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Former Columbia County deputy sentenced

A former Columbia County sheriff’s deputy accused of providing accident reports to private attorneys pled guilty Thursday.

Former Staff Sgt. David Ronald Kitchens, 50, was charged in March 2013 with computer theft and violation of oath by a public officer. He pled guilty to the oath violation and the computer theft charge was dismissed at a hearing at the courthouse in Evans.

Superior Court Judge Sheryl B. Jolly sentenced Kitchens to three years probation and a $300 fine under the First Offender Act.

In Feb. 22, a concerned citizen alerted sheriff’s office officials that Kitchens was soliciting business for personal injury attorneys, according to Assistant District Attorney Hank Syms.

An internal investigation revealed that Kitchens was also using the sheriff’s office’s computer system to print accident reports for at least four out-of-town attorneys, which is a violation of sheriff’s office policies. He was fired on Feb. 25, 2013.

The real problem in this case ... is that Mr. Kitchens would print off reports from a sheriff’s office computer system, which you can’t do,” Syms said, adding access allowed a law enforcement officer can’t be used for personal reasons.

Syms also said Kitchens would visit or otherwise talk to people involved in wrecks and refer them to the attorneys.

Kitchens, a 30-year law enforcement veteran, had worked for the sheriff’s office since December 1994. He told authorities that he wasn’t being paid for the referrals, but hoped he’d later be hired to do private investigation work by doing interviews or providing photos.

“Unfortunately, he made a bad judgement decision,” Kitchens’ attorney Ken Nimmons said.

“He made a horrible judgement call to create a side business.”

Syms said the case wasn’t one where incarceration would be an appropriate sentence, but hoped the plea would provide accountability.

“There are no victims in this case. Mr. Kitchens victimized himself,” Nimmons said, referring to Kitchens’ actions as “self-imposed banishment from his profession.”

Categories: Local

Former Columbia County deputy sentenced

A former Columbia County sheriff’s deputy accused of providing accident reports to private attorneys pled guilty Thursday.

Former Staff Sgt. David Ronald Kitchens, 50, was charged in March 2013 with computer theft and violation of oath by a public officer. He pled guilty to the oath violation and the computer theft charge was dismissed at a hearing at the courthouse in Evans.

Superior Court Judge Sheryl B. Jolly sentenced Kitchens to three years probation and a $300 fine under the First Offender Act.

In Feb. 22, a concerned citizen alerted sheriff’s office officials that Kitchens was soliciting business for personal injury attorneys, according to Assistant District Attorney Hank Syms.

An internal investigation revealed that Kitchens was also using the sheriff’s office’s computer system to print accident reports for at least four out-of-town attorneys, which is a violation of sheriff’s office policies. He was fired on Feb. 25, 2013.

The real problem in this case ... is that Mr. Kitchens would print off reports from a sheriff’s office computer system, which you can’t do,” Syms said, adding access allowed a law enforcement officer can’t be used for personal reasons.

Syms also said Kitchens would visit or otherwise talk to people involved in wrecks and refer them to the attorneys.

Kitchens, a 30-year law enforcement veteran, had worked for the sheriff’s office since December 1994. He told authorities that he wasn’t being paid for the referrals, but hoped he’d later be hired to do private investigation work by doing interviews or providing photos.

“Unfortunately, he made a bad judgement decision,” Kitchens’ attorney Ken Nimmons said.

“He made a horrible judgement call to create a side business.”

Syms said the case wasn’t one where incarceration would be an appropriate sentence, but hoped the plea would provide accountability.

“There are no victims in this case. Mr. Kitchens victimized himself,” Nimmons said, referring to Kitchens’ actions as “self-imposed banishment from his profession.”

Categories: Local

Local garden clubs honored at state convention

Several local garden clubs were recognized during the 87th annual convention of the Garden Club of Georgia, Inc., last week in Jekyll Island, Ga., and Betty Davis, immediate past president of the Augusta Council of Garden Clubs, couldn’t be happier.

“It means a lot to receive a state award, as there are 364 clubs in the state that can apply for these awards,” said Davis, who was inducted as director of the Azalea District during the convention. “There are over 60 awards that can be applied for and several sub awards within these.”

Davis said strict guidelines must be adhered to when applying for the awards and applications must be documented with photos and publicity. Among some of the categories in which awards are presented are civic improvement, conservation, flower shows, garden therapy, historic preservation, horticulture, landscape design, roadside improvement, yearbooks, wildflowers and scrapbooks.

Garden club members from the Augusta Council of Garden Clubs attending the convention, in addition to Davis, were Dr. Virginia Allen, Doris Blalock, Peg Glover, Pat Hathaway, Barbara Horner, Ann Leonard, Marilyn McDonnell and Beth Wiseman.

The Augusta Council placed first for Flower Show and Small Standard Flower Show. Mary Byrd of the Pine Needle Garden Club placed first for her poem, The Birds of Winter, and Marilyn McDonnell, a member of the After 6 and Iris Garden clubs, took second place for her poem, My Garden Speaks. The After 6 Garden Club placed first for its Garden for the Challenged, while the Iris Garden Club placed second in the yearbook category.

The Augusta Council also received a certificate of appreciation for its contribution to the projects of The Garden Club of Georgia.

Davis notes that garden clubs participate in a number of local projects. Some are gardening-related, while others are not. The clubs plant and maintain gardens at Riverwalk, the Alzheimer’s Association office, the American Cancer Society office, the Lydia House and the Woodrow Wilson Boyhood home.

Clubs participate in garden therapy at the Georgia War Veterans Home and deliver Christmas stockings and wreaths to Georgia Regional and area nursing homes.

“One of the biggest state projects that local clubs participate in financially is scholarships,” said Davis. “This year, the Garden Clubs of Georgia awarded over $60,000 in scholarships to Georgia college students majoring in horticulture, landscape architecture and design, environment, forestry, ecology, garden therapy or historic preservation fields.”

The Augusta Council has 18 clubs.

Categories: Local

Local garden clubs honored at state convention

Several local garden clubs were recognized during the 87th annual convention of the Garden Club of Georgia, Inc., last week in Jekyll Island, Ga., and Betty Davis, immediate past president of the Augusta Council of Garden Clubs, couldn’t be happier.

“It means a lot to receive a state award, as there are 364 clubs in the state that can apply for these awards,” said Davis, who was inducted as director of the Azalea District during the convention. “There are over 60 awards that can be applied for and several sub awards within these.”

Davis said strict guidelines must be adhered to when applying for the awards and applications must be documented with photos and publicity. Among some of the categories in which awards are presented are civic improvement, conservation, flower shows, garden therapy, historic preservation, horticulture, landscape design, roadside improvement, yearbooks, wildflowers and scrapbooks.

Garden club members from the Augusta Council of Garden Clubs attending the convention, in addition to Davis, were Dr. Virginia Allen, Doris Blalock, Peg Glover, Pat Hathaway, Barbara Horner, Ann Leonard, Marilyn McDonnell and Beth Wiseman.

The Augusta Council placed first for Flower Show and Small Standard Flower Show. Mary Byrd of the Pine Needle Garden Club placed first for her poem, The Birds of Winter, and Marilyn McDonnell, a member of the After 6 and Iris Garden clubs, took second place for her poem, My Garden Speaks. The After 6 Garden Club placed first for its Garden for the Challenged, while the Iris Garden Club placed second in the yearbook category.

The Augusta Council also received a certificate of appreciation for its contribution to the projects of The Garden Club of Georgia.

Davis notes that garden clubs participate in a number of local projects. Some are gardening-related, while others are not. The clubs plant and maintain gardens at Riverwalk, the Alzheimer’s Association office, the American Cancer Society office, the Lydia House and the Woodrow Wilson Boyhood home.

Clubs participate in garden therapy at the Georgia War Veterans Home and deliver Christmas stockings and wreaths to Georgia Regional and area nursing homes.

“One of the biggest state projects that local clubs participate in financially is scholarships,” said Davis. “This year, the Garden Clubs of Georgia awarded over $60,000 in scholarships to Georgia college students majoring in horticulture, landscape architecture and design, environment, forestry, ecology, garden therapy or historic preservation fields.”

The Augusta Council has 18 clubs.

Categories: Local

Woman pleads to stealing from real estate agency

A former real estate agency bookkeeper pled guilty Thursday to stealing from the business.

Melissa Elaine Reeves, 43, pled guilty to nine counts of theft and five counts of identity fraud and a sentencing hearing at the Columbia County courthouse in Evans.

Reeves was charged after she was found to have stolen more than $7,000 from her employer, Leading Edge Real Estate. Assistant District Attorney Pete Lamb said her employers discovered she’d used the company bank account to give herself extra pay and to pay her personal bills including her timeshare association dues and Verizon account.

Superior Court Judge Sheryl B. Jolly sentenced Reeves to 10 years on probation, a $1,000 fine and 30 days of community service under the First Offender Act. Reeves had already paid full restitution.

Reeves is currently operating a cleaning business where she has keys to businesses and homes and has access to personal and business information.

“There’s great concern she has a golden opportunity to reoffend,” Lamb said.

Reeves’ attorney Danny Durham said the stealing was a bad decision in a time of financial struggle for Reeves. Since her arrest and termination from Leading Edge, he said that she’s maintained employment.

Reeves, who apologized for her actions, said she’d never done something like that before.

“She does not steal any more,” Durham said. “She stopped stealing.”

Categories: Local

Woman pleads to stealing from real estate agency

A former real estate agency bookkeeper pled guilty Thursday to stealing from the business.

Melissa Elaine Reeves, 43, pled guilty to nine counts of theft and five counts of identity fraud and a sentencing hearing at the Columbia County courthouse in Evans.

Reeves was charged after she was found to have stolen more than $7,000 from her employer, Leading Edge Real Estate. Assistant District Attorney Pete Lamb said her employers discovered she’d used the company bank account to give herself extra pay and to pay her personal bills including her timeshare association dues and Verizon account.

Superior Court Judge Sheryl B. Jolly sentenced Reeves to 10 years on probation, a $1,000 fine and 30 days of community service under the First Offender Act. Reeves had already paid full restitution.

Reeves is currently operating a cleaning business where she has keys to businesses and homes and has access to personal and business information.

“There’s great concern she has a golden opportunity to reoffend,” Lamb said.

Reeves’ attorney Danny Durham said the stealing was a bad decision in a time of financial struggle for Reeves. Since her arrest and termination from Leading Edge, he said that she’s maintained employment.

Reeves, who apologized for her actions, said she’d never done something like that before.

“She does not steal any more,” Durham said. “She stopped stealing.”

Categories: Local

Police Blotter, April 26, 2015

The following accounts were taken from Columbia County Sheriff’s Office incident reports:

Truck buyer gets surprise

A man who bought a new truck early this year found a surprise hidden in the cab.

The man said he purchased a 2009 Ford F-150 from Fairway Ford in January. His mother was looking inside on Monday.

She saw something wedged under the driver’s seat. The man said his mother found a Smith & Wesson M & P Shield 9mm handgun under the seat.

The man said he called the dealership and was told they’d track down the previous owner of the truck. Authorities checked the weapon, which had a clear history and had never been reported as lost or stolen.

Man harassed about arrest

A man called authorities Wednesday after receiving harassing phone calls about an employee who was arrested.

The 35-year-old man said that one of his employees was arrested in McDuffie County. He began receiving calls and text messages from a woman who said the man needed to help pay his employee’s bond. When he refused and said it was not his responsibility, the woman got irate.

The angry caller told the man that she was going to blow up his business, slash all his tires and put sugar in his gas tank. She then threatened his life.

Even after being told to stop contacting the businessman, the woman continued to send numerous text messages that were vulgar and race-driven.

The man said he called authorities because he was concerned for his safety and that of his employees and business assets.

Man receives mail surprise

An Evans man told deputies Tuesday that he received some unexpected mail.

The man said he received a suspicious envelope and didn’t open it because he didn’t know the person who sent it from a Wadesboro, N.C., address and he wasn’t expecting mail from anyone specific.

A few weeks ago, the man noticed the lock on luggage he’d checked during a trip was broken when he picked it up from the airport.

He worried someone went through the bag, which contained his address and other personal information.

A deputy opened the envelope in front of the man. It contained a small military patch wrapped inside a plain, white piece of paper. The rectangle patch had a sideways black lightning bolt and a black and gray checkerboard.

The deputy researched patches and discovered it represents the 525th Military Intelligence Brigade (Battlefield Surveillance Brigade), also known as the “Lightning Brigade,” out of Fort Bragg, N.C.

Teen scammed out of money

A Martinez teen said Monday that she’d been scammed out of nearly $450 in hopes of gaining a large cash prize.

The 19-year-old said she got a call on April 6 from a man who identified himself as Bob Richmond, who then connected her to another man who said his name was Kenneth Anderson. The teen said she was told that she was to inherit $555,000 and she had to send $395 for shipping and handling. She sent the money, as instructed, to a Jerome James in Kingston, Jamaica.

After the first transaction, the teen said Kenneth Anderson said he needed an additional $250 for a “gold seal” stamp and her money would be reimbursed. She sent that money on April 8 and was sent an e-mail from Kenneth Anderson declaring her a “Mega Millions” winner.

The teen said Monday that she still received calls from Kenneth Anderson, who said he needed $500 for an insurance fee so her “package” could be delivered.

Categories: Local

Police Blotter, April 26, 2015

The following accounts were taken from Columbia County Sheriff’s Office incident reports:

Truck buyer gets surprise

A man who bought a new truck early this year found a surprise hidden in the cab.

The man said he purchased a 2009 Ford F-150 from Fairway Ford in January. His mother was looking inside on Monday.

She saw something wedged under the driver’s seat. The man said his mother found a Smith & Wesson M & P Shield 9mm handgun under the seat.

The man said he called the dealership and was told they’d track down the previous owner of the truck. Authorities checked the weapon, which had a clear history and had never been reported as lost or stolen.

Man harassed about arrest

A man called authorities Wednesday after receiving harassing phone calls about an employee who was arrested.

The 35-year-old man said that one of his employees was arrested in McDuffie County. He began receiving calls and text messages from a woman who said the man needed to help pay his employee’s bond. When he refused and said it was not his responsibility, the woman got irate.

The angry caller told the man that she was going to blow up his business, slash all his tires and put sugar in his gas tank. She then threatened his life.

Even after being told to stop contacting the businessman, the woman continued to send numerous text messages that were vulgar and race-driven.

The man said he called authorities because he was concerned for his safety and that of his employees and business assets.

Man receives mail surprise

An Evans man told deputies Tuesday that he received some unexpected mail.

The man said he received a suspicious envelope and didn’t open it because he didn’t know the person who sent it from a Wadesboro, N.C., address and he wasn’t expecting mail from anyone specific.

A few weeks ago, the man noticed the lock on luggage he’d checked during a trip was broken when he picked it up from the airport.

He worried someone went through the bag, which contained his address and other personal information.

A deputy opened the envelope in front of the man. It contained a small military patch wrapped inside a plain, white piece of paper. The rectangle patch had a sideways black lightning bolt and a black and gray checkerboard.

The deputy researched patches and discovered it represents the 525th Military Intelligence Brigade (Battlefield Surveillance Brigade), also known as the “Lightning Brigade,” out of Fort Bragg, N.C.

Teen scammed out of money

A Martinez teen said Monday that she’d been scammed out of nearly $450 in hopes of gaining a large cash prize.

The 19-year-old said she got a call on April 6 from a man who identified himself as Bob Richmond, who then connected her to another man who said his name was Kenneth Anderson. The teen said she was told that she was to inherit $555,000 and she had to send $395 for shipping and handling. She sent the money, as instructed, to a Jerome James in Kingston, Jamaica.

After the first transaction, the teen said Kenneth Anderson said he needed an additional $250 for a “gold seal” stamp and her money would be reimbursed. She sent that money on April 8 and was sent an e-mail from Kenneth Anderson declaring her a “Mega Millions” winner.

The teen said Monday that she still received calls from Kenneth Anderson, who said he needed $500 for an insurance fee so her “package” could be delivered.

Categories: Local

Harlem's King of the Grill BBQ Competition Saturday

Harlem is offering a day of music, fun and barbecue with its inaugural King of the Grill BBQ Competition on Saturday.

The event gives backyard barbecuers a chance to hone their skills before the annual Banjo-B-Que barbecue competition in late May.

“This is the warm-up,” said event organizer Stacie Hart, the city’s Community Services and Events coordinator. “It really is.”

Hart said 12 teams including three professional teams have registered to compete and the winner gets an entry into the Banjo-B-Que’s Backyard division. The winner also gets four tickets to attend the event. The second place finisher gets a $200 prize and the third-place barbecuer gets $100.

Teams will compete in Pork Ribs, Pork Loin and Pork categories. Patrons can buy tickets to sample and vote for the People’s Choice Award and a $100 prize.

But there will be more than barbecue from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Harlem City Park.

“There will be something for everyone,” Hart said. “There truly will be.”

Motorcycles and cars and trucks will be on display in the car and bike show.

For a $20 entry fee, owners of the first 50 cars and 40 bikes can show off their vehicles.

Participants will compete for the top spots and cash prizes in several categories – Best Paint, Best in Show, first, second and third place.

“The trophies are like no other that they have ever received,” Hart said. “They are off-the-chain nice.”

Arts and crafts vendors, food and refreshment vendors and yard sale vendors will be selling their wares.

Live entertainment begins at noon.

“It’s a free event. It’s free,” Hart said. “It’s going to be super. It’s going to be a great great day.”

Raffles going on throughout the day offer lots of prizes including a dream driving experience at Atlanta Motor Speedway.

Hart said a golf car shuttle will be available from several parking areas – Harlem United Methodist Church, Starling-Evans Funeral Home and the former IGA building parking lot.

All proceeds from the event go toward restoration of the Columbia Theatre.

For more information or an application, contact Hart at (706) 556-3448 ext. 2008 or shart@harlemga.org.

Categories: Local

Harlem's King of the Grill BBQ Competition Saturday

Harlem is offering a day of music, fun and barbecue with its inaugural King of the Grill BBQ Competition on Saturday.

The event gives backyard barbecuers a chance to hone their skills before the annual Banjo-B-Que barbecue competition in late May.

“This is the warm-up,” said event organizer Stacie Hart, the city’s Community Services and Events coordinator. “It really is.”

Hart said 12 teams including three professional teams have registered to compete and the winner gets an entry into the Banjo-B-Que’s Backyard division. The winner also gets four tickets to attend the event. The second place finisher gets a $200 prize and the third-place barbecuer gets $100.

Teams will compete in Pork Ribs, Pork Loin and Pork categories. Patrons can buy tickets to sample and vote for the People’s Choice Award and a $100 prize.

But there will be more than barbecue from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Harlem City Park.

“There will be something for everyone,” Hart said. “There truly will be.”

Motorcycles and cars and trucks will be on display in the car and bike show.

For a $20 entry fee, owners of the first 50 cars and 40 bikes can show off their vehicles.

Participants will compete for the top spots and cash prizes in several categories – Best Paint, Best in Show, first, second and third place.

“The trophies are like no other that they have ever received,” Hart said. “They are off-the-chain nice.”

Arts and crafts vendors, food and refreshment vendors and yard sale vendors will be selling their wares.

Live entertainment begins at noon.

“It’s a free event. It’s free,” Hart said. “It’s going to be super. It’s going to be a great great day.”

Raffles going on throughout the day offer lots of prizes including a dream driving experience at Atlanta Motor Speedway.

Hart said a golf car shuttle will be available from several parking areas – Harlem United Methodist Church, Starling-Evans Funeral Home and the former IGA building parking lot.

All proceeds from the event go toward restoration of the Columbia Theatre.

For more information or an application, contact Hart at (706) 556-3448 ext. 2008 or shart@harlemga.org.

Categories: Local

Growth meetings under way

If the past 20 years can be used as any kind of measuring stick, the Columbia County of 2035 will be very different place than what we know now.

It’s a reality that county planning officials are preparing for right now.

“Columbia County is a different place than it was 10, 15 or 20 years ago,” said county Planning Director Andrew Strickland, addressing a crowd gathered Monday for the first of four “visioning sessions” seeking public input for a new 20-year comprehensive development plan.

County officials along with a group of planning consultants held meetings on Monday and Thursday to gather feedback for “Vision 2035,” as the plan has been named. Members of the public were invited to take a look at the county’s current condition and give their ideas about topics such as transportation, recreation and commercial development for the next two decades.

Visioning sessions

“Really we are looking for a vision,” Strickland said to about 40 people who had turned out for the session at Patriot’s Park. “We want your vision of how you see Columbia County should develop over the next 20 years. You live in this community; you work in this community. How do you want to see Columbia County develop?”

Over the next 90 minutes, participants peered at county maps, made notations about issues and discussed ideas about how growth should be handled.

The forecast for the next 20 years is more rapid growth, said Paige Hatley, a member of the team of consultants assisting the county with the Vision 2035 plan.

Hatley said that by 2035 the county’s current population of about 139,000 will mushroom to about 210,000, according to forecasting models. At the same time, she said Richmond County’s population would increase to about 213,000 and Aiken County would growth to about 215,000.

Hatley said the county will experience and even bigger expansion in jobs, growing from about 51,000 to more than 77,000 jobs, about a 50 percent change.

The county has already been it by some growing pains. Much of the discussion around the tables Monday night focused on traffic and transportation issues.

Nestor Garcia, of Evans, said he wanted to see a solution proposed for the daily traffic jams that plague Grovetown on mornings and afternoons when thousands travel to and from Fort Gordon for work.

He said the county had done a poor job anticipating the growth on post and the traffic consequences that followed.

“Something has to be done,” he said.

Others were just as concerned about preserving some the county’s wild places and natural beauty of undeveloped areas.

Melissa Llinas was part of one group that wanted to ensure that sensitive places, such as Heggies Rock were protected from development.

Llinas siad she drive on Old Washington Road almost every day, which is another area she hopes won’t change any time soon.

“I just love to see the honeysuckles and all the old trees,” she said. “It’s beautiful.”

Consultant Inge Kennedy said her team was intent on taking in all this information, along with feedback from written and telephone surveys to come up with a draft plan by August. I final plan to guide future county development decisions should be ready by January.

Kennedy told those in attendance that time moves faster that you think, when it comes to planning issues.

“Now is the time to get ready for it,” Kennedy said. “You can’t wait until 2030 to get ready for 2035, so that’s why we are here now.”

The county has two more sessions planned for this week: on Monday at the County Exhibition Center and on Thursday at Savannah Rapids Pavilion. Meetings are open to the public and begin at 6 p.m.

Categories: Local

Growth meetings under way

If the past 20 years can be used as any kind of measuring stick, the Columbia County of 2035 will be very different place than what we know now.

It’s a reality that county planning officials are preparing for right now.

“Columbia County is a different place than it was 10, 15 or 20 years ago,” said county Planning Director Andrew Strickland, addressing a crowd gathered Monday for the first of four “visioning sessions” seeking public input for a new 20-year comprehensive development plan.

County officials along with a group of planning consultants held meetings on Monday and Thursday to gather feedback for “Vision 2035,” as the plan has been named. Members of the public were invited to take a look at the county’s current condition and give their ideas about topics such as transportation, recreation and commercial development for the next two decades.

Visioning sessions

“Really we are looking for a vision,” Strickland said to about 40 people who had turned out for the session at Patriot’s Park. “We want your vision of how you see Columbia County should develop over the next 20 years. You live in this community; you work in this community. How do you want to see Columbia County develop?”

Over the next 90 minutes, participants peered at county maps, made notations about issues and discussed ideas about how growth should be handled.

The forecast for the next 20 years is more rapid growth, said Paige Hatley, a member of the team of consultants assisting the county with the Vision 2035 plan.

Hatley said that by 2035 the county’s current population of about 139,000 will mushroom to about 210,000, according to forecasting models. At the same time, she said Richmond County’s population would increase to about 213,000 and Aiken County would growth to about 215,000.

Hatley said the county will experience and even bigger expansion in jobs, growing from about 51,000 to more than 77,000 jobs, about a 50 percent change.

The county has already been it by some growing pains. Much of the discussion around the tables Monday night focused on traffic and transportation issues.

Nestor Garcia, of Evans, said he wanted to see a solution proposed for the daily traffic jams that plague Grovetown on mornings and afternoons when thousands travel to and from Fort Gordon for work.

He said the county had done a poor job anticipating the growth on post and the traffic consequences that followed.

“Something has to be done,” he said.

Others were just as concerned about preserving some the county’s wild places and natural beauty of undeveloped areas.

Melissa Llinas was part of one group that wanted to ensure that sensitive places, such as Heggies Rock were protected from development.

Llinas siad she drive on Old Washington Road almost every day, which is another area she hopes won’t change any time soon.

“I just love to see the honeysuckles and all the old trees,” she said. “It’s beautiful.”

Consultant Inge Kennedy said her team was intent on taking in all this information, along with feedback from written and telephone surveys to come up with a draft plan by August. I final plan to guide future county development decisions should be ready by January.

Kennedy told those in attendance that time moves faster that you think, when it comes to planning issues.

“Now is the time to get ready for it,” Kennedy said. “You can’t wait until 2030 to get ready for 2035, so that’s why we are here now.”

The county has two more sessions planned for this week: on Monday at the County Exhibition Center and on Thursday at Savannah Rapids Pavilion. Meetings are open to the public and begin at 6 p.m.

Categories: Local

Property Transfers, April 26, 2015

Ivey Residential LLC to Latonya D. Smalls and John Eric Smalls, 2547 Ravenna Lane, $417,000.

Adrian F. Bell to Philippe Erramuzpe, parcel ID 063181, $100,000.

Joseph M. Barrs to Anthony S. Micklon, 4167 Saddle Horn Drive, $165,500.

Stephen Wayne Williford to Sona K. Limon, 3741 Washington Road, $450,000.

Karen R. Rhodes to Jennifer B. Elinow, 4031 Danielle Drive, $110,000.

Winchester Homes of GA Inc. to Michael Allen Shaw and Bianca Shaw, 2438 Newbury Ave., $200,000.

Winchester Homes of GA Inc. to Lesley A. Asendorf, 1719 Edenburg Way, $229,950.

RT Bailey Construction Co. Inc. to John D’Souza and Promila D’Souza, 307 N. Sandhills Lane, $285,000.

Melony S. Carter to David P. Deines, 358 Kings Bridge Road, $116,400.

Wilson Parker Homes of Hidden Creek Inc. to Demetrius Maurice Bell, 5505 Dualwood Drive, $207,490.

Winchester Homes of HA Inc. to Martha Jean Moreo, 2445 Newbury Ave., $183,188.

Richard J. Bendorf to Andrew Dean Brown and Brittany Dawn Brown, 1461 Lakeview Drive, $227,000.

Wilson Parker Homes Retreat at Baker Place Inc. to John E. Liebaly, 729 Burch Creek Drive, $352,500.

Winchester Homes of GA Inc. to Timothy R. Middleton and Susan Ann Middleton, 749 Southwick Ave., $251,525.

JJ & Z Builders LLC to Nathaniel N. Flowers and Elizabeth Ornelas-Flowers, 8626 Crenshaw Drive, $291,000.

Grace L. Hollingsworth to Swan M. Dominguez, 219 Sarah Creek Court, $137,900.

Oconee Capital Investments LLC to Shijin Mei, 216 Ryan Lane, $232,000.

Categories: Local

Property Transfers, April 26, 2015

Ivey Residential LLC to Latonya D. Smalls and John Eric Smalls, 2547 Ravenna Lane, $417,000.

Adrian F. Bell to Philippe Erramuzpe, parcel ID 063181, $100,000.

Joseph M. Barrs to Anthony S. Micklon, 4167 Saddle Horn Drive, $165,500.

Stephen Wayne Williford to Sona K. Limon, 3741 Washington Road, $450,000.

Karen R. Rhodes to Jennifer B. Elinow, 4031 Danielle Drive, $110,000.

Winchester Homes of GA Inc. to Michael Allen Shaw and Bianca Shaw, 2438 Newbury Ave., $200,000.

Winchester Homes of GA Inc. to Lesley A. Asendorf, 1719 Edenburg Way, $229,950.

RT Bailey Construction Co. Inc. to John D’Souza and Promila D’Souza, 307 N. Sandhills Lane, $285,000.

Melony S. Carter to David P. Deines, 358 Kings Bridge Road, $116,400.

Wilson Parker Homes of Hidden Creek Inc. to Demetrius Maurice Bell, 5505 Dualwood Drive, $207,490.

Winchester Homes of HA Inc. to Martha Jean Moreo, 2445 Newbury Ave., $183,188.

Richard J. Bendorf to Andrew Dean Brown and Brittany Dawn Brown, 1461 Lakeview Drive, $227,000.

Wilson Parker Homes Retreat at Baker Place Inc. to John E. Liebaly, 729 Burch Creek Drive, $352,500.

Winchester Homes of GA Inc. to Timothy R. Middleton and Susan Ann Middleton, 749 Southwick Ave., $251,525.

JJ & Z Builders LLC to Nathaniel N. Flowers and Elizabeth Ornelas-Flowers, 8626 Crenshaw Drive, $291,000.

Grace L. Hollingsworth to Swan M. Dominguez, 219 Sarah Creek Court, $137,900.

Oconee Capital Investments LLC to Shijin Mei, 216 Ryan Lane, $232,000.

Categories: Local

Marriage Licenses, April 26, 2015

Elan Andrew Christian and Ekaydria Tanzania Campbell applied for a marriage license on March 26, 2015, and were married April 12, 2015, in Martinez.

Charles Hillis Thomas and Shannon Lanier Lemay applied for a marriage license on April 6, 2015, and were married April 11, 2015, in Tybee Island, Ga.

Johnathon Michael Rabun and Nicole Catherine Yates applied for a marriage license on April 2, 2015, and were married April 10, 2015, in Harlem.

Ronald Eric Nappier and Karen Emil Chacon Hernandez applied for a marriage license on April 9, 2015, and were married April 10, 2015, in Evans.

Gerald Macellis Tanksley and Annisha Lashell Vaughns applied for a marriage license on Aug. 20, 2014, and were married April 4, 2015, in Augusta.

Caleb Tyrel Sawyer and Kirston Elizabeth Biernot applied for a marriage license on Feb. 13, 2015, and were married March 28, 2015, in Appling.

Brandon Andrew Wall and Karen Elizabeth Rocker applied for a marriage license on March 20, 2015, and were married April 11, 2015, in Hephzibah.

Edgar Allen Simmons Jr. and Tammy Michelle Floyd applied for a marriage license on April 6, 2015, and were married April 14, 2015, in Evans.

Samuel Adam Bussey Jr. and Cheryl Ann Del Mundo applied for a marriage license on March 19, 2015, and were married April 4, 2015, in Jekyll Island, Ga.

Dewet Ervin Wade Jr. and Diedre Jean Riedel applied for a marriage license on March 27, 2015, and were married April 18, 2015, in Martinez.

Adam David Cincar and Kayce Sala Teel applied for a marriage license on April 2, 2015, and were married April 11, 2015, on St. Simons Island, Ga.

Categories: Local

Marriage Licenses, April 26, 2015

Elan Andrew Christian and Ekaydria Tanzania Campbell applied for a marriage license on March 26, 2015, and were married April 12, 2015, in Martinez.

Charles Hillis Thomas and Shannon Lanier Lemay applied for a marriage license on April 6, 2015, and were married April 11, 2015, in Tybee Island, Ga.

Johnathon Michael Rabun and Nicole Catherine Yates applied for a marriage license on April 2, 2015, and were married April 10, 2015, in Harlem.

Ronald Eric Nappier and Karen Emil Chacon Hernandez applied for a marriage license on April 9, 2015, and were married April 10, 2015, in Evans.

Gerald Macellis Tanksley and Annisha Lashell Vaughns applied for a marriage license on Aug. 20, 2014, and were married April 4, 2015, in Augusta.

Caleb Tyrel Sawyer and Kirston Elizabeth Biernot applied for a marriage license on Feb. 13, 2015, and were married March 28, 2015, in Appling.

Brandon Andrew Wall and Karen Elizabeth Rocker applied for a marriage license on March 20, 2015, and were married April 11, 2015, in Hephzibah.

Edgar Allen Simmons Jr. and Tammy Michelle Floyd applied for a marriage license on April 6, 2015, and were married April 14, 2015, in Evans.

Samuel Adam Bussey Jr. and Cheryl Ann Del Mundo applied for a marriage license on March 19, 2015, and were married April 4, 2015, in Jekyll Island, Ga.

Dewet Ervin Wade Jr. and Diedre Jean Riedel applied for a marriage license on March 27, 2015, and were married April 18, 2015, in Martinez.

Adam David Cincar and Kayce Sala Teel applied for a marriage license on April 2, 2015, and were married April 11, 2015, on St. Simons Island, Ga.

Categories: Local

Divorces, April 26, 2015

Richard L. Price and Christine A. Price, April 1, 2015.

Praharsha Ravindranatha Menon and Sachindev Janardhan, April 14, 2015.

Scott Cameron Sterling and Deanna Meadows Sterling, April 1, 2015.

James M. Jarrett and Laura T. Jarrett, March 31, 2015.

Pamela Acito Hardin and Charles Ralph Hardin, April 6, 2015.

Jeffery L. Downs and Felicia K. Downs, April 20, 2015.

Emily K. King and Christopher D. Eng, Feb. 4, 2015.

Marcy Lynn Relken Taylor and Henry Richard Taylor, April 20, 2015.

Eric Gill and Melinda Clark-Gill, April 8, 2015.

Heather Danette Coffman and Dustin Shea Coffman, April 7, 2015.

Maria Wright and Richard Wright, April 20, 2015.

Brandon Douglas Shannon and Christie Sanderson Shannon, April 8, 2015.

Categories: Local

Divorces, April 26, 2015

Richard L. Price and Christine A. Price, April 1, 2015.

Praharsha Ravindranatha Menon and Sachindev Janardhan, April 14, 2015.

Scott Cameron Sterling and Deanna Meadows Sterling, April 1, 2015.

James M. Jarrett and Laura T. Jarrett, March 31, 2015.

Pamela Acito Hardin and Charles Ralph Hardin, April 6, 2015.

Jeffery L. Downs and Felicia K. Downs, April 20, 2015.

Emily K. King and Christopher D. Eng, Feb. 4, 2015.

Marcy Lynn Relken Taylor and Henry Richard Taylor, April 20, 2015.

Eric Gill and Melinda Clark-Gill, April 8, 2015.

Heather Danette Coffman and Dustin Shea Coffman, April 7, 2015.

Maria Wright and Richard Wright, April 20, 2015.

Brandon Douglas Shannon and Christie Sanderson Shannon, April 8, 2015.

Categories: Local

Powerball - 04/25/2015

Georgia Lottery - 5 hours 59 min ago
21-33-35-38-45 Powerball: 12 Power Play: 2X Estimated Jackpot: $60 Million
Categories: Local

Fantasy 5 - 04/25/2015

Georgia Lottery - 5 hours 59 min ago
10-11-13-16-36 Estimated Jackpot: $120,000
Categories: Local
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