michael Cardenaz, president and co-founder of the J.D. Paugh Memorial Foundation, donated some tools to the sheriff’s office Monday, including a Recon Robitics Throwbot XT and 50 Combat Action Tourniquets.

The throwbot, worth $4,800, is an armored, hand-held robot that can be thrown into a variety of critical incident scenes. It can be remotely controlled from a safe distance and provides video using ambient light and infrared for low-light situations and audio to a hand-held controller.

“This little thing, everybody looks at it as a toy,” said Cardenaz, who was a colleague of Paugh, a Richmond County sheriff’s deputy fatally shot in the line of duty on Oct. 23, 2011. “Officer safety-wise, it’s tremendous.”

The robot is quiet and can be used to locate armed suspects, confirm the presence of hostages or innocent civilians, monitor the layout of a structure, listen in on conversations and confirm the status of barricaded people.

Sheriff’s office Capt. Butch Askew said it will come in handy most frequently for deputies responding to calls of suicidal people. The throwbot will allow deputies to get information without putting a deputy or canine officer at risk and approach suspects in a less-threatening and stealthier way.

“The biggest thing is just putting eyes on something,” Askew said. “Does he have weapons? Does he have hostages? Has he already committed suicide? Is he in distress?

“It’s just really a lot safer than putting a deputy or a dog in there.”

Askew said such a device was on the sheriff’s office’s list of desired items, but budget restraints never allowed the department to purchase one.

“There’s a difference between have to have and want to have,” Askew said.

Cardenaz, through the foundation, also provided the sheriff’s office with 50 tactical tourniquets.

The tourniquets are designed for quick application in cases of hemorrhages from extremities. Deputies can use them on themselves, each other or civilians in need of assistance.

“These are amazing tools,” said Jordan Desario, of the Georgia Regents University’s Center for Operations Medicine. He is one of the tactical medics for the sheriff’s office’s Special response Team and is responsible for their tactical medical training.

Desario said the long-standing belief that using a tourniquet would result in losing a limb has been debunked. It takes only a few minutes for a person with an arterial hemorrhage to bleed to death, and the tourniquets can be the life-saving device needed for survival in those critical minutes.

Desario said if the tourniquet is applied before the injured person shows signs of shock, they have a 90 percent survivability rate. If it’s applied after symptoms of shock, that rate drops to about 10 percent.

“The sooner we can get this onto someone and have it effectively control bleeding, the better off the patient is,” Desario said.

Cardenaz said he’s glad to hear that the tourniquets are going mainly to the road patrol deputies, who are often first on the scene of wrecks and other incidents.

“If one of those saves a life, saves trauma, for one person, I don’t care if I buy 50 or 5,000, it’s worth it,” Cardenaz said.

Cardenaz said the foundation was founded to raise money for Paugh’s family, who instead wanted the funds to go back to help local law enforcement agencies. Since its inception, the foundation has donated $122,000 worth of supplies and equipment to 11 different local agencies.

Askew said he’s grateful for the donations.

“(Paugh) gave up his life serving, but he still is,” Askew said. “With this memorial, he’s still protecting people through stuff like this.”

Categories: Local

Officials tell Grovetown, Columbia County residents to brace for change

By Steve Crawford

Publisher

With rapid growth comes growing pains.

That appeared to be the message many Columbia County leaders wanted to convey to the more than 300 people gathered Tuesday at Liberty Park gym in Grovetown.

Representatives from the county government, the school board, the cities of Harlem and Grovetown and Fort Gordon had come together for the fourth annual State of the Community Address, sponsored by the Columbia County Chamber of Commerce.

County Commission Chairman Ron Cross told everyone to be prepared for many years of road construction.

Miles of Washington Road, a William Few Parkway extension, River Watch Parkway and other traffic arteries will be in various stages of construction over the next few years, and more construction is planned well into the next decade. More roundabouts and bike lanes are also planned.

Cross said there was one thing, however, residents should not expect soon. “I don’t know anything about a new gate at Fort Gordon,” he said, estimating that such a project would cost $100 million. “That’s something I still think needs to start in Washington, well above our heads.”

Fort Gordon Garrison Commander Col. Samuel Anderson said the subject was being discussed with the “most senior leaders” in the Army chain of command.

“This is my No. 1 construction project at Fort Gordon,” Anderson said. “Unfortunately, we are not going to see a spade put in the ground any time soon.”

In the meantime, local communities will continue to see growth from an expected 10,000 military personnel and families moving to the area by 2019. That doesn’t include civilian job growth associated with military contractors and other companies, he said.

“The one thing I can’t emphasis enough is that this growth is happening now,” Anderson said, pointing out the more than 570 new students in county schools as evidence.

Grovetown Mayor George James doesn’t need any new evidence. He said he sees it outside on Robinson Avenue every day.

“Morning and afternoon, Robinson Avenue is bumper to bumper to bumper,” he said. “But change is coming.”

James said the city has a plan to address the traffic jams going to and from Fort Gordon, which should move commuters through the city faster and provide alternative routes for city residents.

“You are going to see Robinson Avenue changed, and Wrightsboro Road changed,” he said. “It is going to be all for the better of the community.”

Categories: Local

Officials tell Grovetown, Columbia County residents to brace for change

By Steve Crawford

Publisher

With rapid growth comes growing pains.

That appeared to be the message many Columbia County leaders wanted to convey to the more than 300 people gathered Tuesday at Liberty Park gym in Grovetown.

Representatives from the county government, the school board, the cities of Harlem and Grovetown and Fort Gordon had come together for the fourth annual State of the Community Address, sponsored by the Columbia County Chamber of Commerce.

County Commission Chairman Ron Cross told everyone to be prepared for many years of road construction.

Miles of Washington Road, a William Few Parkway extension, River Watch Parkway and other traffic arteries will be in various stages of construction over the next few years, and more construction is planned well into the next decade. More roundabouts and bike lanes are also planned.

Cross said there was one thing, however, residents should not expect soon. “I don’t know anything about a new gate at Fort Gordon,” he said, estimating that such a project would cost $100 million. “That’s something I still think needs to start in Washington, well above our heads.”

Fort Gordon Garrison Commander Col. Samuel Anderson said the subject was being discussed with the “most senior leaders” in the Army chain of command.

“This is my No. 1 construction project at Fort Gordon,” Anderson said. “Unfortunately, we are not going to see a spade put in the ground any time soon.”

In the meantime, local communities will continue to see growth from an expected 10,000 military personnel and families moving to the area by 2019. That doesn’t include civilian job growth associated with military contractors and other companies, he said.

“The one thing I can’t emphasis enough is that this growth is happening now,” Anderson said, pointing out the more than 570 new students in county schools as evidence.

Grovetown Mayor George James doesn’t need any new evidence. He said he sees it outside on Robinson Avenue every day.

“Morning and afternoon, Robinson Avenue is bumper to bumper to bumper,” he said. “But change is coming.”

James said the city has a plan to address the traffic jams going to and from Fort Gordon, which should move commuters through the city faster and provide alternative routes for city residents.

“You are going to see Robinson Avenue changed, and Wrightsboro Road changed,” he said. “It is going to be all for the better of the community.”

Categories: Local

Police Blotter, Sept. 28, 2014

Inmate found dead in jail cell

An inmate in the Columbia County Detention Center was found dead in his cell Monday evening.

A jailer said he was serving dinner to inmates and noticed Troy Michael Smith, 50, of Grovetown, face-down on a pillow in his cell. Smith didn’t respond to efforts by the jail’s medical team, according to Columbia County Coroner Vernon Collins.

Collins said Smith had a seizure disorder and was on medication. He thinks Smith’s death was from a compromised airway due to a seizure.

An autopsy was performed at the Georgia Bureau of Investigation Crime Lab in Atanta on Wednesday. The official cause of death will not be released until toxicology results come back.

The following accounts were taken from Columbia County Sheriff’s Office incident reports:

Man’s truck is hit by gunfire

A Grovetown man told authorities Monday that someone shot into his truck.

The 26-year-old man said his truck was hit between midnight and 6:30 a.m. while it was parked in the street in front of the home.

Deputies found what appeared to be a bullet hole all the way through the passenger door and a bullet fragment on the floorboard.

A second bullet came through the hood of the truck and two .380 bullet casings were found in the street.

Burglar kicks in door at home

A Martinez woman said a burglar kicked in her front door early Wednesday.

The 20-year-old woman said she found her front door kicked in just after 1 a.m. The burglar stole a television from the master bedroom, went through drawers in the second bedroom and unplugged a television in that room.

The burglar did not take $80 or the television from the second bedroom.

Deputies found fingerprints on the television, DVD player and a shoeprint on the front door.

Wallet thief binge spends

Whoever stole a man’s wallet recently went on a spending spree with his stolen credit cards.

A 60-year-old man said his wallet was stolen from the Home Depot on Belair Road in Evans on Tuesday. When he called his credit card companies, the man said he discovered someone had used them fraudulently.

The man said someone spent $1,500 on one card, $600 on a second and $3,000 with a third credit card.

Categories: Local

Police Blotter, Sept. 28, 2014

Inmate found dead in jail cell

An inmate in the Columbia County Detention Center was found dead in his cell Monday evening.

A jailer said he was serving dinner to inmates and noticed Troy Michael Smith, 50, of Grovetown, face-down on a pillow in his cell. Smith didn’t respond to efforts by the jail’s medical team, according to Columbia County Coroner Vernon Collins.

Collins said Smith had a seizure disorder and was on medication. He thinks Smith’s death was from a compromised airway due to a seizure.

An autopsy was performed at the Georgia Bureau of Investigation Crime Lab in Atanta on Wednesday. The official cause of death will not be released until toxicology results come back.

The following accounts were taken from Columbia County Sheriff’s Office incident reports:

Man’s truck is hit by gunfire

A Grovetown man told authorities Monday that someone shot into his truck.

The 26-year-old man said his truck was hit between midnight and 6:30 a.m. while it was parked in the street in front of the home.

Deputies found what appeared to be a bullet hole all the way through the passenger door and a bullet fragment on the floorboard.

A second bullet came through the hood of the truck and two .380 bullet casings were found in the street.

Burglar kicks in door at home

A Martinez woman said a burglar kicked in her front door early Wednesday.

The 20-year-old woman said she found her front door kicked in just after 1 a.m. The burglar stole a television from the master bedroom, went through drawers in the second bedroom and unplugged a television in that room.

The burglar did not take $80 or the television from the second bedroom.

Deputies found fingerprints on the television, DVD player and a shoeprint on the front door.

Wallet thief binge spends

Whoever stole a man’s wallet recently went on a spending spree with his stolen credit cards.

A 60-year-old man said his wallet was stolen from the Home Depot on Belair Road in Evans on Tuesday. When he called his credit card companies, the man said he discovered someone had used them fraudulently.

The man said someone spent $1,500 on one card, $600 on a second and $3,000 with a third credit card.

Categories: Local

Powerball - 09/27/2014

Georgia Lottery - Sun, 9/28/2014 12:00 AM
02-11-35-52-54 Powerball: 13 Power Play: 3X Estimated Jackpot: $50 Million
Categories: Local

Fantasy 5 - 09/27/2014

Georgia Lottery - Sun, 9/28/2014 12:00 AM
01-03-11-16-27 Estimated Jackpot: $217,000
Categories: Local

Tigers wear down Bulldogs

The Harlem High School Bulldogs played Swainsboro tough in the first half Friday night but were overwhelmed in the second half.
The Bulldogs trailed the Tigers just 14-6 at halftime, but the Tigers scored two plays into the third quarter and rolled to the 48-12 win.
"We were outmanned," said Harlem coach Jimmie Lewis, who thought his team played well in the first half. "In the second half we gave out, but I'm proud of the effort, they gave everything they had the whole night."
The Tigers rushed for 90 yards in the first half and kept the ball on the ground exclusively in the second half, finishing with 312 rushing yards on 48 carries. Taking the second half kickoff, they scored on a Terry Buley 18-yard run after Stanford ripped off a 33-yard gain on the first play from scrimmage and they went on from there.
Conversely, the Bulldogs rushed for 54 yards led by Bailey Postell who toted it 18 times for 54 yards.
"We sent him in there to see what he could do," said Lewis of Postell. "They were just too big up front, they stopped us up front. It's hard to run when you're giving away 40-50 pounds a man."
The win gave the Tigers (2-3, 1-0) a leg up in both squads' foray into Region 3-AA play as the Bulldogs dropped to 1-4, 0-1.
The halftime score could have been much different but the Tigers were able to take advantage of two Bulldogs' miscues.
After the Tigers defense sacked Bulldogs quarterback Hunter Rippe and recovered the ensuing fumble, Tigers quarterback Trey Amerson found Eddie Braswell running free down the middle for a 34-yard touchdown with 4:04 left in the first quarter.
It was the only completion for Amerson who attempted just two passes.
The Bulldogs defense was effective in th first half, holding on downs and forcing three punts. The Bulldogs shot themselves in the foot at the end of the half, however. A 24-yard punt from their own 16 and a personal foul penalty gave the Tigers first down at the Bulldogs' 25. Timothy Stanford rushed for 23 yards down to the 2 and punched it in on the next play with 2:10 left in the half.
The sophomore Stanford paced the Tigers' attack carrying the ball 18 times for 169 yards and two touchdowns.
Unable to run, the Bulldogs' aerial attack clicked. Rippe was 13-of-19 for 155 yards and threw scoring strikes of eight yards and one yard.
Down 7-0, Harlem mixed runs and passes on an 11-play, 62-yard scoring drive. Under pressure on third down from the 8, Rippe stood tall in the pocket and found Kurt Muns in the middle of the end zone for the touchdown.

Categories: Local

Tigers wear down Bulldogs

The Harlem High School Bulldogs played Swainsboro tough in the first half Friday night but were overwhelmed in the second half.
The Bulldogs trailed the Tigers just 14-6 at halftime, but the Tigers scored two plays into the third quarter and rolled to the 48-12 win.
"We were outmanned," said Harlem coach Jimmie Lewis, who thought his team played well in the first half. "In the second half we gave out, but I'm proud of the effort, they gave everything they had the whole night."
The Tigers rushed for 90 yards in the first half and kept the ball on the ground exclusively in the second half, finishing with 312 rushing yards on 48 carries. Taking the second half kickoff, they scored on a Terry Buley 18-yard run after Stanford ripped off a 33-yard gain on the first play from scrimmage and they went on from there.
Conversely, the Bulldogs rushed for 54 yards led by Bailey Postell who toted it 18 times for 54 yards.
"We sent him in there to see what he could do," said Lewis of Postell. "They were just too big up front, they stopped us up front. It's hard to run when you're giving away 40-50 pounds a man."
The win gave the Tigers (2-3, 1-0) a leg up in both squads' foray into Region 3-AA play as the Bulldogs dropped to 1-4, 0-1.
The halftime score could have been much different but the Tigers were able to take advantage of two Bulldogs' miscues.
After the Tigers defense sacked Bulldogs quarterback Hunter Rippe and recovered the ensuing fumble, Tigers quarterback Trey Amerson found Eddie Braswell running free down the middle for a 34-yard touchdown with 4:04 left in the first quarter.
It was the only completion for Amerson who attempted just two passes.
The Bulldogs defense was effective in th first half, holding on downs and forcing three punts. The Bulldogs shot themselves in the foot at the end of the half, however. A 24-yard punt from their own 16 and a personal foul penalty gave the Tigers first down at the Bulldogs' 25. Timothy Stanford rushed for 23 yards down to the 2 and punched it in on the next play with 2:10 left in the half.
The sophomore Stanford paced the Tigers' attack carrying the ball 18 times for 169 yards and two touchdowns.
Unable to run, the Bulldogs' aerial attack clicked. Rippe was 13-of-19 for 155 yards and threw scoring strikes of eight yards and one yard.
Down 7-0, Harlem mixed runs and passes on an 11-play, 62-yard scoring drive. Under pressure on third down from the 8, Rippe stood tall in the pocket and found Kurt Muns in the middle of the end zone for the touchdown.

Categories: Local

Mega Millions - 09/26/2014

Georgia Lottery - Sat, 9/27/2014 12:00 AM
17-26-35-46-62 Mega Ball: 09 Megaplier: 5X Estimated Jackpot: $105 Million
Categories: Local

Fantasy 5 - 09/26/2014

Georgia Lottery - Sat, 9/27/2014 12:00 AM
02-10-11-29-31 Estimated Jackpot: $150,000
Categories: Local

One positive reaction to TB test at Martinez Elementary

One person at Martinez Elementary School reacted positively to a tuberculosis skin test a week after a fourth-grader was removed from school for possible exposure to the disease.

The Columbia County Health Department administered the test to 62 children and adults at the school in Evans on Sept. 24 and results were disclosed on Friday, said the health department’s county Nurse Manager Linda Graves.

“We had one person to react,” Graves said. “That person is not considered a respiratory threat to anyone else.”

Graves would not say if the person who tested positive was a child or adult, but that they were not removed form the school setting.

“That person will have a follow-up evaluation, which will be a chest X-ray,” Graves said.

The health department was informed on Sept. 18 by a doctor that the fourth-grader had an abnormal chest X-ray and was possibly exposed to TB. He was sent home until he could be further evaluated. It has not been confirmed that he has TB.

As a precaution, the health department provided free TB tests to the boy’s classmates, teachers and those who ride the school bus with him.

“This is still a suspect case,” Graves said. “We want to make sure that everyone who was possibly exposed at this point, until we have confirmation, has the opportunity to be tested,” Graves said.

School system Super-intendent Dr. Sandra Carraway said the boy moved from an overseas country and enrolled in school in late August. Immigrants are typically required to take a TB test, Graves said.

Carraway said the school system is “cooperating to the fullest degree” and will take any necessary steps when the TB status of the boy and the person who reacted positively are confirmed. “Literally, we’ll have to wait and see,” Carraway said.

Graves said if both of the tests are negative, then nothing further needs to be done. If one of the tests confirms tuberculosis, then all the people who tested negatively on Wednesday will be retested in eight-10 weeks.

TB is an infectious disease caused by a bacteria that attacks the lungs. Repeated exposure over a long period of time to a person who is contagious is usually required to contract the disease, according to the letter sent to parents from the Georgia Department of Public Health.

Categories: Local

One positive reaction to TB test at Martinez Elementary

One person at Martinez Elementary School reacted positively to a tuberculosis skin test a week after a fourth-grader was removed from school for possible exposure to the disease.

The Columbia County Health Department administered the test to 62 children and adults at the school in Evans on Sept. 24 and results were disclosed on Friday, said the health department’s county Nurse Manager Linda Graves.

“We had one person to react,” Graves said. “That person is not considered a respiratory threat to anyone else.”

Graves would not say if the person who tested positive was a child or adult, but that they were not removed form the school setting.

“That person will have a follow-up evaluation, which will be a chest X-ray,” Graves said.

The health department was informed on Sept. 18 by a doctor that the fourth-grader had an abnormal chest X-ray and was possibly exposed to TB. He was sent home until he could be further evaluated. It has not been confirmed that he has TB.

As a precaution, the health department provided free TB tests to the boy’s classmates, teachers and those who ride the school bus with him.

“This is still a suspect case,” Graves said. “We want to make sure that everyone who was possibly exposed at this point, until we have confirmation, has the opportunity to be tested,” Graves said.

School system Super-intendent Dr. Sandra Carraway said the boy moved from an overseas country and enrolled in school in late August. Immigrants are typically required to take a TB test, Graves said.

Carraway said the school system is “cooperating to the fullest degree” and will take any necessary steps when the TB status of the boy and the person who reacted positively are confirmed. “Literally, we’ll have to wait and see,” Carraway said.

Graves said if both of the tests are negative, then nothing further needs to be done. If one of the tests confirms tuberculosis, then all the people who tested negatively on Wednesday will be retested in eight-10 weeks.

TB is an infectious disease caused by a bacteria that attacks the lungs. Repeated exposure over a long period of time to a person who is contagious is usually required to contract the disease, according to the letter sent to parents from the Georgia Department of Public Health.

Categories: Local

Murder suspect indicted, extradited

A Florida man recently indicted in the August 14 murder of a Martinez man was extradited back to Columbia County Friday.

Daniel Nelson Robinson, 21, of Jacksonville, arrived at the Columbia County Detention Center just before 2 p.m., according to Columbia County sheriff's Capt. Steve Morris.

Robinson was captured more than a month ago, several hours after police say he shot William "Bill" DaVitte, 55, and assaulted his wife in the parking lot of Marvin United Methodist Church.

A Columbia County Grand Jury indicted Robinson this week on charges of murder, armed robbery, aggravated assault, hijacking a motor vehicle, and two counts of possession of a firearm during the commission of a crime, according to court records released Friday.

After discussions with Florida authorities, District Attorney Ashley Wright said they opted to pursue the most serious charges first, the Columbia County murder charge. Florida authorities were holding Robinson on several charges including motor vehicle theft, resisting arrest, fleeing and attempting to elude law enforcement, reckless driving, trespassing and driving without a license, according to Jacksonville Sheriff's Office records.

Robinson is being held in the jail without bond.

Authorities said that DaVitte's wife was sitting in the passenger seat of their 2010 gold Nissan Murano in the parking lot at about 10:30 p.m. when police say Robinson approached her.

"He tapped on the window and demanded she open the door," Morris said after the incident. "And he started beating her with the handgun."

DaVitte came running when he heard his wife scream and honk the horn. As he approached, police say Robinson shot him three times. Columbia County Coroner Vernon Collins said he pronounced DaVitte dead at the scene. His wife was treated at Georgia Regents Medical Center for her injuries.

Morris said Robinson fled in the couple's vehicle.

Morris said they believed Robinson was headed toward Florida and notified Florida authorities about the incident. They spotted the vehicle just before 5 a.m. near Jacksonville and a pursuit ensued, Morris said. Robinson abandoned the vehicle and ran. Authorities set up a perimeter and he was quickly captured.

Robinson has been held by Jacksonville authorities since his arrest.

Since 2011, Robinson has been arrested by the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office at least seven times. Records indicate Robinson got out of jail in February.

Categories: Local

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