Section 3: 1951 - 2000

OVERVIEW

Augusta began the latter half of the 20th century with high hopes and brimming optimism.

Why not? Everything kept getting bigger.

The Savannah River Plant nuclear facility added healthy paychecks to the regional economy.

Construction of new industry south of town brought in more jobs.

Even the Masters Tournament began to grow as TV coverage made celebrities out of golfers Arnold Palmer and Jack Nicklaus.

Read more »


People

Augusta has been a presidential magnet

Presidents from George Washington to Clinton visited Augusta for policy and pleasure. Early visits were generally governmental, as Augusta was vital to military strategy in the South.

Places

Fort Gordon-Augusta ties are strong

Fort Gordon's mission has remained the same for more than 30 years -- to train signal soldiers for the Army.

Newspaper

Paper has been a technology pioneer

The South's Oldest Newspaper was an innovator when journalism technology began to change in the 1970s.

Stories

James Brown helped calm Augusta rioters

Forty years ago, racial violence erupted in Augusta when large crowds of blacks began to demand answers to the jailhouse death of 16-year-old Charles Oatman.


Timeline

new document
Section 1: 1785 - 1885 »
Section 2: 1886 - 1950 »
Section 3: 1951 - 2000 »
Section 4: 2001 - Future »


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Special


A series on the history of the Tubmans, a group of slaves set free by Augustan Richard Tubman in 1836. Go to section »

Our Town

Bill Kirby blogs Augusta history.
A building of many stories
Go to Our Town blog »

Front Pages


Archives

Browse more historic pages dating to 1792 at AugustaArchives.com

As Printed

Contains every page of the 225th Anniversary section exactly as printed.

Section 1

Section 2

Section 3

Section 4
Top headlines

More details in McCormick attack

The McCormick County Sheriff's Office continues to investigate the reported attack on a bicyclist over the weekend, but has yet to find much evidence, a spokesman said Tuesday.