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Early voting begins May 14

Voting in the upcoming General Primary and Nonpartisan General Election have begun.

Absentee by mail ballots were sent out beginning April 8, and in-person early voting is scheduled to begin May 2 at the Columbia County Board of Elections office in Evans.

Saturday voting will be available on May 14 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the elections office, Stevens Creek Community Church and Patriot’s Park.

For the final week of voting May 16 - 20, the three voting sites will be open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

To confirm voter registration, view sample ballots, or locate polling precincts, voters can visit www.mvp.sos.ga.gov.

Categories: Local

Early voting begins May 14

Voting in the upcoming General Primary and Nonpartisan General Election have begun.

Absentee by mail ballots were sent out beginning April 8, and in-person early voting is scheduled to begin May 2 at the Columbia County Board of Elections office in Evans.

Saturday voting will be available on May 14 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the elections office, Stevens Creek Community Church and Patriot’s Park.

For the final week of voting May 16 - 20, the three voting sites will be open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

To confirm voter registration, view sample ballots, or locate polling precincts, voters can visit www.mvp.sos.ga.gov.

Categories: Local

Williams: Prevent large patch with good lawn-care practices

As spring warm-season lawns continue to green up, diseases rear their ugly heads. The main culprit this time of year is a fungus that causes large patch. Large patch can infect all warm-season grasses, but centipede and St. Augustine are particularly susceptible.

Large patch appears in roughly circular patches that are yellow, tan or straw-brown with orange-brown borders. The patches are initially 2 to 3 feet in diameter, but can expand up to 10 feet or more, as the name “large patch” indicates. Early in the morning, a grayish ring can be seen in the area where the diseased grass and the healthy grass meet.

Large patch occurs in the spring and fall when environmental factors are favorable. Favorable conditions include humid days with temperatures ranging from 75 to 90 degrees and nighttime temperatures above 60 degrees.

The higher temperatures and humidity lead to an extended period of leaf wetness. This April produced perfect conditions for disease infestation.

Turfgrasses are also more susceptible when coming out of – or going into – dormancy. Therefore, spring and fall are the times of year the grass is most vulnerable because it is not growing as actively and is more stressed. The best way to protect your grass from disease is to properly manage the turf.

The best way to prevent large patch in your grass is by following good lawn-care practices. This is much easier and less expensive than the use of fungicides and can be very effective. Here are a few practices to keep in mind:

• Avoid high nitrogen rates on warm-season grasses in mid- to late fall or in early spring. The disease-causing fungus readily attacks the lush growth of grass that nitrogen promotes. Avoid fast-release forms of nitrogen fertilizer.

• Irrigate grass only when needed and to a depth of 4 to 6 inches (1 inch of irrigation water per week). Water early in the morning to reduce extended leaf wetness. This disease can spread fast when moisture is present.

• Avoid spreading the disease to other areas. Remove clippings to prevent spread to other areas during mowing.

• Keep lawns mowed on a regular basis to the proper height for the grass species. Lower than optimum mowing height can increase disease severity.

• Provide good drainage for both surface and subsurface areas. Correct soil compaction by core aeration. Prevent excessive thatch buildup. A pitchfork can be an excellent aeration tool.

• Test the soil, and apply lime according to test recommendations. Disease may be more severe if the soil pH is less than 6.0

Centipede and St. Augustine are at peak growth when soil temperatures reach 65 degrees. In our area, the soil reaches this temperature in late April or early May.

This is the optimum time to fertilize. This is especially true of centipede and St. Augustine. When these grasses are fertilized too early, they turn yellow from stress.

The nitrogen in the fertilizer causes more top growth than the root system can support, and large patch can start.

If prevention is not an option and treatment is warranted, fungicide can control this disease.

There are many fungicides on the market labeled for use on lawns, and most will control large patch. In order for the fungicide to work properly, follow the directions on the product labeling. Products for cobtrol of Large Patch: Azoxystrobin-Propiconazole (Headway $$$$), Pyraclostrobin- triticonazole(Pillar G $$$$) or azoxystrobin + tebuconazole (Strobe T $$$$$) would be the best.

All of these listed are commercial products but can be purchased without a commercial pesticide license. The down side is they are expensive.

If price is a problem, visit big box stores or one of our local hardware/garden stores and look for Myclobutanil (Ferti-Lome F-Stop) or Propiconazole (Bayer Advanced Fungus Control for Lawns $$) for a less expensive fungicide. In order for the fungicide to work properly, follow the directions on the product labeling.

After treatment, the size of the patch should stop increasing. If the size of the patch continues to increase, another treatment is needed.

The grass then will fill in the areas affected by large patch. A good rule of thumb to follow on warm-season grasses is to initiate fungicide sprays when nighttime temperatures reach 60 degrees and stop applications when nighttime lows are forecast to be below 60 degrees for five consecutive days.

Typically, applications are made at 14- to 28-day intervals, depending upon the active ingredient in the fungicide. Also remember to alternate fungicides to prevent a buildup of resistance to a fungicide.

Tripp Williams, Columbia County’s agriculture and natural resource extension agent, can be reached at (706) 541- 4011 or trippj@uga.edu.

Categories: Local

Williams: Prevent large patch with good lawn-care practices

As spring warm-season lawns continue to green up, diseases rear their ugly heads. The main culprit this time of year is a fungus that causes large patch. Large patch can infect all warm-season grasses, but centipede and St. Augustine are particularly susceptible.

Large patch appears in roughly circular patches that are yellow, tan or straw-brown with orange-brown borders. The patches are initially 2 to 3 feet in diameter, but can expand up to 10 feet or more, as the name “large patch” indicates. Early in the morning, a grayish ring can be seen in the area where the diseased grass and the healthy grass meet.

Large patch occurs in the spring and fall when environmental factors are favorable. Favorable conditions include humid days with temperatures ranging from 75 to 90 degrees and nighttime temperatures above 60 degrees.

The higher temperatures and humidity lead to an extended period of leaf wetness. This April produced perfect conditions for disease infestation.

Turfgrasses are also more susceptible when coming out of – or going into – dormancy. Therefore, spring and fall are the times of year the grass is most vulnerable because it is not growing as actively and is more stressed. The best way to protect your grass from disease is to properly manage the turf.

The best way to prevent large patch in your grass is by following good lawn-care practices. This is much easier and less expensive than the use of fungicides and can be very effective. Here are a few practices to keep in mind:

• Avoid high nitrogen rates on warm-season grasses in mid- to late fall or in early spring. The disease-causing fungus readily attacks the lush growth of grass that nitrogen promotes. Avoid fast-release forms of nitrogen fertilizer.

• Irrigate grass only when needed and to a depth of 4 to 6 inches (1 inch of irrigation water per week). Water early in the morning to reduce extended leaf wetness. This disease can spread fast when moisture is present.

• Avoid spreading the disease to other areas. Remove clippings to prevent spread to other areas during mowing.

• Keep lawns mowed on a regular basis to the proper height for the grass species. Lower than optimum mowing height can increase disease severity.

• Provide good drainage for both surface and subsurface areas. Correct soil compaction by core aeration. Prevent excessive thatch buildup. A pitchfork can be an excellent aeration tool.

• Test the soil, and apply lime according to test recommendations. Disease may be more severe if the soil pH is less than 6.0

Centipede and St. Augustine are at peak growth when soil temperatures reach 65 degrees. In our area, the soil reaches this temperature in late April or early May.

This is the optimum time to fertilize. This is especially true of centipede and St. Augustine. When these grasses are fertilized too early, they turn yellow from stress.

The nitrogen in the fertilizer causes more top growth than the root system can support, and large patch can start.

If prevention is not an option and treatment is warranted, fungicide can control this disease.

There are many fungicides on the market labeled for use on lawns, and most will control large patch. In order for the fungicide to work properly, follow the directions on the product labeling. Products for cobtrol of Large Patch: Azoxystrobin-Propiconazole (Headway $$$$), Pyraclostrobin- triticonazole(Pillar G $$$$) or azoxystrobin + tebuconazole (Strobe T $$$$$) would be the best.

All of these listed are commercial products but can be purchased without a commercial pesticide license. The down side is they are expensive.

If price is a problem, visit big box stores or one of our local hardware/garden stores and look for Myclobutanil (Ferti-Lome F-Stop) or Propiconazole (Bayer Advanced Fungus Control for Lawns $$) for a less expensive fungicide. In order for the fungicide to work properly, follow the directions on the product labeling.

After treatment, the size of the patch should stop increasing. If the size of the patch continues to increase, another treatment is needed.

The grass then will fill in the areas affected by large patch. A good rule of thumb to follow on warm-season grasses is to initiate fungicide sprays when nighttime temperatures reach 60 degrees and stop applications when nighttime lows are forecast to be below 60 degrees for five consecutive days.

Typically, applications are made at 14- to 28-day intervals, depending upon the active ingredient in the fungicide. Also remember to alternate fungicides to prevent a buildup of resistance to a fungicide.

Tripp Williams, Columbia County’s agriculture and natural resource extension agent, can be reached at (706) 541- 4011 or trippj@uga.edu.

Categories: Local

Westminster girls win state title for first time in school history

The Westminster girls tennis team made history this past week.

The Lady Wildcats won the Georgia Independent Schools Association Class AAA championship for the first time in school history.

Westminster defeated Frederica Academy, Deerfield School and Brookwood to claim the state title.

In the team picture the following girls are (from left to right): Amy Grant, Emily Yarid, Michelle Iwama, Sarah Grace Heaton, Mary Garrett McLeod, Kylie Duckworth and Cameron Frank.

Categories: Local

Westminster girls win state title for first time in school history

The Westminster girls tennis team made history this past week.

The Lady Wildcats won the Georgia Independent Schools Association Class AAA championship for the first time in school history.

Westminster defeated Frederica Academy, Deerfield School and Brookwood to claim the state title.

In the team picture the following girls are (from left to right): Amy Grant, Emily Yarid, Michelle Iwama, Sarah Grace Heaton, Mary Garrett McLeod, Kylie Duckworth and Cameron Frank.

Categories: Local

Lakeside boys tennis team advance to third round of state playoffs

Defending Class AAAAA state champion Lakeside is continuing its winning ways on the tennis courts.

On Thursday, the defending state champs rolled to a 5-0 victory over Riverwood in the second round of the state playoffs.

The Lakeside boys improved to 18-1 on the season, the lone loss coming to a Spartanburg (S.C.) that was ranked fifth nationally last year. The Panthers will play host to a yet-to-be-determined opponent early this week – Lakeside coach Dave Pitock said he was unsure of the exact time and day. If Lakeside wins its third-round match, the Panthers will play at home in the state semifinals.

“Our boys just overpowered them,” Pitcock said of his region champion squad dispatching a tournament No. 3 seed. “From now on, the third round of the state is going to get a little harder and hopefully the fourth round, and if we keep winning, the state finals.”

In the girls competition, Riverwood edged Lakeside, 3-2. Marielle Leahy and Avery Harris each won matches for the Lady Panthers.

Lakeside senior Sam Dromsky wore a green “Range” cap he earned working Masters Week on the driving range at the Augusta National Golf Club. The Lakeside senior, who defeated Gaurav Kunwar, 6-0, 6-1, waited for news from his favorite college while he worked. Finally, Dromsky received a text message last Tuesday. Georgia tennis coach Manny Diaz offered him a preferred walk-on spot with the Bulldogs.

“To be able to have an opportunity and a roster spot, that’s the main goal I’ve always had,” said Dromsky, a National Honor Society member who applied to just two schools, Georgia and Wake Forest – he got accepted to both. Dromsky said he plans to major in biochemistry with the hopes of becoming a dentist, like his father, Joseph.

“I’m excited to get up there and get better.”

Before he heads to Athens, Dromsky is looking to add another state title with his teammates, who had little problems with the charter school from Sandy Springs, Ga.

Thomas Huff defeated Michael Roddey, 6-0, 6-1, while Faulkner Hain beat Ben Shainker, 6-0, 6-0. In doubles, Lakeside’s Drew Harris and Will Barksdale defeated Pascal Acree and Zach Katz, 6-2, 6-2, while Justin Horne and Jack Lawrence knocked off Carter Rozenboom and Slate Fluker, 6-0, 6-0.

“It was a good second-round win,” Dromsky said. “It was a little more competition. Everybody is now a little more challenging, there’s longer points. It’s getting hotter. You just have to make sure you stay focused the entire match.”

Categories: Local

Lakeside boys tennis team advance to third round of state playoffs

Defending Class AAAAA state champion Lakeside is continuing its winning ways on the tennis courts.

On Thursday, the defending state champs rolled to a 5-0 victory over Riverwood in the second round of the state playoffs.

The Lakeside boys improved to 18-1 on the season, the lone loss coming to a Spartanburg (S.C.) that was ranked fifth nationally last year. The Panthers will play host to a yet-to-be-determined opponent early this week – Lakeside coach Dave Pitock said he was unsure of the exact time and day. If Lakeside wins its third-round match, the Panthers will play at home in the state semifinals.

“Our boys just overpowered them,” Pitcock said of his region champion squad dispatching a tournament No. 3 seed. “From now on, the third round of the state is going to get a little harder and hopefully the fourth round, and if we keep winning, the state finals.”

In the girls competition, Riverwood edged Lakeside, 3-2. Marielle Leahy and Avery Harris each won matches for the Lady Panthers.

Lakeside senior Sam Dromsky wore a green “Range” cap he earned working Masters Week on the driving range at the Augusta National Golf Club. The Lakeside senior, who defeated Gaurav Kunwar, 6-0, 6-1, waited for news from his favorite college while he worked. Finally, Dromsky received a text message last Tuesday. Georgia tennis coach Manny Diaz offered him a preferred walk-on spot with the Bulldogs.

“To be able to have an opportunity and a roster spot, that’s the main goal I’ve always had,” said Dromsky, a National Honor Society member who applied to just two schools, Georgia and Wake Forest – he got accepted to both. Dromsky said he plans to major in biochemistry with the hopes of becoming a dentist, like his father, Joseph.

“I’m excited to get up there and get better.”

Before he heads to Athens, Dromsky is looking to add another state title with his teammates, who had little problems with the charter school from Sandy Springs, Ga.

Thomas Huff defeated Michael Roddey, 6-0, 6-1, while Faulkner Hain beat Ben Shainker, 6-0, 6-0. In doubles, Lakeside’s Drew Harris and Will Barksdale defeated Pascal Acree and Zach Katz, 6-2, 6-2, while Justin Horne and Jack Lawrence knocked off Carter Rozenboom and Slate Fluker, 6-0, 6-0.

“It was a good second-round win,” Dromsky said. “It was a little more competition. Everybody is now a little more challenging, there’s longer points. It’s getting hotter. You just have to make sure you stay focused the entire match.”

Categories: Local

Mildred Pollard Blanchard obituary

FROM STAFF REPORTS

Mrs. Mildred Pollard Blanchard, 95, entered into rest Wednesday, April 20, 2016.

Mrs. Blanchard was preceded in death by her parents, Griffin “Jake” Pollard Sr. and Mattie Kelley Pollard; a sister, June Pollard Crawford; two sons, Perry Caldwell Blanchard and Preston Kelley Blanchard; and the father of her children, John Pierce Blanchard Sr.

Survivors include her children, John Pierce Blanchard Jr. (Deborah); Patrick G. Blanchard (Gwen); and Philip B. Blanchard (Kay); one brother Griffin B. “Jake” Pollard, Jr. (Helen); nine grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren and three great-great-grandchildren; daughters-in-law Melissa Blanchard and Tonya Blanchard; and several nieces and nephews.

Mrs. Blanchard was born on June 18, 1920, in Appling.

She was a devoted wife, mother and homemaker. Mrs. Blanchard was a lifelong member of Kiokee Baptist Church and is remembered for her Christian faith and her love of God.

If so desired, memorials may be made to a charity of one’s choice.

The family gratefully acknowledges the care she received from her special caregivers, Priscilla Davis, Frankie Poole and Gail Cash.

Graveside services were held at 3 p.m. on Saturday, April 23, 2016, in the Kiokee Baptist Church Cemetery with the Rev.
Dr. Roger Bennett officiating.

The family received visitors in the sanctuary of Kiokee Baptist Church on Saturday from 2 until 3 p.m.

Please visit www.starling-evans.com to sign online guestbook. Starling-Evans Funeral Home, 435 W. Milledgeville Road. Harlem, GA. 30814. (706) 556-6524

Categories: Local

Mildred Pollard Blanchard obituary

FROM STAFF REPORTS

Mrs. Mildred Pollard Blanchard, 95, entered into rest Wednesday, April 20, 2016.

Mrs. Blanchard was preceded in death by her parents, Griffin “Jake” Pollard Sr. and Mattie Kelley Pollard; a sister, June Pollard Crawford; two sons, Perry Caldwell Blanchard and Preston Kelley Blanchard; and the father of her children, John Pierce Blanchard Sr.

Survivors include her children, John Pierce Blanchard Jr. (Deborah); Patrick G. Blanchard (Gwen); and Philip B. Blanchard (Kay); one brother Griffin B. “Jake” Pollard, Jr. (Helen); nine grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren and three great-great-grandchildren; daughters-in-law Melissa Blanchard and Tonya Blanchard; and several nieces and nephews.

Mrs. Blanchard was born on June 18, 1920, in Appling.

She was a devoted wife, mother and homemaker. Mrs. Blanchard was a lifelong member of Kiokee Baptist Church and is remembered for her Christian faith and her love of God.

If so desired, memorials may be made to a charity of one’s choice.

The family gratefully acknowledges the care she received from her special caregivers, Priscilla Davis, Frankie Poole and Gail Cash.

Graveside services were held at 3 p.m. on Saturday, April 23, 2016, in the Kiokee Baptist Church Cemetery with the Rev.
Dr. Roger Bennett officiating.

The family received visitors in the sanctuary of Kiokee Baptist Church on Saturday from 2 until 3 p.m.

Please visit www.starling-evans.com to sign online guestbook. Starling-Evans Funeral Home, 435 W. Milledgeville Road. Harlem, GA. 30814. (706) 556-6524

Categories: Local

Greenbrier's Romanowski accepts preferred walk-on slot with Appalachian State

Wolfpack senior long snapper Ben Romanowski celebrated with his family, friends and teammates this week as he officially became a preferred walk-on for Appalachian State.

Romanowski had committed to Appalachian State on April 11.

Appalachian State went 11-2 in 2015, beating Ohio in the Camellia Bowl in its first year of bowl eligibility. The Mountaineers are coached by Scott Satterfield, who signed a five-year extension in October.

“They make everything a family,” Romanowski said about the Mountaineers. “Having three different coaches in high school, I really wanted to make sure I had one coach.”

As for the school and the town of Boone, N.C., itself, Romanowski said everything about Appalachian State made him want to go there. He visited the school last summer and returned for two more visits.

Three area players are on the Mountaineers’ roster: offensive linemen Parker Collins and Victor Johnson (both of North Augusta) and receiver Zy Letman (Lincoln County).

“The coach has been telling me I have a possibility of starting my first year,” Romanowski said. “We’re going to be competing, me and the other two guys, but hopefully it’s going to be neck and
neck.”

There’s one day Ro­manow­ski can’t help but think about, even if it’s more than a year away: Sept. 2, 2017, when Appalachian State is scheduled to visit Geor­gia. That could be Romanowski’s first start.

“I grew up a Dawg, but I’m a Mountain­eer now,” he said.

Categories: Local

Greenbrier's Romanowski accepts preferred walk-on slot with Appalachian State

Wolfpack senior long snapper Ben Romanowski celebrated with his family, friends and teammates this week as he officially became a preferred walk-on for Appalachian State.

Romanowski had committed to Appalachian State on April 11.

Appalachian State went 11-2 in 2015, beating Ohio in the Camellia Bowl in its first year of bowl eligibility. The Mountaineers are coached by Scott Satterfield, who signed a five-year extension in October.

“They make everything a family,” Romanowski said about the Mountaineers. “Having three different coaches in high school, I really wanted to make sure I had one coach.”

As for the school and the town of Boone, N.C., itself, Romanowski said everything about Appalachian State made him want to go there. He visited the school last summer and returned for two more visits.

Three area players are on the Mountaineers’ roster: offensive linemen Parker Collins and Victor Johnson (both of North Augusta) and receiver Zy Letman (Lincoln County).

“The coach has been telling me I have a possibility of starting my first year,” Romanowski said. “We’re going to be competing, me and the other two guys, but hopefully it’s going to be neck and
neck.”

There’s one day Ro­manow­ski can’t help but think about, even if it’s more than a year away: Sept. 2, 2017, when Appalachian State is scheduled to visit Geor­gia. That could be Romanowski’s first start.

“I grew up a Dawg, but I’m a Mountain­eer now,” he said.

Categories: Local

Greenbrier golfers Duffie and Madison sign college offers

Drew Duffie and Cole Madison got all the distractions out of the way before Monday’s Region 2-AAAAA championship.

The two members of Greenbrier’s golf team will try to help the Wolfpack win a title when they play at Jones Creek Golf Club. But first, they made their respective futures official.

On Wednesday afternoon, Duffie signed with Piedmont College, while Madison signed with Savannah State.

“It’s cool to have your good friends playing college golf,” said Duffie, whose teammates States Fort and Alex Wells also have signed college offers. “You know this isn’t your last year. You’re constantly pushing yourself to get better. You want to keep your game up heading into next year.”

The 6-foot-5, 230-pound Madison looks like he could’ve signed a football scholarship. Instead, he chose golf full-time after getting hit on the gridiron as a seventh-grader. His heart stopped for 30 seconds. After being revived, he never played football again.

“It was a pretty crazy experience,” he said. “I put the pads up after that.”

Savannah State plays in NCAA Division I in the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference. The Tigers, who finished second to Augusta University in the 2015 MEAC Championship, have won two tournaments this season.

“One of the main reasons I chose it is because of the city, Savannah, and its great atmosphere,” Madison said. “And it’s a really great school.”

Madison said he’s planning to get his business management degree if he’s unable to get his PGA Tour card.

“It’s been my goal ever since I started,” Madison said playing on the PGA Tour. “Now that I realize the seriousness of it, I’m more focused on the little parts like the mental aspect and other parts of the game. I can hit it 330 yards, but everybody can do that now.”

Duffie (5-11, 150) started playing golf when he was “5 or 6” but not competitively until he was 13. He said he drew the attention of Piedmont after being a part of the winning East team in the Georgia State Golf Association Junior Sectional Challenge Match this past summer in Warner Robins, Ga.

Piedmont College, located about an hour north of Athens, Ga., is an NCAA Division III school that plays in the USA South Athletic Conference. The Lions have won two tournaments this season.

“I’m looking forward to it,” Duffie said. “It’s a smaller school. That’s one of the reasons I wanted to go there. I’m hoping to get some more playing time and develop my game more. Then, I’ll re-evaluate my game after about two years.”

Duffie said he plans to major in pre-med or sports broadcasting.

Categories: Local

Greenbrier golfers Duffie and Madison sign college offers

Drew Duffie and Cole Madison got all the distractions out of the way before Monday’s Region 2-AAAAA championship.

The two members of Greenbrier’s golf team will try to help the Wolfpack win a title when they play at Jones Creek Golf Club. But first, they made their respective futures official.

On Wednesday afternoon, Duffie signed with Piedmont College, while Madison signed with Savannah State.

“It’s cool to have your good friends playing college golf,” said Duffie, whose teammates States Fort and Alex Wells also have signed college offers. “You know this isn’t your last year. You’re constantly pushing yourself to get better. You want to keep your game up heading into next year.”

The 6-foot-5, 230-pound Madison looks like he could’ve signed a football scholarship. Instead, he chose golf full-time after getting hit on the gridiron as a seventh-grader. His heart stopped for 30 seconds. After being revived, he never played football again.

“It was a pretty crazy experience,” he said. “I put the pads up after that.”

Savannah State plays in NCAA Division I in the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference. The Tigers, who finished second to Augusta University in the 2015 MEAC Championship, have won two tournaments this season.

“One of the main reasons I chose it is because of the city, Savannah, and its great atmosphere,” Madison said. “And it’s a really great school.”

Madison said he’s planning to get his business management degree if he’s unable to get his PGA Tour card.

“It’s been my goal ever since I started,” Madison said playing on the PGA Tour. “Now that I realize the seriousness of it, I’m more focused on the little parts like the mental aspect and other parts of the game. I can hit it 330 yards, but everybody can do that now.”

Duffie (5-11, 150) started playing golf when he was “5 or 6” but not competitively until he was 13. He said he drew the attention of Piedmont after being a part of the winning East team in the Georgia State Golf Association Junior Sectional Challenge Match this past summer in Warner Robins, Ga.

Piedmont College, located about an hour north of Athens, Ga., is an NCAA Division III school that plays in the USA South Athletic Conference. The Lions have won two tournaments this season.

“I’m looking forward to it,” Duffie said. “It’s a smaller school. That’s one of the reasons I wanted to go there. I’m hoping to get some more playing time and develop my game more. Then, I’ll re-evaluate my game after about two years.”

Duffie said he plans to major in pre-med or sports broadcasting.

Categories: Local

Exhibition center to host roller derby tournament

The Soul City Sirens will host their third WFTDA D3 Roller Derby Tournament May 20-22 at the Columbia County Exhibition Center. All bouts will be sanctioned and will count towards each team’s national rankings.

This bracketed tournament is sponsored by the Women’s Flat Track Derby Association. There will be 12 teams and 16 games.

ABOUT THE TEAM: The Soul City Sirens roller derby league, formed in 2008, is the all-female flat track roller derby league of Augusta, and part of the modern women’s roller derby phenomenon.

The Soul City Sirens, inc. is an amateur 501c4 non-profit flat-track roller derby league based in Augusta.

Soul City Sirens, inc. follows the WFTDA rules and regulations.

The Soul City Sirens strive to promote athleticism and camaraderie among their skaters through competitive sport, regular practice, and do-it-yourself management.

Every member is expected to exhibit behavior that brings honor and distinction to the league, the sport of roller derby, and the WFTDA.

They are 100 percent skater owned and operated, with members running all facets of league management, including bout production, coaching, marketing and public relations, and merchandising.

Practice sessions are held at Redwing Rollerway at 3065 Washington road, in
Augusta.

Categories: Local

Exhibition center to host roller derby tournament

The Soul City Sirens will host their third WFTDA D3 Roller Derby Tournament May 20-22 at the Columbia County Exhibition Center. All bouts will be sanctioned and will count towards each team’s national rankings.

This bracketed tournament is sponsored by the Women’s Flat Track Derby Association. There will be 12 teams and 16 games.

ABOUT THE TEAM: The Soul City Sirens roller derby league, formed in 2008, is the all-female flat track roller derby league of Augusta, and part of the modern women’s roller derby phenomenon.

The Soul City Sirens, inc. is an amateur 501c4 non-profit flat-track roller derby league based in Augusta.

Soul City Sirens, inc. follows the WFTDA rules and regulations.

The Soul City Sirens strive to promote athleticism and camaraderie among their skaters through competitive sport, regular practice, and do-it-yourself management.

Every member is expected to exhibit behavior that brings honor and distinction to the league, the sport of roller derby, and the WFTDA.

They are 100 percent skater owned and operated, with members running all facets of league management, including bout production, coaching, marketing and public relations, and merchandising.

Practice sessions are held at Redwing Rollerway at 3065 Washington road, in
Augusta.

Categories: Local

Current Events

Tax help

Free tax preparation help, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mondays through April 18, Euchee Creek Library, 5097 Euchee Creek Drive; 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday through April 16, Columbia County Library, 7022 Evans Towne Center Blvd.; (706) 863-1946

Food Frenzy

Georgia Legal Food Frenzy food drive, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. April 18-29; Law Offices of Nathan M. Jolles, 2812A Hillcreek Ct., Augusta; donations of nonperishable, non-breakable canned goods and boxes and monetary donations will be accepted; (706) 737-0266

Civil War talk

Civil War Round Table of Augusta meeting, 6 p.m. April 18, Snelling Center, 3165 Washington Road; dinner catered by Edgar’s Restaurant and is $12; dues are $25 per year; speaker W. Todd Groce, the president of Georgia Historical Society; (706) 736-2909, gfy@gwenfulcheryoung.com; civilwarroundtableaugustaga.com

Football registration

Registration is now open for the 2016 Evans Pop Warner fall football and cheer season. Participants who register before June 1 will receive a $20 discount. For more information, visit to evanspopwarner.com

Call for artisans

The Harlem Arts Council is seeking original pieces from art to pottery and everything in between for the April 23 Arts at the Gazebo in Glenn Phillips Park in Harlem. Call Ann at (706) 556-6656 or e-mail Blalocka@hotmail.com.

National Chill Out Day

Enjoy a free Kona Ice at the Columbia County Chamber of Commerce office Monday, April 18 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. to celebrate National Chill Out Day. The Chamber office is located at 1000 Business Boulevard in the Evans Government Center.

Physician education series: abdominal pain

Abdominal Pain: What Does it Mean? 6 p.m. April 19, Snelling Center, 3165 Washington Road; free; Dr. Sherman M. Chamberlain, gastroenterologist; registration required; call (706) 774-7770

’Til the Cows Come Home

Third Annual ’Til the Cows Come Home Benefit 5K Run/Walk, 5:30 p.m. April 22, Steed’s Dairy Farm, 4634 Wrightsboro Road, Grovetown; $25 advance, $30 day of event; this trail run is both fun and challenging with sections of small hill running; families welcome; proceeds benefit Christ Community Health Services Augusta; go to cchsaugusta.org/events to register; cchsaugusta.org/events

Kids’ Day

Columbia County Day 4 Kids, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. April 30, Patriots Park, 5445 Columbia Road; includes area businesses, nonprofits; health fair, activities for children, obstacle course, a Walk4Kids

Butterfly Hearts

Butterfly Hearts Support Group, 6 p.m. April 21, Columbia County Library, 7022 Evans Towne Center Blvd.; New grief support ministry for mothers who have experienced the loss of a child; the group’s objectives are to connect, share like experiences, encourage, love, and pray for one another; meetings are currently scheduled for April 21 and May 19, and will plan to meet every third Thursday

Beer and Barbecue

Blues, Brews and BBQ, 6:30 p.m. April 22 and 29, Columbia County Amphitheater, 7022 Evans Towne Center Blvd.; $5; Barbecue by Southbound Smokehouse, wine by Vineyard Wines, featuring Soul Dimension Band, Roger “Hurricane” Wilson, The Mason Jars and Funky Brewster; columbiacountyga.gov

Professional Rodeo

American Heroes Pro Rodeo, 5:30 p.m. April 22-23, Columbia County Fairgrounds, 5462 Columbia Road; $10 advance, $12 at gate; one of the largest rodeos in the Southeast; IPRA-sanctioned; concessions; proceeds will benefit the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Augusta; for more, go to the American Heroes Pro Rodeo Facebook

Beer festival

Augusta Craft Beer Festival, from noon to 5 p.m. April 23, Lake Olmstead Stadium, 78 Milledge Road; featuring 40 local, regional and national breweries; VIP event begins 11 a.m.; eventbrite.com/e/augusta-craft-beer-festival-tickets-20114064709

Arts at the Gazebo

10 a.m. April 23, 170 W. Milledgeville Road, Harlem; crafts and handmade items for sale, food vendors, artwork, childrens activities, artist demonstrations, live music and a book signing; (706) 556-6656 or (706) 513-2634

Athlete screening

Free cardiac screening for student
athletes in grades 6-12: EKG, cardiac ultrasound, blood pressure and
heart rhythm check, blood sugar and cholesterol checks, body mass index, 8 a.m. to noon April 23, University Evans Campus Imaging Center, 4350 Towne Centre Dr.; only 200 slots available; call (706) 744-8870

Music that matters

Music That Matters, noon April 23, Evans Towne Center Park, 7016 Evans Town Center Blvd.; free; concert by local youth and 4-H Club Showcase; inflatables, 4-H Club exhibitions, animals, robotics, archery; bring lawn chairs; food and drink available for purchase; bit.ly/1ZRhU5y

Bridal Show

Bridal Show 2016, noon to 4 p.m. April 24, Snelling Center, 3165 Washington Road; free; visit edgars
hospitality.com or call (706) 854-4728

Signal Corps Band

Fort Gordon Signal Corps Band Legacy Tour, 3 p.m. April 24; Evans Towne Center Park, 7016 Evans Town Center Blvd.; free; gordon.army.mil/band

Art Gallery opening

Lincoln Artisans Gallery Grand Opening, Lincoln County Historical Park; 2 p.m. April 24; Lincoln County Historical Park, 147 Lumber St.; music, food, art, live music and book signings; (706) 990-0734

CSRA Republican Women’s Club

Dinner 6 p.m., business meeting 7 p.m., April 25, Jones Creek Golf Club, 777 Evans to Locks Road; Republican candidates from Senate Districts 23 & 24, from House District 123, Columbia County District 1 and Columbia County Coroner; reservations required for dinner only, dinner $12, is due on or before April 21; (706) 830-5730

Paddle festival

Benderdinker 2016, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 30, Riverside Park, 4431 Hardy McManus Road; $35; paddle and land festival featuring live music and food; games include corn hole, Bocce ball, mini disc golf; craft beer; benefits Augusta Locally Grown and Bender Digger, a program that teaches youth about gardening; benderdinker.com

Relay for Life

From noon to 10 p.m. April 30, Evans Towne Center Park, 7016 Evans Town Center Blvd.; In case of rain, event will be moved to the gym at Wesley United Methodist Church on North Belair Road; main.acsevents.org/site/TR?pg=entry&fr_id=70777

BBQ Cook Off

Holy Smokes BBQ Cook Off, 10 a.m. April 30, Columbia County Fairgrounds, 5462 Columbia Road; 10 a.m. April 30; Free; features inflatables, cooking competition and family fun; holysmokescookoff.com

Brown Bash

James Brown Birthday Bash, 5 p.m. May 3, Augusta Common, 836 Reynolds St.; $15 advance, $20 day of show; by Friends with Benefits, City of Augusta and James Brown Family Foundation; benefits JAMP; JBfamilyBash.com

Faith concert

Sharon Baptist Church Choir will present the AWESOME GOD CONCERT, on Sunday, May 1 at 6 p.m. The concert is free and will be held in our Family Life Center behind the Sanctuary. Come as you are and prepare to hear an hour of music that will lift your heart.The church is located at 6262 Cobbham Rd. in Appling. Call (706) 541-0667.

Documentary screening

The Thomson-McDuffie County Convention & Visitors Bureau will hold a free, public screening of the documentary film Blind Willie’s Blues on Friday, May 6 at 7 p.m. at the Thomson Depot at 111 Railroad Street in Thomson. After the screening, David Fulmer, the writer and producer of the movie, will give a brief talk and offer a question & answer session for the audience. The event is free and open to the public.


Soul Food

Soul Food Festival, 2 p.m. May 7, Lady Antebellum Pavillion, 7016 Evans Town Center Blvd.; $35-$65; Gates open 2 p.m., show starts 4 p.m.; performers include Rick James and Stone City Band; The Bar Kays, Ohio Players, Slave, Midnight Star, Lakeside, and Sapp; $35 general admission, $45 preferred viewing, $65 VIP seating; ilovesoulfood.com/augusta-ga

Rock & Run

9 a.m. May 7, Blanchard Woods Park, 4600 Blanchard Woods Road; 5K and 1 mile run run; register at active.com; (706) 650-9467

Giant yard sale

Columbia County Giant Community Yard Sale, 7 a.m. May 14-15, Columbia County Fairgrounds, 5642 Columbia Road; Sponsored by the Rotary Club of Columbia County; rent a space and keep the profits; register online; giantcommunityyardsale.com

Sips and Sass

7 p.m. May 14, Riverwood Plantation Barn, 5123 Riverwood Pkwy.; $20; Benefits Ronald McDonald House Charities; presented by the Aiken-Augusta Alumnae Assocation of Alpha Delta Pi; hor d’oeuvres, drinks, dancing and silent auction; for tickets, go to http://bit.ly/1M5AYut

Papa Joe’s Banjo-B-Que

4 p.m. May 27, Evans Towne Center Park, 7016 Evans Town Center Blvd.; $60 weekend pass; featuring Willie Nelson and Family, Old Crow Medicine Show, Steep Canyon Rangers, Blitzen Trapper, Mountain Faith, Sarah Jaroz, Rev. Peyton’s Big Damn Band, Susto, Ben Miller, Have Gun Will Travel, Guthrie Brown & the Family Tree, and more; Little Roy & Lizzie Show and more; Kansas City Barbeque Society sanctioned barbecue competition; craft beer, petting zoo, pig races and more; banjobque.com

Christian singles

6:30-10:30 p.m. Saturdays, Ballroom Dance Center, 525 Grand Slam Drive, off Evans-to- to Locks Road; dance lessons 6:30-7:30 p.m., dance 7:30-10:30 p.m.; refreshments; Augusta Christian Singles; $8 members, $10 others; (762) 233-1978, christiandances.org

Eyeglass help

Financial assistance for qualifying Grovetown residents’ eyeglasses; Grove-town Lions Club Eyeglass Program, P.O. Box 248, Grovetown, GA 30813

Farmers market

4:30-7 p.m. Thursdays through Oct. 30, Columbia County Amphitheater, 7022 Evans Town Center Blvd.; Evans Towne Farmers Market; cooking demos and vegetable gardening education; kim@augustalocallygrown.org, evanstownefarmersmarket.com.

Food pantry

9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday-Thursday, 1959 Appling Harlem Highway, Appling; Columbia County Cares Food Pantry; (706) 541-2834

Gold club

Gold Prospectors Association of America meets 7-9 p.m. second Thursdays, Dayspring Baptist Church, 4220 Belair Frontage Road; (706) 496-4611

Live Wrestling

First Saturday every month; doors open 7:30 p.m., bell time 8 p.m., Patriots Park Gymnasium, 5445 Columbia Road, Grovetown; $10 front row, $7 general admission, 5 and younger free; flatlineprowrestling.com

Hospital classes

Classes each month; Doctors Hospital; (706) 651-2450, doctors-hospital.net

Meditations

4:30 p.m. Wednesdays, Mindbody Stress Reduction Programs, 4210 Columbia Road Suite 4A, Martinez; Mindfulness and Expansive Meditations; $15, $5 students with ID; (706) 496-3935, mindbodystressreduction.com

Female veterans

11 a.m. first Saturdays; The Women’s Veterans Club; $24 per year; April Starks (706) 868-5601

Writers group

6:30 p.m. third Mondays, Georgia Military College, 115 Davis Road; CSRA Writers Group; free, open to the public; for a critique, bring eight copies of up to 10 pages of work (double-spaced); (706) 836-7315

Zumba classes

6:30-7:30 p.m. Thursdays, Mondays, Evans Christian Academy, 213 S. Old Belair Road, Grovetown; $5 per class; (706) 364-3565, evanschristianacademy.org

Wine tastings

4:30-6:30 p.m. Fridays, 1-6 p.m. Saturdays, Vineyard Wine Market, 4414 Evans to Locks Road, Evans; (706) 922-9463, vine11.com

Categories: Local

Current Events

Tax help

Free tax preparation help, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mondays through April 18, Euchee Creek Library, 5097 Euchee Creek Drive; 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday through April 16, Columbia County Library, 7022 Evans Towne Center Blvd.; (706) 863-1946

Food Frenzy

Georgia Legal Food Frenzy food drive, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. April 18-29; Law Offices of Nathan M. Jolles, 2812A Hillcreek Ct., Augusta; donations of nonperishable, non-breakable canned goods and boxes and monetary donations will be accepted; (706) 737-0266

Civil War talk

Civil War Round Table of Augusta meeting, 6 p.m. April 18, Snelling Center, 3165 Washington Road; dinner catered by Edgar’s Restaurant and is $12; dues are $25 per year; speaker W. Todd Groce, the president of Georgia Historical Society; (706) 736-2909, gfy@gwenfulcheryoung.com; civilwarroundtableaugustaga.com

Football registration

Registration is now open for the 2016 Evans Pop Warner fall football and cheer season. Participants who register before June 1 will receive a $20 discount. For more information, visit to evanspopwarner.com

Call for artisans

The Harlem Arts Council is seeking original pieces from art to pottery and everything in between for the April 23 Arts at the Gazebo in Glenn Phillips Park in Harlem. Call Ann at (706) 556-6656 or e-mail Blalocka@hotmail.com.

National Chill Out Day

Enjoy a free Kona Ice at the Columbia County Chamber of Commerce office Monday, April 18 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. to celebrate National Chill Out Day. The Chamber office is located at 1000 Business Boulevard in the Evans Government Center.

Physician education series: abdominal pain

Abdominal Pain: What Does it Mean? 6 p.m. April 19, Snelling Center, 3165 Washington Road; free; Dr. Sherman M. Chamberlain, gastroenterologist; registration required; call (706) 774-7770

’Til the Cows Come Home

Third Annual ’Til the Cows Come Home Benefit 5K Run/Walk, 5:30 p.m. April 22, Steed’s Dairy Farm, 4634 Wrightsboro Road, Grovetown; $25 advance, $30 day of event; this trail run is both fun and challenging with sections of small hill running; families welcome; proceeds benefit Christ Community Health Services Augusta; go to cchsaugusta.org/events to register; cchsaugusta.org/events

Kids’ Day

Columbia County Day 4 Kids, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. April 30, Patriots Park, 5445 Columbia Road; includes area businesses, nonprofits; health fair, activities for children, obstacle course, a Walk4Kids

Butterfly Hearts

Butterfly Hearts Support Group, 6 p.m. April 21, Columbia County Library, 7022 Evans Towne Center Blvd.; New grief support ministry for mothers who have experienced the loss of a child; the group’s objectives are to connect, share like experiences, encourage, love, and pray for one another; meetings are currently scheduled for April 21 and May 19, and will plan to meet every third Thursday

Beer and Barbecue

Blues, Brews and BBQ, 6:30 p.m. April 22 and 29, Columbia County Amphitheater, 7022 Evans Towne Center Blvd.; $5; Barbecue by Southbound Smokehouse, wine by Vineyard Wines, featuring Soul Dimension Band, Roger “Hurricane” Wilson, The Mason Jars and Funky Brewster; columbiacountyga.gov

Professional Rodeo

American Heroes Pro Rodeo, 5:30 p.m. April 22-23, Columbia County Fairgrounds, 5462 Columbia Road; $10 advance, $12 at gate; one of the largest rodeos in the Southeast; IPRA-sanctioned; concessions; proceeds will benefit the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Augusta; for more, go to the American Heroes Pro Rodeo Facebook

Beer festival

Augusta Craft Beer Festival, from noon to 5 p.m. April 23, Lake Olmstead Stadium, 78 Milledge Road; featuring 40 local, regional and national breweries; VIP event begins 11 a.m.; eventbrite.com/e/augusta-craft-beer-festival-tickets-20114064709

Arts at the Gazebo

10 a.m. April 23, 170 W. Milledgeville Road, Harlem; crafts and handmade items for sale, food vendors, artwork, childrens activities, artist demonstrations, live music and a book signing; (706) 556-6656 or (706) 513-2634

Athlete screening

Free cardiac screening for student
athletes in grades 6-12: EKG, cardiac ultrasound, blood pressure and
heart rhythm check, blood sugar and cholesterol checks, body mass index, 8 a.m. to noon April 23, University Evans Campus Imaging Center, 4350 Towne Centre Dr.; only 200 slots available; call (706) 744-8870

Music that matters

Music That Matters, noon April 23, Evans Towne Center Park, 7016 Evans Town Center Blvd.; free; concert by local youth and 4-H Club Showcase; inflatables, 4-H Club exhibitions, animals, robotics, archery; bring lawn chairs; food and drink available for purchase; bit.ly/1ZRhU5y

Bridal Show

Bridal Show 2016, noon to 4 p.m. April 24, Snelling Center, 3165 Washington Road; free; visit edgars
hospitality.com or call (706) 854-4728

Signal Corps Band

Fort Gordon Signal Corps Band Legacy Tour, 3 p.m. April 24; Evans Towne Center Park, 7016 Evans Town Center Blvd.; free; gordon.army.mil/band

Art Gallery opening

Lincoln Artisans Gallery Grand Opening, Lincoln County Historical Park; 2 p.m. April 24; Lincoln County Historical Park, 147 Lumber St.; music, food, art, live music and book signings; (706) 990-0734

CSRA Republican Women’s Club

Dinner 6 p.m., business meeting 7 p.m., April 25, Jones Creek Golf Club, 777 Evans to Locks Road; Republican candidates from Senate Districts 23 & 24, from House District 123, Columbia County District 1 and Columbia County Coroner; reservations required for dinner only, dinner $12, is due on or before April 21; (706) 830-5730

Paddle festival

Benderdinker 2016, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 30, Riverside Park, 4431 Hardy McManus Road; $35; paddle and land festival featuring live music and food; games include corn hole, Bocce ball, mini disc golf; craft beer; benefits Augusta Locally Grown and Bender Digger, a program that teaches youth about gardening; benderdinker.com

Relay for Life

From noon to 10 p.m. April 30, Evans Towne Center Park, 7016 Evans Town Center Blvd.; In case of rain, event will be moved to the gym at Wesley United Methodist Church on North Belair Road; main.acsevents.org/site/TR?pg=entry&fr_id=70777

BBQ Cook Off

Holy Smokes BBQ Cook Off, 10 a.m. April 30, Columbia County Fairgrounds, 5462 Columbia Road; 10 a.m. April 30; Free; features inflatables, cooking competition and family fun; holysmokescookoff.com

Brown Bash

James Brown Birthday Bash, 5 p.m. May 3, Augusta Common, 836 Reynolds St.; $15 advance, $20 day of show; by Friends with Benefits, City of Augusta and James Brown Family Foundation; benefits JAMP; JBfamilyBash.com

Faith concert

Sharon Baptist Church Choir will present the AWESOME GOD CONCERT, on Sunday, May 1 at 6 p.m. The concert is free and will be held in our Family Life Center behind the Sanctuary. Come as you are and prepare to hear an hour of music that will lift your heart.The church is located at 6262 Cobbham Rd. in Appling. Call (706) 541-0667.

Documentary screening

The Thomson-McDuffie County Convention & Visitors Bureau will hold a free, public screening of the documentary film Blind Willie’s Blues on Friday, May 6 at 7 p.m. at the Thomson Depot at 111 Railroad Street in Thomson. After the screening, David Fulmer, the writer and producer of the movie, will give a brief talk and offer a question & answer session for the audience. The event is free and open to the public.


Soul Food

Soul Food Festival, 2 p.m. May 7, Lady Antebellum Pavillion, 7016 Evans Town Center Blvd.; $35-$65; Gates open 2 p.m., show starts 4 p.m.; performers include Rick James and Stone City Band; The Bar Kays, Ohio Players, Slave, Midnight Star, Lakeside, and Sapp; $35 general admission, $45 preferred viewing, $65 VIP seating; ilovesoulfood.com/augusta-ga

Rock & Run

9 a.m. May 7, Blanchard Woods Park, 4600 Blanchard Woods Road; 5K and 1 mile run run; register at active.com; (706) 650-9467

Giant yard sale

Columbia County Giant Community Yard Sale, 7 a.m. May 14-15, Columbia County Fairgrounds, 5642 Columbia Road; Sponsored by the Rotary Club of Columbia County; rent a space and keep the profits; register online; giantcommunityyardsale.com

Sips and Sass

7 p.m. May 14, Riverwood Plantation Barn, 5123 Riverwood Pkwy.; $20; Benefits Ronald McDonald House Charities; presented by the Aiken-Augusta Alumnae Assocation of Alpha Delta Pi; hor d’oeuvres, drinks, dancing and silent auction; for tickets, go to http://bit.ly/1M5AYut

Papa Joe’s Banjo-B-Que

4 p.m. May 27, Evans Towne Center Park, 7016 Evans Town Center Blvd.; $60 weekend pass; featuring Willie Nelson and Family, Old Crow Medicine Show, Steep Canyon Rangers, Blitzen Trapper, Mountain Faith, Sarah Jaroz, Rev. Peyton’s Big Damn Band, Susto, Ben Miller, Have Gun Will Travel, Guthrie Brown & the Family Tree, and more; Little Roy & Lizzie Show and more; Kansas City Barbeque Society sanctioned barbecue competition; craft beer, petting zoo, pig races and more; banjobque.com

Christian singles

6:30-10:30 p.m. Saturdays, Ballroom Dance Center, 525 Grand Slam Drive, off Evans-to- to Locks Road; dance lessons 6:30-7:30 p.m., dance 7:30-10:30 p.m.; refreshments; Augusta Christian Singles; $8 members, $10 others; (762) 233-1978, christiandances.org

Eyeglass help

Financial assistance for qualifying Grovetown residents’ eyeglasses; Grove-town Lions Club Eyeglass Program, P.O. Box 248, Grovetown, GA 30813

Farmers market

4:30-7 p.m. Thursdays through Oct. 30, Columbia County Amphitheater, 7022 Evans Town Center Blvd.; Evans Towne Farmers Market; cooking demos and vegetable gardening education; kim@augustalocallygrown.org, evanstownefarmersmarket.com.

Food pantry

9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday-Thursday, 1959 Appling Harlem Highway, Appling; Columbia County Cares Food Pantry; (706) 541-2834

Gold club

Gold Prospectors Association of America meets 7-9 p.m. second Thursdays, Dayspring Baptist Church, 4220 Belair Frontage Road; (706) 496-4611

Live Wrestling

First Saturday every month; doors open 7:30 p.m., bell time 8 p.m., Patriots Park Gymnasium, 5445 Columbia Road, Grovetown; $10 front row, $7 general admission, 5 and younger free; flatlineprowrestling.com

Hospital classes

Classes each month; Doctors Hospital; (706) 651-2450, doctors-hospital.net

Meditations

4:30 p.m. Wednesdays, Mindbody Stress Reduction Programs, 4210 Columbia Road Suite 4A, Martinez; Mindfulness and Expansive Meditations; $15, $5 students with ID; (706) 496-3935, mindbodystressreduction.com

Female veterans

11 a.m. first Saturdays; The Women’s Veterans Club; $24 per year; April Starks (706) 868-5601

Writers group

6:30 p.m. third Mondays, Georgia Military College, 115 Davis Road; CSRA Writers Group; free, open to the public; for a critique, bring eight copies of up to 10 pages of work (double-spaced); (706) 836-7315

Zumba classes

6:30-7:30 p.m. Thursdays, Mondays, Evans Christian Academy, 213 S. Old Belair Road, Grovetown; $5 per class; (706) 364-3565, evanschristianacademy.org

Wine tastings

4:30-6:30 p.m. Fridays, 1-6 p.m. Saturdays, Vineyard Wine Market, 4414 Evans to Locks Road, Evans; (706) 922-9463, vine11.com

Categories: Local

Lincoln Artisans Gallery to hold grand opening

FROM STAFF REPORTS

The public is welcome to join local artisans to celebrate the grand opening of the Lincoln Artisans Gallery in Lincoln County from 2-4 p.m. Sunday, April 24.

The event will include music, food and art to celebrate the gallery’s opening in the Woodlawn Country store at the Lincoln County Historical Park.

During the grand opening, country musician Chuck DiZinno will entertain guests while artists such as Leonard Jones and Nolia Biggerstaff demonstrate their skills and discuss their artwork. Connely Gallery owner artist Laura Connely’s artwork will also be on display. In addition, authors Ed DeVos and Gail Reed will be available for book signings.

The Lincoln Artisans Gallery is now open every Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday 1 to 5 p.m. Local and regional arts and crafts will be showcased and available for purchase. The gallery has a substantial collection of Leonard Jones works, along with artwork from Chad Cole, Loretta Eby, Bea Mitchum and pottery from Tire City Pottery and Happy Valley Pottery.

Items from the Lincoln County Historical Society such as grits (corn meal) and a selection of historical books are available, along with other consignment items.

Additionally, park tours will be available during these hours led by the gallery staff. The nonprofit Lincoln Artisans Inc., in cooperation with the Lincoln County Historical Society and the Lincoln County Development Authority, are operating the gallery to showcase local and regional arts and crafts.

According to gallery administrator Bea Mitchum, the gallery was originally opened in December.

“We wanted to have a grand opening in the spring once we were fully up and operating,” said Mitchum. “I want to invite both our local friends and folks from the other counties in the CSRA to come to our grand opening, listen to the music, talk to the artists, have some food, see the park and generally enjoy yourself on a great spring afternoon.”

Updates on this and other Lincoln Artisans events are available on Facebook at “Lincoln Artisans.” For more information call Mitchum at (706) 990-0734.

The Lincoln County Historical Park is located at 147 Lumber Street in Lincolnton and the Woodlawn Country Store is inside the park to the right of the Lewis Family Pavilion. The event is free and open to the public.

Categories: Local

Lincoln Artisans Gallery to hold grand opening

FROM STAFF REPORTS

The public is welcome to join local artisans to celebrate the grand opening of the Lincoln Artisans Gallery in Lincoln County from 2-4 p.m. Sunday, April 24.

The event will include music, food and art to celebrate the gallery’s opening in the Woodlawn Country store at the Lincoln County Historical Park.

During the grand opening, country musician Chuck DiZinno will entertain guests while artists such as Leonard Jones and Nolia Biggerstaff demonstrate their skills and discuss their artwork. Connely Gallery owner artist Laura Connely’s artwork will also be on display. In addition, authors Ed DeVos and Gail Reed will be available for book signings.

The Lincoln Artisans Gallery is now open every Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday 1 to 5 p.m. Local and regional arts and crafts will be showcased and available for purchase. The gallery has a substantial collection of Leonard Jones works, along with artwork from Chad Cole, Loretta Eby, Bea Mitchum and pottery from Tire City Pottery and Happy Valley Pottery.

Items from the Lincoln County Historical Society such as grits (corn meal) and a selection of historical books are available, along with other consignment items.

Additionally, park tours will be available during these hours led by the gallery staff. The nonprofit Lincoln Artisans Inc., in cooperation with the Lincoln County Historical Society and the Lincoln County Development Authority, are operating the gallery to showcase local and regional arts and crafts.

According to gallery administrator Bea Mitchum, the gallery was originally opened in December.

“We wanted to have a grand opening in the spring once we were fully up and operating,” said Mitchum. “I want to invite both our local friends and folks from the other counties in the CSRA to come to our grand opening, listen to the music, talk to the artists, have some food, see the park and generally enjoy yourself on a great spring afternoon.”

Updates on this and other Lincoln Artisans events are available on Facebook at “Lincoln Artisans.” For more information call Mitchum at (706) 990-0734.

The Lincoln County Historical Park is located at 147 Lumber Street in Lincolnton and the Woodlawn Country Store is inside the park to the right of the Lewis Family Pavilion. The event is free and open to the public.

Categories: Local
 
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