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Jumbo Bucks Lotto - 08/31/2015

Georgia Lottery - 8 hours 33 min ago
08-11-16-29-39-42 Estimated Jackpot: $1,400,000
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Fantasy 5 - 08/31/2015

Georgia Lottery - 8 hours 33 min ago
11-13-22-28-29 Estimated Jackpot: $100,000
Categories: Local

All or Nothing Morning - 08/31/2015

Georgia Lottery - 8 hours 33 min ago
03-04-05-06-08-09-10-12-16-17-18-23
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Cash 3 Midday - 08/31/2015

Georgia Lottery - 8 hours 33 min ago
291
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Cash 4 Midday - 08/31/2015

Georgia Lottery - 8 hours 33 min ago
7652
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Georgia FIVE Midday - 08/31/2015

Georgia Lottery - 8 hours 33 min ago
31479
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Educated Guesses 2015: A season on the brink

ScottMichaux.com - Mon, 8/31/2015 12:41 PM
By Scott Michaux

 

I'd really rather not talk about last season. It devolved into a predicting disaster after pretty much nailing everything the first half of the season. Somewhere along the way, the SEC West fell apart and the SEC East salavaged the conferences reputation in otherwise meaningless bowl games.

 

And how the hell did Ohio State become invincible after easily the sorriest loss (at home to a woeful Virginia Tech team that wrestled Wake Forest to a scoreless regulation) of any championship caliber program?

 

Well, it's a new year and a chance at redemption. Starting now with Week 1's semi-educated guesses:

 

Alcorn State @ Georgia Tech: A new crop of rushing stars will be establish its mark with triple option. YELLOW JACKETS 42, Braves 14.

 

North Carolina vs. South Carolina: This game could go either way, but the ol' ball coach has never lost to UNC. GAMECOCKS 38, Tar Heels 35.

 

Louisiana-Monroe @ Georgia: A far cry from some recent marquee lid-lifters UGA are accostomed to seeing. BULLDOGS 44, Warhawks 3.

 

Wofford @ Clemson: At least the Terriers don't have to commute too far for this season-opening beatdown. TIGERS 52, Terriers 7.

 

Georgia Southern @ West Virginia: The sofa burners should feel uncomfortable about this home opener. MOUNTAINEERS 42, Eagles 35.

 

Wisconsin vs. Alabama: Good way for SEC to repair the damage from its high-end postseason breakdowns. CRIMSON TIDE 28, Badgers 17.

 

Louisville vs. Auburn: The Georgia Dome will feel like a home game to launch Auburn. TIGERS 31, Cardinals 17.

 

Ohio State @ Virginia Tech: Expect Urban Meyer's stars to vindicate last season's only blemish. BUCKEYES 38, Gobblers 13.

 

Arizona State vs. Texas A&M: Aggies are favored? Am I missing something? SUN DEVILS 35, Aggies 24.

 

TCU @ Minnesota: TCU needs to ace what amounts to the only non-conference test it faces. HORNED FROGS 42, Gophers 28.

 

Texas @ Notre Dame: Chance for new Irish QB Malik Zaire to back up the hype. FIGHTING IRISH 35, Longhorns 24.

 

LAST WEEK: 0-1

Winners: none.

Losers: Oregon.

 

Year-to-date record: 0-0 (---)

 

2014 record: 116-61 (.655)

 

2013 record: 126-50 (.716)

 

2012 record: 117-48 (.709)

 

2011 record: 115-51 (.693)

 

2010 record: 97-49 (.664)

 

2015 PRESEASON MICHAUX POLL

 

Rank (Prev) Team (2014 Rec) - Comment

1. (1) Ohio State (14-1) - It's Buckeyes to lose this time.

2. (20) Auburn (8-5) - Will Muschamp should upgrade defense.

3. (4) TCU (12-1) - Ready to restore the Big 12's reputation.

4. (10) Clemson (10-3) - Few are giving Tigers a real chance. so I will.

5. (17) UCLA (10-3) - With USC in coaching disarray, Bruins class of Pac-12.

6. (3) Alabama (12-2) - Basing this purely on reputation.

7. (5) Michigan State (11-2) - The only real conference threat to OSU.

8. (9) Georgia (10-3) - QB and tough SEC West draw raise doubts.

9. (6) Florida State (13-1) - Everett Golson is no Jameis Winston.

10. (8) Baylor (11-2) - Not quite as sold on Bears as some are.

11. (7) Georgia Tech (11-3) - Tough schedule will mitigate potential.

12. (2) Oregon (13-2) - Missing Marcus Mariotta will show at Michigan State.

13. (11) Boise State (12-2) - Undefeated season might derail playoffs.

14. (13) Arizona State (10-3) - Pac-12 may be too deep for its own good.

15. (24) Southern Cal (9-4) - Cody Kessler will offset his coach's mistakes

16. (NR) LSU (8-5) - Will regain its place in SEC West heirarchy.

17. (21) Ole Miss (9-4) - Defense makes them formidible.

18. (12) Arizona (10-4) - Tough sledding in SEC West of the West.

19. (14) Wisconsin (11-3) - New coach needs to prove himself.

20. (NR) Tennessee (7-6) - My pick to eke out SEC East crown.

21. (NR) Notre Dame (8-5) - Again, not as sold as everyone else is.

22. (NR) Oklahoma (8-5) - Clemson embarrassed them in bowl.

23. (15) Mississippi State (10-3) - Based entirely on Dak Prescott.

24. (25) Georgia Southern (9-3) - Better than many Power 5 programs.

25. (NR) Virginia Tech (7-6) - Will win Coastal by weak-schedule default.

 

Categories: Local

Fantasy 5 - 08/30/2015

Georgia Lottery - Mon, 8/31/2015 12:00 AM
02-04-11-13-30 Estimated Jackpot: $120,000
Categories: Local

Broadband companies slow River Watch Parkway work

A delay in relocating utilities, particularly telecommunications lines by Internet providers Com­cast and WOW!, has caused construction of a $40.3 million expansion of River Watch Parkway in Columbia County to fall six months behind schedule, officials said on Aug. 24.

Tim Magill, the project manager for E.R. Snell, a road and bridges contractor based in the Atlanta area, said during a two-hour community forum at Mosaic United Methodist Church in Evans that his crews have cleared all the land they need to begin the three-mile extension. The main obstacle to starting work on grading the highway, Magill said, is Comcast and WOW! relocating broadband cables.

He said that unlike gas, power and water companies in the area, the two Internet providers have at least three more weeks to go, making the project’s expected completion date of April 30, 2017, a “tall order.”

“We have done all we can, but utilities are the primary factor not working in our favor right now,” Magill said to a group of 40 residents who attended the meeting to receive updates on the project.

Many of the residents found the possibility of a delay to be unsettling, particularly because the three-year project has already caused stormwater to damage residential sewer lines because of faulty silt fences.

George Hoyt, who lives on Old Petersburg Road, said that because of the number of times that crews have caused breaks in his water line, increased sewer costs raised his county utility bill last month from $70 to $280.

Hoyt said the county only adjusted his bill by $80, an inconvenience he said he does not want any longer than necessary.

Columbia County Comm­is­sio­ner Doug Duncan said he would look into resolving excess water charges.

Magill said E.R. Snell has no control over local utility companies, which did not attend the meeting, and that the delays will not cost taxpayers because DOT has already set the contract price.

Online records show the River Watch expansion, funded by the state’s Transportation In­vestment Act, is 33 percent complete and invoiced $7.4 million in sales tax funds to date.

Lori Greenhill, a Martinez resident who has launched Ri­ver Watch Community Advo­cates, an awareness effort to support homeowners affected by the expansion, encourages local residents to get involved.

“If any of you are Comcast or WOW! customers, call them,” she said. “Tell them they are holding up progress.”

The project is designed to streamline traffic from downtown Augusta to Columbia County’s Towne Center area by transforming Old Evans and Petersburg roads into a four-lane highway with bike lanes, sidewalks and a bridge over railroad lines.

Categories: Local

Broadband companies slow River Watch Parkway work

A delay in relocating utilities, particularly telecommunications lines by Internet providers Com­cast and WOW!, has caused construction of a $40.3 million expansion of River Watch Parkway in Columbia County to fall six months behind schedule, officials said on Aug. 24.

Tim Magill, the project manager for E.R. Snell, a road and bridges contractor based in the Atlanta area, said during a two-hour community forum at Mosaic United Methodist Church in Evans that his crews have cleared all the land they need to begin the three-mile extension. The main obstacle to starting work on grading the highway, Magill said, is Comcast and WOW! relocating broadband cables.

He said that unlike gas, power and water companies in the area, the two Internet providers have at least three more weeks to go, making the project’s expected completion date of April 30, 2017, a “tall order.”

“We have done all we can, but utilities are the primary factor not working in our favor right now,” Magill said to a group of 40 residents who attended the meeting to receive updates on the project.

Many of the residents found the possibility of a delay to be unsettling, particularly because the three-year project has already caused stormwater to damage residential sewer lines because of faulty silt fences.

George Hoyt, who lives on Old Petersburg Road, said that because of the number of times that crews have caused breaks in his water line, increased sewer costs raised his county utility bill last month from $70 to $280.

Hoyt said the county only adjusted his bill by $80, an inconvenience he said he does not want any longer than necessary.

Columbia County Comm­is­sio­ner Doug Duncan said he would look into resolving excess water charges.

Magill said E.R. Snell has no control over local utility companies, which did not attend the meeting, and that the delays will not cost taxpayers because DOT has already set the contract price.

Online records show the River Watch expansion, funded by the state’s Transportation In­vestment Act, is 33 percent complete and invoiced $7.4 million in sales tax funds to date.

Lori Greenhill, a Martinez resident who has launched Ri­ver Watch Community Advo­cates, an awareness effort to support homeowners affected by the expansion, encourages local residents to get involved.

“If any of you are Comcast or WOW! customers, call them,” she said. “Tell them they are holding up progress.”

The project is designed to streamline traffic from downtown Augusta to Columbia County’s Towne Center area by transforming Old Evans and Petersburg roads into a four-lane highway with bike lanes, sidewalks and a bridge over railroad lines.

Categories: Local

More commercial development slated for Columbia County

William Few Parkway could see more commercial development in the near future.

A rezoning request for a grocery-anchored center with restaurant and retail space at the corner of William Few Parkway and Columbia Road in Evans is going before Columbia County planning commissioners Sept. 3. The wooded 21-acre parcel is adjacent to Patriots Park.

The preliminary zoning plan shows a 60,000-square-foot grocer anchoring the center, which would also include more than 50,000 square feet of retail space and five out-parcels fronting the intersection.

“That is a footprint, which we’ll probably use,” said Oliver Owens, who is representing the out-of-town property owners at the rezoning hearing. Owens, who has a background in construction lending, said he and the owners will likely work with local developers to put together the project.

Owens said it was too early to give names of prospective tenants but that the center would be “upscale” and target a national chain grocery store and a mix of retail and restaurants, one or two of which would be “first class.”

Owens said they would like to start marketing the property after the first of the year. First, he said, the property must be rezoned from residential agricultural to general commercial.

The final rezoning decision will come from the county commission later in September.

Owens said the surrounding area’s growth makes commercial development there feasible.

“It’s got a lot of potential in the future,” he said. “Any time your big box people come in they go by rooftops. You have to have enough rooftops in the area to justify it.”

The same property owners have about 300 acres on the opposite side of William Few Parkway, with long-range plans of developing the land into “upscale housing,” Owens said.

Further down William Few Parkway, at the Lewiston Road intersection near Grovetown, grading started this month on a 36-acre commercial site that will include the area’s first 114,000-square-foot Kroger Marketplace, 10,000 additional square feet of shop space and 12 retail out-parcels. Kroger is expected to open there in the summer of 2016.

Categories: Local

More commercial development slated for Columbia County

William Few Parkway could see more commercial development in the near future.

A rezoning request for a grocery-anchored center with restaurant and retail space at the corner of William Few Parkway and Columbia Road in Evans is going before Columbia County planning commissioners Sept. 3. The wooded 21-acre parcel is adjacent to Patriots Park.

The preliminary zoning plan shows a 60,000-square-foot grocer anchoring the center, which would also include more than 50,000 square feet of retail space and five out-parcels fronting the intersection.

“That is a footprint, which we’ll probably use,” said Oliver Owens, who is representing the out-of-town property owners at the rezoning hearing. Owens, who has a background in construction lending, said he and the owners will likely work with local developers to put together the project.

Owens said it was too early to give names of prospective tenants but that the center would be “upscale” and target a national chain grocery store and a mix of retail and restaurants, one or two of which would be “first class.”

Owens said they would like to start marketing the property after the first of the year. First, he said, the property must be rezoned from residential agricultural to general commercial.

The final rezoning decision will come from the county commission later in September.

Owens said the surrounding area’s growth makes commercial development there feasible.

“It’s got a lot of potential in the future,” he said. “Any time your big box people come in they go by rooftops. You have to have enough rooftops in the area to justify it.”

The same property owners have about 300 acres on the opposite side of William Few Parkway, with long-range plans of developing the land into “upscale housing,” Owens said.

Further down William Few Parkway, at the Lewiston Road intersection near Grovetown, grading started this month on a 36-acre commercial site that will include the area’s first 114,000-square-foot Kroger Marketplace, 10,000 additional square feet of shop space and 12 retail out-parcels. Kroger is expected to open there in the summer of 2016.

Categories: Local

Archery tournament returning to Wildwood Park

A large archery tournament is returning to Columbia County next year.

Columbia County officials are expected Tuesday to approve a $5,000 host fee to bring back an Archery Shooters Association back to Wildwood Park next spring.

“We’re really looking forward to coming back,” said Michael Tyrell, president of the international archery organization.

Tyrell said the Georgia Pro/Am 3-D archery tournament was held at the Columbia County park in 2006 and 2007 before moving to Fort Gordon through 2012. He expects the tournament to draw about 1,600 shooters.

“They travel from everywhere,” Tyrell said, adding that archers from England, Australia, Canada and the continental United States typically participate in the series of tournaments held around the country all year.

The tournament is slated for April 28 through May 1 at the park on Thurmond Lake in Appling.

Randy DuTeau, executive director of the Columbia County Convention and Visitors Bureau, has worked with Tyrell and the organization several times in the past.

He expects the tournament to further showcase Wildwood Park and all that can be done there as well as have a significant economic effect for the county.

“It’s a really cool tournament,” DuTeau said. “It’s huge.”

In addition, county officials have agreed to make some changes to the park to make it more convenient for tournament participants as well as other park guests.

A multi-use trail will be cut from the main parking areas near the boat ramps to the campground and the Corps of Engineers agreed to allow the county to clear cut some forested area of the
tournament.

“The facility is going to be a lot more accommodating for the numbers that it has been in the past,” DuTeau said. “It’s really nice to see the park getting utilized that way.”

Columbia County Deputy Administrator Glenn Kennedy said considering the expected participants and estimated economic effect for the county, the changes will be well worth the effort.

The contract is a multi-year contract that can be canceled by the county or the ASA within 30 days after the first event next spring. But Tyrell said he hopes the move back into Columbia County is a long one.

And county Administrator Scott Johnson said happy to see the event return.

“We’re glad to have them back.”

Categories: Local

Archery tournament returning to Wildwood Park

A large archery tournament is returning to Columbia County next year.

Columbia County officials are expected Tuesday to approve a $5,000 host fee to bring back an Archery Shooters Association back to Wildwood Park next spring.

“We’re really looking forward to coming back,” said Michael Tyrell, president of the international archery organization.

Tyrell said the Georgia Pro/Am 3-D archery tournament was held at the Columbia County park in 2006 and 2007 before moving to Fort Gordon through 2012. He expects the tournament to draw about 1,600 shooters.

“They travel from everywhere,” Tyrell said, adding that archers from England, Australia, Canada and the continental United States typically participate in the series of tournaments held around the country all year.

The tournament is slated for April 28 through May 1 at the park on Thurmond Lake in Appling.

Randy DuTeau, executive director of the Columbia County Convention and Visitors Bureau, has worked with Tyrell and the organization several times in the past.

He expects the tournament to further showcase Wildwood Park and all that can be done there as well as have a significant economic effect for the county.

“It’s a really cool tournament,” DuTeau said. “It’s huge.”

In addition, county officials have agreed to make some changes to the park to make it more convenient for tournament participants as well as other park guests.

A multi-use trail will be cut from the main parking areas near the boat ramps to the campground and the Corps of Engineers agreed to allow the county to clear cut some forested area of the
tournament.

“The facility is going to be a lot more accommodating for the numbers that it has been in the past,” DuTeau said. “It’s really nice to see the park getting utilized that way.”

Columbia County Deputy Administrator Glenn Kennedy said considering the expected participants and estimated economic effect for the county, the changes will be well worth the effort.

The contract is a multi-year contract that can be canceled by the county or the ASA within 30 days after the first event next spring. But Tyrell said he hopes the move back into Columbia County is a long one.

And county Administrator Scott Johnson said happy to see the event return.

“We’re glad to have them back.”

Categories: Local

Sheriff will ask for revised pawn shop ordinance

Columbia County Sheriff Clay Whittle said Aug. 27 he will ask county commissioners to rescind and revise an ordinance meant stem sales of stolen goods, which has been criticized as too broad and burdensome for businesses that resale used merchandise.

The Columbia county Commission passed Ordinance 15-22 on April 21, which required certain businesses, such as pawn shops and jewelers, to collect information on each transaction when buying used goods from the public. The information included the seller’s identification, photo and thumb print. The law required businesses to transmit this information daily to a national database of transactions to assist law enforcement agencies with tracking and recovering stolen property.

Not long after it was implemented, however, some businesses began questioning some of the new law’s provisions and expressed concerns about its impact on business. Local lawyer, Andy Tisdale said the ordinance could be interpreted to apply to almost any business that buys and sells used goods and equipment, including used cars, calling is a “second-hand dealer law.”

In addition, Tisdale said the ordinance had conflicts with Constitutional law, where it compels business owners to comply with warrantless searches or face arrest.

Tisdale said he understood the desire to stem the flow of stolen goods, “but you have to balance that with constitutional rights and with the trouble that you are imposing on businesses for the furtherance of that objective.”

On Thursday, Whittle said he wanted to fix the ordinance’s shortcomings and come up with a more narrow version that applied to the businesses that require more scrutiny, not all those that sell used goods.

“The intent was never there to cast a wide net over anybody and everybody that sells second-hand anything, but there’s a legal opinion out there that the way the ordinance sits it could be construed that way,” Whittle said. “We want to correct the ordinance so there is no opinion out there that we know of that would say it is not legal.”

Whittle said there is a well established history of criminals abusing the pawn shop business model to move stolen goods. That is where the law needs to focus, he said.

As for tracking firearm sales, he said the law wasn’t intended to build a database of gun owners and he would oppose any law that did.

“I’m a Second Amendment guy, I do not want to ever come close to anything that could resemble a database, because I think that is horrible,” he said.

“Any country you can ever show me that ended up with a database of firearms, confiscated them, and I’m not going to be a part of that, I can promise you.”

On Thursday, Tisdale said he was happy to hear that sheriff wanted to revise the law.

If that is the sheriff’s position, it is the correct position,” he said. “I think this ordinance can be rewritten to address the sheriff’s office concerns, and comply with recent U.S. Supreme Court case law and still respect the constitutional rights of business owners.”

Categories: Local

Sheriff will ask for revised pawn shop ordinance

Columbia County Sheriff Clay Whittle said Aug. 27 he will ask county commissioners to rescind and revise an ordinance meant stem sales of stolen goods, which has been criticized as too broad and burdensome for businesses that resale used merchandise.

The Columbia county Commission passed Ordinance 15-22 on April 21, which required certain businesses, such as pawn shops and jewelers, to collect information on each transaction when buying used goods from the public. The information included the seller’s identification, photo and thumb print. The law required businesses to transmit this information daily to a national database of transactions to assist law enforcement agencies with tracking and recovering stolen property.

Not long after it was implemented, however, some businesses began questioning some of the new law’s provisions and expressed concerns about its impact on business. Local lawyer, Andy Tisdale said the ordinance could be interpreted to apply to almost any business that buys and sells used goods and equipment, including used cars, calling is a “second-hand dealer law.”

In addition, Tisdale said the ordinance had conflicts with Constitutional law, where it compels business owners to comply with warrantless searches or face arrest.

Tisdale said he understood the desire to stem the flow of stolen goods, “but you have to balance that with constitutional rights and with the trouble that you are imposing on businesses for the furtherance of that objective.”

On Thursday, Whittle said he wanted to fix the ordinance’s shortcomings and come up with a more narrow version that applied to the businesses that require more scrutiny, not all those that sell used goods.

“The intent was never there to cast a wide net over anybody and everybody that sells second-hand anything, but there’s a legal opinion out there that the way the ordinance sits it could be construed that way,” Whittle said. “We want to correct the ordinance so there is no opinion out there that we know of that would say it is not legal.”

Whittle said there is a well established history of criminals abusing the pawn shop business model to move stolen goods. That is where the law needs to focus, he said.

As for tracking firearm sales, he said the law wasn’t intended to build a database of gun owners and he would oppose any law that did.

“I’m a Second Amendment guy, I do not want to ever come close to anything that could resemble a database, because I think that is horrible,” he said.

“Any country you can ever show me that ended up with a database of firearms, confiscated them, and I’m not going to be a part of that, I can promise you.”

On Thursday, Tisdale said he was happy to hear that sheriff wanted to revise the law.

If that is the sheriff’s position, it is the correct position,” he said. “I think this ordinance can be rewritten to address the sheriff’s office concerns, and comply with recent U.S. Supreme Court case law and still respect the constitutional rights of business owners.”

Categories: Local

Police Blotter, Aug. 30, 2015

The following accounts were taken from Columbia County Sheriff’s Office incident reports:

Elderly woman reports theft

An Evans woman called authorities Aug. 25 after she said two men scammed their way into her home and stole money.

The 86-year-old woman said she was outside her home on her golf car at about 3 p.m., when a truck pulled into her driveway. Two men got out and started asking her about the property next door, if she knew who the owner was and if it was for sale. They then complimented the woman on how nice her landscaping looked and asked where the “man of the house” was. When she said her husband wasn’t home, the woman said the man maneuvered her into the carport, then into the kitchen. She said they never went any further than the entrance to her kitchen and left shortly after entering the house.

After the men left, the woman said she noticed her purse, which was on a table by the kitchen entrance, was disturbed and $100 in cash was missing. Nothing else was missing from her purse and her identification and credit cards were accounted for.

But a bottle with 10 hydrocodone pills in it was missing from a kitchen cabinet.

The woman described the men as white with dark hair and said they were scruffy, “kind of on the rough side,” driving a white possible extra cab truck with a South Carolina tag.

Caregiver scammed

A Grovetown woman said she was scammed as she tried to find employment on a site for caregivers.

The 46-year-old woman said she is a caregiver and signed up on www.care.com to find clients. She was contacted by a woman via text message who asked about care-giving services for her 76-year-old mother. After several text messages, the caregiver said she was hired.

The client told the caregiver that her mother would need a scooter and asked her to purchase one so they didn’t have to buy one and haul it to Georgia. The caregiver said the client sent her a $2,865 check with instructions to deposit it into her bank account.

She was told to then withdraw $2,465 to pay for the scooter and deposit it into an account at a different bank.

A short time after depositing the cash into the second account, a representative from the caregiver’s bank called and informed her that the check was fraudulent.

Man thwarts
an ID thief

A Grovetown man said on Aug. 24 that he kept someone from using his information to buy cell phones.

The 54-year-old man said he got a call from a restricted number at about 3 p.m. who identified himself as “Joe” from Verizon Wireless. The caller said an issue with the company computers required him to verify the man’s information. The man provided his last name, address and the last four digits of his Social Security number.

The man said he became suspicious when the caller asked about his last name.

He told the caller that he should know the last name if he was looking at his Verizon account. The caller hung up.

About 30 minutes later, the man received a call from a Verizon representative asking him to confirm his order for two iPhones.

He was told the phones were to be shipped to Duluth, Ga. He told the Verizon representative that he did not order the phones and canceled the order.

Californian uses man’s identity

A Martinez man called authorities Aug. 26 after he received a traffic citation from California.

The 34-year-old man said that someone used his identity on June 14 to rent a 2014 Chrysler 300 in Los Angeles.

The vehicle was returned the same day.

The person who rented the vehicle used the man’s Georgia drivers license number and his old Augusta address. He said the person drive through a toll in California without paying the toll fee on June 14.

A violation management company sent the man a citation that required him to pay a fine for the violation.

Categories: Local

Police Blotter, Aug. 30, 2015

The following accounts were taken from Columbia County Sheriff’s Office incident reports:

Elderly woman reports theft

An Evans woman called authorities Aug. 25 after she said two men scammed their way into her home and stole money.

The 86-year-old woman said she was outside her home on her golf car at about 3 p.m., when a truck pulled into her driveway. Two men got out and started asking her about the property next door, if she knew who the owner was and if it was for sale. They then complimented the woman on how nice her landscaping looked and asked where the “man of the house” was. When she said her husband wasn’t home, the woman said the man maneuvered her into the carport, then into the kitchen. She said they never went any further than the entrance to her kitchen and left shortly after entering the house.

After the men left, the woman said she noticed her purse, which was on a table by the kitchen entrance, was disturbed and $100 in cash was missing. Nothing else was missing from her purse and her identification and credit cards were accounted for.

But a bottle with 10 hydrocodone pills in it was missing from a kitchen cabinet.

The woman described the men as white with dark hair and said they were scruffy, “kind of on the rough side,” driving a white possible extra cab truck with a South Carolina tag.

Caregiver scammed

A Grovetown woman said she was scammed as she tried to find employment on a site for caregivers.

The 46-year-old woman said she is a caregiver and signed up on www.care.com to find clients. She was contacted by a woman via text message who asked about care-giving services for her 76-year-old mother. After several text messages, the caregiver said she was hired.

The client told the caregiver that her mother would need a scooter and asked her to purchase one so they didn’t have to buy one and haul it to Georgia. The caregiver said the client sent her a $2,865 check with instructions to deposit it into her bank account.

She was told to then withdraw $2,465 to pay for the scooter and deposit it into an account at a different bank.

A short time after depositing the cash into the second account, a representative from the caregiver’s bank called and informed her that the check was fraudulent.

Man thwarts
an ID thief

A Grovetown man said on Aug. 24 that he kept someone from using his information to buy cell phones.

The 54-year-old man said he got a call from a restricted number at about 3 p.m. who identified himself as “Joe” from Verizon Wireless. The caller said an issue with the company computers required him to verify the man’s information. The man provided his last name, address and the last four digits of his Social Security number.

The man said he became suspicious when the caller asked about his last name.

He told the caller that he should know the last name if he was looking at his Verizon account. The caller hung up.

About 30 minutes later, the man received a call from a Verizon representative asking him to confirm his order for two iPhones.

He was told the phones were to be shipped to Duluth, Ga. He told the Verizon representative that he did not order the phones and canceled the order.

Californian uses man’s identity

A Martinez man called authorities Aug. 26 after he received a traffic citation from California.

The 34-year-old man said that someone used his identity on June 14 to rent a 2014 Chrysler 300 in Los Angeles.

The vehicle was returned the same day.

The person who rented the vehicle used the man’s Georgia drivers license number and his old Augusta address. He said the person drive through a toll in California without paying the toll fee on June 14.

A violation management company sent the man a citation that required him to pay a fine for the violation.

Categories: Local

Grovetown officials seeking funding for new wastewater treatment plant

Grovetown officials took a big step Aug. 26 toward building their own wastewater treatment plant.

They passed a resolution allowing city staffers to submit an application for a $23.2 million loan from the Georgia Environmental Finance Authority for construction of the plant.

“We’ll wait and see what happens,” Mayor George James said. “We’re hoping and keeping our fingers crossed that everything will meet their satisfaction and we can proceed.”

The city waited for a while for a resolution to their wastewater problem. The city currently sends about 17 million gallons of wastewater per month to Columbia County and another 2.5-3 million gallons to Richmond County every month.

In addition, some wastewater is send to the city’s land application system off Lakeside Drive. At that facility, holding ponds are used for wastewater that is then sprayed onto spray fields.

The problem is that the fields don’t properly percolate like they were designed to limiting the amount of wastewater that can be disposed of there.

The facility, built in the late 1980s, is permitted by the Environmental Protect Division to released 580,000 gallons a day onto the spray fields.

Public Works Director Michael Woods said they use the spray fields as much as possible, spray as much as will be absorbed before running off, which is considerably less than its capacity.

In May, the average amount of
wastewater sprayed onto the fields was 117,000 gallons per day and 198,000 in June.

The city was cited by EPD for violations involving run-off, discharge into state water, sampling procedures and exceeding suspended solids and nitrate limits.

The city paid the $10,000 fine, but also got an EPD permit for a new wastewater pollution control plant on the same site.

“We’ve been fighting to get one of those for years,” James said.

EPD officials wouldn’t grant the city a permit for discharge into Butler Creek because Fort Gordon’s wastewater was already being discharged into the waterway and there was not enough “flow” in Euchee Creek. But Richmond County had since taken over Fort Gordon’s wastewater treatment allowing the city to discharge into Butler Creek, James said.

Woods said before applying for the loan or any design took place, the city contracted engineers for an antidegradation study to explore possible solutions.

The construction of a new plant was deemed the smartest move instead of buying more land for spray fields or sending more wastewater to other municipalities.

“It needs to be done bad,” Woods said. “I’d love to be able to start building it next week.”
Woods said the plant has not yet been formally designed, but the proposed design will accommodate about 3 million gallons of wastewater a
day.

The city currently produces less than 1 million gallons a day that is either sent to Columbia or Richmond counties or sprayed onto the treatment fields.

“We’ll be able to handle everything, including what’s going to Columbia County and Richmond County,” Woods said. “That is looking out for the future.”

James said city officials have been trying in recent years to beef up the city’s infrastructure to handle expected growth from Fort Gordon.

“It’s a necessity,” James said of a new plant. “We’ll probably be self-sufficient. ... We definitely are going to build beyond our current needs. That’s just good planning.”

The estimated $23.2 million price tag includes construction and permitting of the plant, but also some upgrades to the water and sewer system to reroute some pipes.

Woods said there is no clear timeline for the project, which still needs ot be formally designed. Once designs are approved and construction bids are accepted, he expects construction to take about three years.

James said that if all goes smoothly, the water treatment plant is expected to be operational in less than five
years.

Categories: Local

Grovetown officials seeking funding for new wastewater treatment plant

Grovetown officials took a big step Aug. 26 toward building their own wastewater treatment plant.

They passed a resolution allowing city staffers to submit an application for a $23.2 million loan from the Georgia Environmental Finance Authority for construction of the plant.

“We’ll wait and see what happens,” Mayor George James said. “We’re hoping and keeping our fingers crossed that everything will meet their satisfaction and we can proceed.”

The city waited for a while for a resolution to their wastewater problem. The city currently sends about 17 million gallons of wastewater per month to Columbia County and another 2.5-3 million gallons to Richmond County every month.

In addition, some wastewater is send to the city’s land application system off Lakeside Drive. At that facility, holding ponds are used for wastewater that is then sprayed onto spray fields.

The problem is that the fields don’t properly percolate like they were designed to limiting the amount of wastewater that can be disposed of there.

The facility, built in the late 1980s, is permitted by the Environmental Protect Division to released 580,000 gallons a day onto the spray fields.

Public Works Director Michael Woods said they use the spray fields as much as possible, spray as much as will be absorbed before running off, which is considerably less than its capacity.

In May, the average amount of
wastewater sprayed onto the fields was 117,000 gallons per day and 198,000 in June.

The city was cited by EPD for violations involving run-off, discharge into state water, sampling procedures and exceeding suspended solids and nitrate limits.

The city paid the $10,000 fine, but also got an EPD permit for a new wastewater pollution control plant on the same site.

“We’ve been fighting to get one of those for years,” James said.

EPD officials wouldn’t grant the city a permit for discharge into Butler Creek because Fort Gordon’s wastewater was already being discharged into the waterway and there was not enough “flow” in Euchee Creek. But Richmond County had since taken over Fort Gordon’s wastewater treatment allowing the city to discharge into Butler Creek, James said.

Woods said before applying for the loan or any design took place, the city contracted engineers for an antidegradation study to explore possible solutions.

The construction of a new plant was deemed the smartest move instead of buying more land for spray fields or sending more wastewater to other municipalities.

“It needs to be done bad,” Woods said. “I’d love to be able to start building it next week.”
Woods said the plant has not yet been formally designed, but the proposed design will accommodate about 3 million gallons of wastewater a
day.

The city currently produces less than 1 million gallons a day that is either sent to Columbia or Richmond counties or sprayed onto the treatment fields.

“We’ll be able to handle everything, including what’s going to Columbia County and Richmond County,” Woods said. “That is looking out for the future.”

James said city officials have been trying in recent years to beef up the city’s infrastructure to handle expected growth from Fort Gordon.

“It’s a necessity,” James said of a new plant. “We’ll probably be self-sufficient. ... We definitely are going to build beyond our current needs. That’s just good planning.”

The estimated $23.2 million price tag includes construction and permitting of the plant, but also some upgrades to the water and sewer system to reroute some pipes.

Woods said there is no clear timeline for the project, which still needs ot be formally designed. Once designs are approved and construction bids are accepted, he expects construction to take about three years.

James said that if all goes smoothly, the water treatment plant is expected to be operational in less than five
years.

Categories: Local
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