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Powerball - 09/02/2015

Georgia Lottery - Thu, 9/3/2015 12:00 AM
17-22-30-46-56 Powerball: 16 Power Play: 3X Estimated Jackpot: $133 Million
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Fantasy 5 - 09/02/2015

Georgia Lottery - Thu, 9/3/2015 12:00 AM
06-11-16-18-37 Estimated Jackpot: $211,000
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Lady Bulldogs win big over Cross Creek

A night after both teams played hard-fought games in their respective regions, the Harlem High School Lady Bulldogs proved to be too much for Cross Creek Wednesday night.
The Class AA Lady Bulldogs (10-2) ran their record against Region 2-AAAAA teams to 3-0 for the year with their 11-1 win.
"As long as we get good pitching and we just put the ball in play it gives us a good chance to win," Harlem coach Mike Leverett said.
Leverett got both Wednesday night. The Lady Bulldogs got to the Lady Razorbacks (12-3) for the 11 runs on 12 hits led by senior Bailey Sheppard, who was three for four with two doubles and four RBI. Her first double came as part of the Lady Bulldogs' five-run fifth inning, all scoring with two outs. Her gapper drove in sophomore Jaylyn Norman(2-3) who had singled home two runs.
By the end, leadoff batter Madison Summers had scored three times and No. 2 batter Anasja Sanders scored twice.
"We've been struggling at the top (of the lineup)," Leverett said. "I've been moving people around, moving people around and today they just kind of clicked a little bit, putting the ball in play, doing what they're supposed to do and not trying to hit the ball out of the ballpark, just putting the ball in play and it worked out good for us."
Sheppard knows they can be dangerous if they play to their potential.
"We definitely have a lot of talent on this team but we've still got to play hard," Sheppard said.
A night after pitching the Lady Bulldogs to a Region 3-AA win over Metter, senior Amber Garrett ran her record to 8-1. She went 3 2/3 innings, striking out five and walking four. Leverett gave his ace the rest of the night off with two outs and the bases loaded after she walked in the Lady Razorbacks' only run.
"Amber's (Garrett) throwing the ball good right now, she threw seven innings yesterday and I took her out because I figured she was tired," Leverett said.
Leverett turned to freshman left-hander Skyler Wiggins and the move paid off as Wiggins got the inning-ending strikeout, She would finish with five strikeouts while allowing just two hits.

Categories: Local

Lady Bulldogs win big over Cross Creek

A night after both teams played hard-fought games in their respective regions, the Harlem High School Lady Bulldogs proved to be too much for Cross Creek Wednesday night.
The Class AA Lady Bulldogs (10-2) ran their record against Region 2-AAAAA teams to 3-0 for the year with their 11-1 win.
"As long as we get good pitching and we just put the ball in play it gives us a good chance to win," Harlem coach Mike Leverett said.
Leverett got both Wednesday night. The Lady Bulldogs got to the Lady Razorbacks (12-3) for the 11 runs on 12 hits led by senior Bailey Sheppard, who was three for four with two doubles and four RBI. Her first double came as part of the Lady Bulldogs' five-run fifth inning, all scoring with two outs. Her gapper drove in sophomore Jaylyn Norman(2-3) who had singled home two runs.
By the end, leadoff batter Madison Summers had scored three times and No. 2 batter Anasja Sanders scored twice.
"We've been struggling at the top (of the lineup)," Leverett said. "I've been moving people around, moving people around and today they just kind of clicked a little bit, putting the ball in play, doing what they're supposed to do and not trying to hit the ball out of the ballpark, just putting the ball in play and it worked out good for us."
Sheppard knows they can be dangerous if they play to their potential.
"We definitely have a lot of talent on this team but we've still got to play hard," Sheppard said.
A night after pitching the Lady Bulldogs to a Region 3-AA win over Metter, senior Amber Garrett ran her record to 8-1. She went 3 2/3 innings, striking out five and walking four. Leverett gave his ace the rest of the night off with two outs and the bases loaded after she walked in the Lady Razorbacks' only run.
"Amber's (Garrett) throwing the ball good right now, she threw seven innings yesterday and I took her out because I figured she was tired," Leverett said.
Leverett turned to freshman left-hander Skyler Wiggins and the move paid off as Wiggins got the inning-ending strikeout, She would finish with five strikeouts while allowing just two hits.

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SC corrections officer released after weekend arrest

 

A South Carolina corrections officer was released from jail Wednesday after a weekend arrest for assaulting his estranged wife’s former lover.

Devan William Harrison, 24, of Lincolnton, was charged with aggravated battery on Sunday. He was released from the Columbia County Detention Center Wednesday after posting a $25,100 bond, according to jailers.

A 24-year-old Augusta man said that Harrison assaulted him in front of Harrison’s wife’s home in Martinez. He told deputies that he went to the woman’s door at about 2 p.m. and knocked. As he waited for her to answer the door, Harrison arrived and approached him. He said Harrison put him in a choke hold and hit him in the face several times, according to a Columbia County Sheriff’s Office incident report.

Harrison’s wife said she was taking a bath when she heard arguing outside. She went to the door and saw her husband outside and her former lover driving away. Harrison said he’d hit the man, according to the report.

Harrison, who is a corrections officer at McCormick Correctional Institution in McCormick, S.C., told authorities that his wife and the other man had a previous sexual relationship and that his wife said she wouldn’t talk to him anymore. He left his home in Lincolnton headed for her house. He was nearly there, when Harrison said he got a text message from his wife who said the other man was at her house.

When Harrison arrived, he said saw the other man at the front door. He got out of his truck, put an MMA mouth protector in his mouth, approached the man and took off his shirt in case there was an altercation, according to the report. He told the other man to leave, but said the other man took a wider stance and smirked. Harrison said he then tried to push the man toward his vehicle to leave.

The other man was in a position to head back to the house or attack him by grabbing his legs. Because he feared the attack, Harrison said he jumped on the man’s back before he gained good footing. He told deputies he put the man in a “blood choke” hold and they fell to the ground, according to the report. Because he felt the man was gaining a dominant position in the fight, Harrison said he punched him in the eye three times and once in the stomach. When the man jolted upright and startled Harrison, he punched him again.

Harrison said he told the man to leave and he did. He then argued with his wife for a short time before leaving.

The other man drove to Doctors Hospital and called authorities. His right was swollen shut and doctors told a deputy that he suffered fractures along his orbital bone, according to the report.

Categories: Local

SC corrections officer released after weekend arrest

 

A South Carolina corrections officer was released from jail Wednesday after a weekend arrest for assaulting his estranged wife’s former lover.

Devan William Harrison, 24, of Lincolnton, was charged with aggravated battery on Sunday. He was released from the Columbia County Detention Center Wednesday after posting a $25,100 bond, according to jailers.

A 24-year-old Augusta man said that Harrison assaulted him in front of Harrison’s wife’s home in Martinez. He told deputies that he went to the woman’s door at about 2 p.m. and knocked. As he waited for her to answer the door, Harrison arrived and approached him. He said Harrison put him in a choke hold and hit him in the face several times, according to a Columbia County Sheriff’s Office incident report.

Harrison’s wife said she was taking a bath when she heard arguing outside. She went to the door and saw her husband outside and her former lover driving away. Harrison said he’d hit the man, according to the report.

Harrison, who is a corrections officer at McCormick Correctional Institution in McCormick, S.C., told authorities that his wife and the other man had a previous sexual relationship and that his wife said she wouldn’t talk to him anymore. He left his home in Lincolnton headed for her house. He was nearly there, when Harrison said he got a text message from his wife who said the other man was at her house.

When Harrison arrived, he said saw the other man at the front door. He got out of his truck, put an MMA mouth protector in his mouth, approached the man and took off his shirt in case there was an altercation, according to the report. He told the other man to leave, but said the other man took a wider stance and smirked. Harrison said he then tried to push the man toward his vehicle to leave.

The other man was in a position to head back to the house or attack him by grabbing his legs. Because he feared the attack, Harrison said he jumped on the man’s back before he gained good footing. He told deputies he put the man in a “blood choke” hold and they fell to the ground, according to the report. Because he felt the man was gaining a dominant position in the fight, Harrison said he punched him in the eye three times and once in the stomach. When the man jolted upright and startled Harrison, he punched him again.

Harrison said he told the man to leave and he did. He then argued with his wife for a short time before leaving.

The other man drove to Doctors Hospital and called authorities. His right was swollen shut and doctors told a deputy that he suffered fractures along his orbital bone, according to the report.

Categories: Local

Athlete Spotlight for Wednesday, September 2, 2015 - Lauren Thompson and Hannah Williamson.

 

In an early season Region 2-AAAAA game against Evans on Thursday, Greenbrier High School’s Lauren Thompson singled twice and scored twice while catcher Hannah Williamson doubled and hit a three-run homer as the Lady Wolfpack went on to the win.

Thompson is getting her first extended playing time at the varsity level and is multifaceted. While batting as the Lady Wolfpack’s designated player, she also plays first base and pitches while Williamson is the team’s on-field leader from her catcher position. What both provide is experience and senior leadership that coach Garrett Black relies on.

“Excellence is a daily habit with them and it’s not just down here on the softball field, it’s in the classroom,” Black said. “They take pride in everything they do, they go the extra mile. We always talk about being successful requires you to do things that average people don’t want to do.

‘‘These two kids, they carry that mindset into softball and really where I’m very proud is how they carry it into the classroom. Both of them are excellent students.”

The Lady Wolfpack are 9-2 thus far and they have hopes of winning a second consecutive Class AAAAA state title. Thompson thinks it’s possible if they go about it the right way.

“We just need to come out here every day and attack it like it’s a new day, get better every single day and expect nothing less than greatness,” Thompson said. “Reach our potential at the right time so we can make it all the way again.”

She’s been waiting for her chance and is proving herself on the field.

“I feel like I’m ready for it, so I’m not as nervous as I think I could be,” Thompson said. “I just want to step up and prove that I should be where I am out there.”

Even with some other seniors on the squad, Williamson is continuing to have a strong presence.

“Last year we had five seniors on the field so I was a big voice on the field last year, but we also had five girls that were on top of things, too,” Williamson said. “This year there’s a lot of girls out there that are getting their first taste of it, and I think that’s making me work a little more to be a better leader for them.”

Williamson will be heading to Mercer University, where she’ll study something in the medical field, as a catcher next year, but she dabbled at another position early on.

“I started off in rec ball and that’s when everybody wants to be a pitcher, so I tried out pitching and it didn’t work,” Williamson said.

“I remember one practice pitching, I couldn’t pitch a strike so I was like can I just go put my gear back on, this isn’t fun. I just started catching and kept on catching from then.”

Thompson has been playing since she was 8 or 9 and loves the relationships she’s built with her teammates, but this will be the end of softball for her.

“I want to go to the University of Georgia or Georgia Tech – ‘she’s a genius,’ interjected Williamson – and I think I want to go into biomedical engineering and hopefully go into medical school,” Thompson said.

No matter what the future may hold for the pair, Black is glad they’re on his team.

“I want to be in the trenches with somebody that wants to excel in all areas of their life and that’s what these two kids do.”

Categories: Local

Athlete Spotlight for Wednesday, September 2, 2015 - Lauren Thompson and Hannah Williamson.

 

In an early season Region 2-AAAAA game against Evans on Thursday, Greenbrier High School’s Lauren Thompson singled twice and scored twice while catcher Hannah Williamson doubled and hit a three-run homer as the Lady Wolfpack went on to the win.

Thompson is getting her first extended playing time at the varsity level and is multifaceted. While batting as the Lady Wolfpack’s designated player, she also plays first base and pitches while Williamson is the team’s on-field leader from her catcher position. What both provide is experience and senior leadership that coach Garrett Black relies on.

“Excellence is a daily habit with them and it’s not just down here on the softball field, it’s in the classroom,” Black said. “They take pride in everything they do, they go the extra mile. We always talk about being successful requires you to do things that average people don’t want to do.

‘‘These two kids, they carry that mindset into softball and really where I’m very proud is how they carry it into the classroom. Both of them are excellent students.”

The Lady Wolfpack are 9-2 thus far and they have hopes of winning a second consecutive Class AAAAA state title. Thompson thinks it’s possible if they go about it the right way.

“We just need to come out here every day and attack it like it’s a new day, get better every single day and expect nothing less than greatness,” Thompson said. “Reach our potential at the right time so we can make it all the way again.”

She’s been waiting for her chance and is proving herself on the field.

“I feel like I’m ready for it, so I’m not as nervous as I think I could be,” Thompson said. “I just want to step up and prove that I should be where I am out there.”

Even with some other seniors on the squad, Williamson is continuing to have a strong presence.

“Last year we had five seniors on the field so I was a big voice on the field last year, but we also had five girls that were on top of things, too,” Williamson said. “This year there’s a lot of girls out there that are getting their first taste of it, and I think that’s making me work a little more to be a better leader for them.”

Williamson will be heading to Mercer University, where she’ll study something in the medical field, as a catcher next year, but she dabbled at another position early on.

“I started off in rec ball and that’s when everybody wants to be a pitcher, so I tried out pitching and it didn’t work,” Williamson said.

“I remember one practice pitching, I couldn’t pitch a strike so I was like can I just go put my gear back on, this isn’t fun. I just started catching and kept on catching from then.”

Thompson has been playing since she was 8 or 9 and loves the relationships she’s built with her teammates, but this will be the end of softball for her.

“I want to go to the University of Georgia or Georgia Tech – ‘she’s a genius,’ interjected Williamson – and I think I want to go into biomedical engineering and hopefully go into medical school,” Thompson said.

No matter what the future may hold for the pair, Black is glad they’re on his team.

“I want to be in the trenches with somebody that wants to excel in all areas of their life and that’s what these two kids do.”

Categories: Local

Items stolen from burned Marshall Square apartment

A former resident of Marshall Square Retirement Resort, which burned in June, told authorities Thursday that items were stolen from her apartment.

The 81-year-old woman, who lived at the complex in Evans with her husband, said they were told by the CEO of Resort Lifestyle Communities that the June 2 early-morning fire that killed a fellow resident severely damaged their third-floor apartment and it was a total loss, according to a Columbia County Sheriff’s Office incident report. She was told nothing was salvageable from their apartment and the CEO provided the couple a letter confirming the loss for the couple’s insurance company.

The woman said she was at the Marshall Square site on Aug. 19 for the demolition of the area of the building where she formerly lived. When the exterior wall was removed, the woman saw her apartment and some of its remaining contents. She approached the general contractor on the site, who agreed to use a bucket truck to check the apartment for salvageable items, according to the report.

On Aug. 20-21, a worker used a bucket truck to check the apartment and retrieved some important paperwork and some items of sentimental value. She was told that her dresser drawers and jewelry chest hadn’t burned, but had been ransacked. She said an $800 four-piece setting of silver flatware that belonged to her late mother was missing from her armoire and $300 cash was missing from the top drawer of her chest, according to the report.

The woman provided deputies with a list of the missing items and photos taken prior to the demolition.

Categories: Local

Items stolen from burned Marshall Square apartment

A former resident of Marshall Square Retirement Resort, which burned in June, told authorities Thursday that items were stolen from her apartment.

The 81-year-old woman, who lived at the complex in Evans with her husband, said they were told by the CEO of Resort Lifestyle Communities that the June 2 early-morning fire that killed a fellow resident severely damaged their third-floor apartment and it was a total loss, according to a Columbia County Sheriff’s Office incident report. She was told nothing was salvageable from their apartment and the CEO provided the couple a letter confirming the loss for the couple’s insurance company.

The woman said she was at the Marshall Square site on Aug. 19 for the demolition of the area of the building where she formerly lived. When the exterior wall was removed, the woman saw her apartment and some of its remaining contents. She approached the general contractor on the site, who agreed to use a bucket truck to check the apartment for salvageable items, according to the report.

On Aug. 20-21, a worker used a bucket truck to check the apartment and retrieved some important paperwork and some items of sentimental value. She was told that her dresser drawers and jewelry chest hadn’t burned, but had been ransacked. She said an $800 four-piece setting of silver flatware that belonged to her late mother was missing from her armoire and $300 cash was missing from the top drawer of her chest, according to the report.

The woman provided deputies with a list of the missing items and photos taken prior to the demolition.

Categories: Local

Columbia County Fair pageant applications available

Applications are being accepted for the 2015 Miss Columbia County Fair Scholarship Pageant.

The pageant will be held at 7 p.m. Oct. 10 at Greenbrier High School.

Contestants must be ages 17-23 and turn 17 by Dec. 31.

They will be judged in interview, casual wear and evening gown competitions.

The winner will represent the Columbia County Fair at the state pageant in Atlanta.

The entry deadline is Oct. 5. An application is available online at www.columbiacountyfair.net.

For more information, call Pat Becton at (706) 863-7645 or send an e-mail to pbecton@knology.net.

Categories: Local

Columbia County Fair pageant applications available

Applications are being accepted for the 2015 Miss Columbia County Fair Scholarship Pageant.

The pageant will be held at 7 p.m. Oct. 10 at Greenbrier High School.

Contestants must be ages 17-23 and turn 17 by Dec. 31.

They will be judged in interview, casual wear and evening gown competitions.

The winner will represent the Columbia County Fair at the state pageant in Atlanta.

The entry deadline is Oct. 5. An application is available online at www.columbiacountyfair.net.

For more information, call Pat Becton at (706) 863-7645 or send an e-mail to pbecton@knology.net.

Categories: Local

State, local officials urge disaster preparations

Pam Tucker has a simple philosophy: Be prepared, not overwhelmed.

Before disaster strikes, Tucker – the director of Columbia County’s Emergency and Operations Division – urges residents to have bottled water, canned food and a first-aid kit, while recommending other items such as solar lighting, a flashlight and portable radio.

“I’m not telling our citizens to become survivalists,” Tucker said. “Because when people get overwhelmed, they won’t do anything. But here’s my advice: Make a checklist, and each time you go to the store, purchase another item off the list. Water is most important, then food and a first-aid kit.”

To promote the importance of preparing before disasters strike, Gov. Nathan Deal has proclaimed September National Prepared­ness Month in Georgia and encourages residents to get fully prepared. According to an annual survey, 80 percent of Georgians report being at least somewhat prepared for a large-scale disaster or emergency, a 27 percent increase since the Ready Georgia campaign launched in 2008.

Ready Georgia promotes three key steps to readiness: be informed about potential threats and protective measures to take in emergency situations; make a plan for communicating and reconnecting with family members if you are separated during an emergency; and build
a kit of emergency supplies that allows you and your family to be self-sufficient for up to 72 hours after a disaster.

Most Georgians have stocked key emergency supplies at home, including a flashlight with extra batteries (85 percent), a first-aid kit (71 percent) and a three-day supply of water and nonperishable food (67 percent). However, only 36 percent of Georgians have arranged a family meeting place or reconnection plan, and just 27 percent have purchased a NOAA weather radio, according to a news release from Ready Georgia.

“What we’re stressing is the essentials to survival,” Tucker said. “If you choose to go overboard, that’s fine, too, but my goal is for 100 percent of our residents to at least have a three-day supply of water per person, canned food, a radio and a first-aid kit. If you have pets, please account for water for them as well.”

Tucker’s disaster preparedness came in handy during the 2014 ice storm. Although Columbia County’s water never shut off, Tucker and her husband had to cope with a power outage.

As the temperature in their home plummeted, Tuck­er turned on her gas fireplace and her husband closed off openings in their den with plastic sheeting.

“This plastic is just another way to stay prepared for emergencies,” Tucker said, pointing to a box. “Our entire house was freezing,
but the den stayed 72 degrees. … The more supplies you have, the more innovative you can be. But please, please do not use candles.”

National Preparedness Month was started after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks to increase awareness and encourage action for emergency preparedness nationwide.

Throughout Sep­tember, the Ready Georgia campaign will join a nationwide coalition of thousands of private, public and nonprofit organizations, each holding local events designed to motivate people to prepare for emergencies.

“It’s great to see that more Georgians are stocking supplies, but it’s also essential to have a plan,” said Georgia Emergency Management Agen­cy Director Jim Butter­worth. “Disasters
don’t wait to strike when you’re at home. They may hit when your family is separated at work or school.”

Columbia County will hold a Prepare & Aware Day on Oct. 10 at its emergency operations center on Ronald Reagan Drive. The public is invited, and six disaster kits will be given away as door prizes.

Categories: Local

State, local officials urge disaster preparations

Pam Tucker has a simple philosophy: Be prepared, not overwhelmed.

Before disaster strikes, Tucker – the director of Columbia County’s Emergency and Operations Division – urges residents to have bottled water, canned food and a first-aid kit, while recommending other items such as solar lighting, a flashlight and portable radio.

“I’m not telling our citizens to become survivalists,” Tucker said. “Because when people get overwhelmed, they won’t do anything. But here’s my advice: Make a checklist, and each time you go to the store, purchase another item off the list. Water is most important, then food and a first-aid kit.”

To promote the importance of preparing before disasters strike, Gov. Nathan Deal has proclaimed September National Prepared­ness Month in Georgia and encourages residents to get fully prepared. According to an annual survey, 80 percent of Georgians report being at least somewhat prepared for a large-scale disaster or emergency, a 27 percent increase since the Ready Georgia campaign launched in 2008.

Ready Georgia promotes three key steps to readiness: be informed about potential threats and protective measures to take in emergency situations; make a plan for communicating and reconnecting with family members if you are separated during an emergency; and build
a kit of emergency supplies that allows you and your family to be self-sufficient for up to 72 hours after a disaster.

Most Georgians have stocked key emergency supplies at home, including a flashlight with extra batteries (85 percent), a first-aid kit (71 percent) and a three-day supply of water and nonperishable food (67 percent). However, only 36 percent of Georgians have arranged a family meeting place or reconnection plan, and just 27 percent have purchased a NOAA weather radio, according to a news release from Ready Georgia.

“What we’re stressing is the essentials to survival,” Tucker said. “If you choose to go overboard, that’s fine, too, but my goal is for 100 percent of our residents to at least have a three-day supply of water per person, canned food, a radio and a first-aid kit. If you have pets, please account for water for them as well.”

Tucker’s disaster preparedness came in handy during the 2014 ice storm. Although Columbia County’s water never shut off, Tucker and her husband had to cope with a power outage.

As the temperature in their home plummeted, Tuck­er turned on her gas fireplace and her husband closed off openings in their den with plastic sheeting.

“This plastic is just another way to stay prepared for emergencies,” Tucker said, pointing to a box. “Our entire house was freezing,
but the den stayed 72 degrees. … The more supplies you have, the more innovative you can be. But please, please do not use candles.”

National Preparedness Month was started after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks to increase awareness and encourage action for emergency preparedness nationwide.

Throughout Sep­tember, the Ready Georgia campaign will join a nationwide coalition of thousands of private, public and nonprofit organizations, each holding local events designed to motivate people to prepare for emergencies.

“It’s great to see that more Georgians are stocking supplies, but it’s also essential to have a plan,” said Georgia Emergency Management Agen­cy Director Jim Butter­worth. “Disasters
don’t wait to strike when you’re at home. They may hit when your family is separated at work or school.”

Columbia County will hold a Prepare & Aware Day on Oct. 10 at its emergency operations center on Ronald Reagan Drive. The public is invited, and six disaster kits will be given away as door prizes.

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Pet Adoptions

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$2.5 million gift boosts pediatric cancer research at GRU

Press On, the foundation founded by families whose children have cancer, announced that major gift Thursday to Georgia Regents University Cancer to help push pediatric cancer research and treatment
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